Secret History Armada

Look outs on the English coast have been expecting the Spanish Armada for 3 years and now they’re here. The Spanish called it the Enterprise of England a massive sea born invasion. What happened next has been celebrated by the English ever since. It is one of the ways the English define themselves: it’s pluck in the face of adversity, it’s coolness under fire, it’s effortless superiority, the English David against the Spanish Goliath. That’s the legend but the real Armada story is a country defended by pirates, who through cunning caution and ingenuity managed not loose … just.

World War II In Colour Episode 7 Turning the Tide

World War II In HD Colour is a 13 episode television documentary series recounting the major events of World War II narrated by Robert Powell. The series combines both original and colourised footage. With the very latest satellite delivered terrain mapping and state of the art graphics this story can now be told with access to information which was not previously available to other older series. Conventional wisdom has recently changed as more and more secrets have been revealed particularly in the last five to ten years as documents, files and photographs have been released. Code breaking revelations, and newly released government papers on both sides of the Atlantic have added a very insightful new dimension to the understanding of this the worlds’ greatest ever conflict. Episode 7 Turning the Tide – The Allies and the Axis are searching for a final blow to each other to end the war. While the Allies try out strategic fire bombing, Hitler tries cutting off American supply lines with submarines. So begun a long game of cat and mouse between U-Boats and British and American convoys.

Terry Jones’ The Story of 1

The story of the number one is the story of Western civilization. Terry Jones goes on a humor filled journey to recount the amazing tale behind the world’s simplest number. Using computer graphics, “One” is brought to life, in all his various guises, in Story of 1. One’s story reveals how celebrated civilizations in history were achieved, where our modern numbers came from and how the invention of zero changed the world forever, and saved us from having to use Roman numerals today.

500 Nations Episode 5 A Cauldron of War

In September 2004, on the last remaining site on the Mall in Washington D.C., the Smithsonian Institution opened the National Museum of the American Indian, inaugurating a new era in the education of all people about Native America. In conjunction with this event, and in response to popular demand 500 nations was broadcast on the Discovery Channel. Episode 5 Cauldron of War – Europe fights to control American resources, turning Indian homelands into a “Cauldron of War.” Many indigenous nations side with the French but when the defeated country leaves its Indian allies vulnerable determined leader, Pontiac, rises to prominence.

History's Turning Points 711 A.D. The Conquest of Spain

Each turning point in history has behind it a story and a set of principal characters whose dilemmas and conflicts form its dramatic core, and whose unique personalities influenced the outcome of events. History’s Turning Points provides a fascinating and intriguing new perspective on the significant moments that have changed the world. The Conquest of Spain – 711 AD By the 8th century, the rise of the Muslim Empire spread Arab rule over the Middle East, Egypt, and North Africa. After appointing a Berber, Tariq, to invade Spain, the Arabs enslaved the Visigoth Kingdom. Seven centuries of their Moorish rule brought accomplishments in mathematics, architecture, and science

The Living Edens Manu: Peru’s Hidden Rain Forest

The Living Edens uses state of the art cinematography creates an intimate sense of place and captures a world of wonder, transporting viewers to isolated, undisturbed corners of the globe so pure they remind us of how the ancient world once was. Narrators included Peter Coyote and Linda Hunt and it was partially funded by Reader’s Digest in exchange for various marketing rights. Episode 4 Manu Peru Hidden Rainforest – Along the eastern base of the Peruvian Andes is a great river named Manu, the life blood for one of the world’s great secrets: the Manu Biosphere Reserve. This Eden is the richest Amazonian wilderness on Earth. As mist rises off the great river, howler monkeys issue the wake up call it is morning in the rain forest. Hundreds of parrots form a brilliant kaleidoscope as they feast on the cliff side clay. Giant otters take their first swim in the cool waters while sloths get a slow start to their day beneath the mystical canopy. Discover what the day will bring in this mysterious tropical paradise where 90 per cent of the flora and fauna have yet to be identified.

Delphi: The Bellybutton of the Ancient World

What really went on at the ancient Greek oracle at Delphi, how did it get its awesome reputation and why is it still influential today? Michael Scott of Cambridge University uncovers the secrets of the most famous oracle in the ancient world. The programme investigates the oracular sanctuary of Delphi in ancient Greece and asks how it managed to survive as the omphalos, the bellybutton, of the ancient world for over 1000 years and what Delphi still has to say to us today. The programme examines not just the activity of the oracle at Delphi, but the stories of the many other gods, athletic games, monuments to unity and civil war that populated the sanctuary, showing how Delphi evolved to reflect and affect the changing world around it. With locations ranging from the grandeur of Delphi to caves in the Parnassian mountains, from the glory of Athens to the cosmopolitan city of Istanbul, and with contributions from French, British and Greek archaeologists, this documentary helps unravel the mystery of the place. A vital force in ancient history for a thousand years, it is now one of Greece’s most beautiful tourist sites, but in its time it has been a gateway into the supernatural, a cockpit of political conflict, and a beacon for internationalism. And at its heart was the famous inscription which still inspires visitors today – “Know Thyself”.

The Mountain That Had To Be Painted

Documentary about the painters Augustus John and his young protege James Dickson Innes who, in 1911, left London for the wild Arenig Valley in North Wales. Over three years, they created a body of work to rival the visionary landscapes of Matisse. The paintings were the entry point for British art into Post-Impressionism. The Arenig mountain had such a hypnotic fascination for Innes that in 1910 he committed Arenig Fawr obsessively to canvas in a free and impulsive way which, one expert said, no British artist had yet managed. His work excited John, older by nine years, into following him up to North Wales, in due course bringing his chaotic menage along too. It was a fruitful stay. In John’s paintings the mountain’s contours had to compete with a figure, invariably a sinewy female and often swathed in swirling Romany scarves, parked foursquare in the foreground. One of these women was the sultry beauty Euphemia Lamb who bedded both men (among many others) and who would break Innes’s heart. But the profounder relationship of the two men seems to have been, on a creative level, with each other and with the landscape.

Brilliant Britain Alan Cumming

Celebrities discuss eccentricities in the UK and what makes the British sense of humour unique. Episode Alan Cumming – The actor explores the roots of Scottish humour and does the rounds with some Glasgow refuse collectors.

Medieval Season Christina A Medieval Life

Historian Michael Wood delves through medieval court records to follow the fortunes of a village in Hertfordshire and, more particularly, the family of peasant Christina Cok. The 14th century was a perilous time in British history, shot through with famine, plague and war. It was a time of climate change, virulent cattle diseases and, above all, the Black Death. But it was also the time when modern mentalities were shaped, not just by the rulers but increasingly by the common people.

Walking With Monsters Episode 2 Reptile’s Beginnings

A three episode series about life in the Paleozoic, bringing to life extinct arthropods, fish, amphibians, synapsids, and reptiles. As with previous Walking with installments, it uses state-of-the-art visual effects and draws on the knowledge of over 600 scientists and shows nearly 300 million years of history, from the Cambrian Period (530 million years ago) to the Early Triassic Period (248 million years ago). Episode 2 Reptile’s Beginnings – Explains that because of a much higher oxygen content in the atmosphere, giant land arthropods evolved. A storm brews and the narrator explains that its high oxygen content makes the atmosphere very combustible, so lightning is a real danger. The episode then moves on to the early Permian, where trees of the Carboniferous have been replaced with more advanced conifers that are better adapted to survive in a changing climate. At the end the narrator says that the reptiles evolve to tighten their grip on land, becoming “new reptiles.”

Merthyr War Memorial: Behind the Stone

Documentary telling the story behind the Pontmorlais First World War memorial in Merthyr Tydfil. In recent years, the memorial has been suffering from neglect and vandalism. The programme looks at how a new generation of children from Cyfarthfa Junior school in Merthyr are introduced to the idea of why war memorials were erected, and their significance in the community. The children took part in a Heritage Lottery project where they helped produce an animation film about the Pontmorlais memorial alongside professional film makers. The film follows the children’s exploration of war, through a series of workshops and visits which are locally and nationally based, from Cyfarthfa Castle Museum to the Cenotaph and the Imperial War Museum in London. The four minute animation film, which the children helped produce, is shown in the documentary.

Discover Magazine Strange Memories

From our wedding day to where we left the car keys, from the trivial facts to the monumental events. Memories form the landscape of our lives and build a bridge between where we have been and where we are going, without memory we would be lost. Although we depend on it every day, how much do we really know about how it works? Today researchers exploring the frontiers of memory are coming closer to discovering the biological mechanisms of how we remember and why we forget.

Secrets of Lost Empires Series 2 Episode 3 Pharaohs Obelisk

In the series, nova crews attempt to ferret out long forgotten secrets of early architects and engineers. How did they design and erect the medieval war machines known as trebuchets? Egyptian obelisks? The Easter Island stone monoliths called moais? Roman baths? The rainbow bridges of ancient China? Pharaoh’s Obelisk – The soaring stone monuments known as obelisks were the Egyptian pharaohs’ way of capturing a ray of revered sunlight in stone. In this section, follow nova’s ultimately successful attempts to raise an obelisk of its own. Also, learn where ancient Egypt’s obelisks have ended up today, explore other Egyptian monuments using QuickTime VR, and more.

World War II In Colour Episode 8 The Soviet Steamroller

World War II In HD Colour is a 13 episode television documentary series recounting the major events of World War II narrated by Robert Powell. The series combines both original and colourised footage. With the very latest satellite delivered terrain mapping and state of the art graphics this story can now be told with access to information which was not previously available to other older series. Conventional wisdom has recently changed as more and more secrets have been revealed particularly in the last five to ten years as documents, files and photographs have been released. Code breaking revelations, and newly released government papers on both sides of the Atlantic have added a very insightful new dimension to the understanding of this the worlds’ greatest ever conflict. Episode 8 The Soviet Steamroller – After Hitler’s gamble in the East fails, the Soviet Union, with its vast resources and armies, starts to slowly push back and grow. Hitler is now on the defence on 2/3 of his fronts. The Red Army slowly pushed the Germans back out of Russia through Ukraine, Poland, the Balkans and Hungary. This was war on a monster scale, pitching armies of millions against each other. But it was also a war fought by small bands of partisans, men like Tito in Yugoslavia, leading guerrilla bands against Nazi forces.

The 27 inch Man

The extraordinary life of Columbian Edward Hernandez who at the age of 24 was just 27 inches tall. Because of his tiny size, Edward was used to unwanted attention from strangers but in 2010 his life changed dramatically when he was officially declared the shortest man in the world. The media frenzy was immediate, he became a hit on the Latin American chat show circuit. How would Edward cope with overnight fame and how long could he keep hold of his title?

500 Nations Episode 6 Removal

In September 2004, on the last remaining site on the Mall in Washington D.C., the Smithsonian Institution opened the National Museum of the American Indian, inaugurating a new era in the education of all people about Native America. In conjunction with this event, and in response to popular demand 500 nations was broadcast on the Discovery Channel. Episode 6 Removal – Follow the Trail of Tears as Native Americans are displaced even as they adopt American ways. Shawnee leader Tecumseh sparks a return to traditional ways but The Indian Removal Act becomes law in 1830. Many stoically accept, others resist.

History's Turning Points 1789 A.D. Revolution to Paris

Each turning point in history has behind it a story and a set of principal characters whose dilemmas and conflicts form its dramatic core, and whose unique personalities influenced the outcome of events. History’s Turning Points provides a fascinating and intriguing new perspective on the significant moments that have changed the world. Revolution to Paris – 1789 A.D. A prison is stormed and modern France is born On July 14th 1789 the starving and destitute citizens of Paris riot in search of food and weapons.

The Route Masters Running London's Roads Episode 2 Night Bus

With access to 20,000 transport workers, bus drivers, cabbies, road menders and special police units, this series shows how London really works and introduces viewers to those whose job it is to keep the city moving. Seeing the city through the eyes of those responsible for vital maintenance and traffic regulation is a revelation. That this overcrowded city’s roads work as well as they do is more than impressive, it’s an everyday miracle! Episode 2 Night Bus – The number of passengers travelling around London in the small hours has tripled since 2000 and the night bus service has expanded to cope with the demand, but its drivers face an unpredictable crowd. Tommy McKerr faces trouble on the long N25 route to Essex when a gang of young men piles onto the bus without paying, while a homeless man shows how he has perfected the art of riding London’s longest route to keep warm.

DNA: Secret of Photo 51

On April 25, 1953, the science journal Nature announced that James Watson and Francis Crick had discovered the double helix structure of DNA, the molecule that is fundamental to life. But absent from most accounts of their Nobel Prize winning work is the contribution made by a scientist, molecular biologist and crystallographer Rosalind Franklin, who would never know that Watson and Crick had seen a key piece of her data without her permission and that it would lead them to the double helix. Fifty years later, this documentary unravels the mystery behind the discovery of the double helix and investigates the seminal role that Rosalind Franklin and her remarkable X-ray photograph played in one of the greatest discoveries in the history of science.

The Poet Who Loved the War Ivor Gurney

A charismatic original, Ivor Gurney, who prior to the Great War had suffered a nervous breakdown at the Royal College of Music, enlisted as an experiment, he actually found the war invigorating and for a while his mental health improved. Unlike the other war poets Gurney wasn’t a commissioned officer, he was an ordinary front line soldier. A private. The poetry he wrote there is uniquely powerful, capturing the experience of the ordinary soldier, and the this documentary argues that it is the equal of the work of any of the more well known soldier poets of WWI.

Britain A.D. Episode 2 The Invasion That Never Was

This series expands on Britain BC Francis Pryor traces the story of King Arthur back to its ancient origins. Putting forth the compelling idea that most of its key elements are deeply rooted in Bronze and Iron Ages he argues that the legends survival mirrors a flourishing indigenous culture that endured through the Roman occupation of Britain and the subsequent invasions of the so called Dark Ages.

Modern Marvels The Berlin Wall

Modern Marvels celebrates the ingenuity, invention and imagination found in the world around us. This series tells fascinating stories of the doers, the dreamers and sometime schemers that create everyday items, technological breakthroughs and manmade wonders. The hit series goes deep to explore the leading edge of human inspiration and ambition. Episode The Berlin Wall – During the Cold War, the Berlin Wall stood as a forbidding barrier in an embattled world. The Wall system stretched 103 miles through and around Berlin, locking in 1.3 million people. 261 died trying to get over, under, around, and through it.

Walking With Monsters Episode 3 Clash of Titans

A three episode series about life in the Paleozoic, bringing to life extinct arthropods, fish, amphibians, synapsids, and reptiles. As with previous Walking with installments, it uses state-of-the-art visual effects and draws on the knowledge of over 600 scientists and shows nearly 300 million years of history, from the Cambrian Period (530 million years ago) to the Early Triassic Period (248 million years ago). Episode 3 Clash of Titans – Set in the Late Permian, on the super continent Pangaea. In this arid climate, early therapsids, more “mammal-like” than reptile, are shown fighting to survive alongside other animals. The narrator explains that mammals are destined to be confined to the shadows as a new group of animals becomes the dominant species on Earth. The age of mammal-like reptiles is over. This is the beginning of the Age of Dinosaurs.

Nazi Sunken Sub

For nearly seventy years the fate of the lost Nazi submarine U-745 remained a mystery. After a decade of painstaking research and exploration, a Finnish diving team has finally solved the riddle.