Discover Magazine Hidden Temples of Angkor Wat

Angkor Wat, one of the wonders of the ancient world rises from the Cambodian jungle. The magnificent temples and gigantic reservoirs built by the Khmer empire have long mystified scientists. What was the purpose behind the vast water system? 25 years of war and killing fields isolated Angkor from the outside world. Archaeologists are turning to a technological breakthrough to solve the mysteries of the ancients. Astonishing views from the space shuttle high tech radar are giving scientists a revolutionary new look at Angkor and changing old ideas about the mysterious temples. Who where the Khmer? How did they eek a living out of this harsh realm. How did they manage to create a city of such splendor and scale.

Rocket Science Episode 3

Across the U.K., fewer and fewer youngsters want to study chemistry and physics, so with the help of physics teacher Andy Smith, Rocket Science sets out to convert a small sample by teaching them everything safe there is to know about fireworks. Kids? Fireworks? It’s a health and safety nightmare. But once Andy has grabbed their attention with a few flashes and bangs, he shows the class how much serious science is involved in the creation of the average rocket. Episode 3 – Charlie and friends are off to China, to the the birthplace of the banger. Every evening in Liuyang, there is a huge display as firework manufacturers show off their latest designs, and the kids learn how the precision and power of physics is used to create the fantastic sky writing fireworks. Back home, Mr Smith takes the class to witness the extraordinary power of expanding gases with the Royal Artillery. Finally, the whole class are invited behind the scenes at one of the biggest firework displays the U.K. has ever seen. Has the Rocket Science project made any difference to the kids’ interest and appreciation of the science that fills the world around them?

World War II In Colour Episode 6 The Mediterranean and North Africa

World War II In HD Colour is a 13 episode television documentary series recounting the major events of World War II narrated by Robert Powell. The series combines both original and colourised footage. With the very latest satellite delivered terrain mapping and state of the art graphics this story can now be told with access to information which was not previously available to other older series. Conventional wisdom has recently changed as more and more secrets have been revealed particularly in the last five to ten years as documents, files and photographs have been released. Code breaking revelations, and newly released government papers on both sides of the Atlantic have added a very insightful new dimension to the understanding of this the worlds’ greatest ever conflict. Episode 6 The Mediterranean and North Africa – After success in North Africa and Greece, Allies push Benito Mussolini’s forces all the way back to Italy and the Allies start to put real pressure on Nazi Germany. Hitler, now faced a difficult choice. Did he divert troops needed at other fronts to support his ally, or did he let Mussolini fall? Hitler chose to support him, a decision that would spell disaster for both of them.

Telling Tales Young Offender

Jason Williams has a history of persistance offending, and is about to finish his sentence of 3 years. Thsi documentary follows him as he prepares to leave jail.

500 Nations Episode 4 Invasion Of The Coast

In September 2004, on the last remaining site on the Mall in Washington D.C., the Smithsonian Institution opened the National Museum of the American Indian, inaugurating a new era in the education of all people about Native America. In conjunction with this event, and in response to popular demand 500 nations was broadcast on the Discovery Channel. Episode 4 Invasion Of The Coast – As more foreigners arrive in North America, tensions rise as native peoples lives are impacted. At Jamestown, the story of the Powhatan princess, Pocahontas, unfolds. Thanksgiving at Plymouth leads to the bloodiest of colonial Indian wars in 1675.

Hangar 1 The UFO Files Episode 1 Presidential Encounters

MUFON, an independent organization dedicated to investigating UFOs, has worked diligently to compile, research and store these files. The series Hangar 1 The UFO Files will delve deep into these archives to look for connections, clues and evidence, because only by investigating the files of Hangar 1 can we find the truth about UFOs. Episode 1 Presidential Encounters – From Truman to Obama, our modern day Presidents have all had rich and controversial histories with UFOs and extraterrestrials. In fact, Eisenhower, Nixon, Carter, and Reagan are each rumored to have had personal encounters. Inside Hangar 1, MUFON files ask, “What do our presidents really know about the existence of UFOs?” Are some Presidents kept in the dark because they aren’t trusted with that knowledge and how they might use it? Or, are they all aware, but the secrets are too dark and deep that full disclosure becomes a risk they just can’t take?

The Living Edens Kamchatka: Siberia’s Forbidden Wilderness

The Living Edens uses state of the art cinematography creates an intimate sense of place and captures a world of wonder, transporting viewers to isolated, undisturbed corners of the globe so pure they remind us of how the ancient world once was. Narrators included Peter Coyote and Linda Hunt and it was partially funded by Reader’s Digest in exchange for various marketing rights. Episode 13 Kamchatka Siberia Forbidden Wilderness – Jutting south from the far east of Siberia lies an isolated and mountainous peninsula where volcanoes, geysers and bubbling hot springs create the smoke, steam and fire that prevail in this icy and remote place. This harsh and beautiful land is home to the densest population of grizzly bears in the world and the biggest brown bears in Eurasia. Siberian bighorn sheep, silver foxes, sables, mink and black capped marmots have all adapted to the severe climate. Walruses, northern fur seals, sea lions dot its coastline, and bowhead whales breed in the waters just offshore. Millions of salmon swim in its streams while the world’s largest eagles soar above all that make Kamchatka a living Eden. Narrated by Linda Hunt.

Crater of Death

This is the profile of an extraterrestrial mass murderer: one whose existence was denied by scientific orthodoxy for nearly two decades, but has now been tracked down. 65 million years ago a 15 kilometers wide asteroid hit the Earth. In 1978 Walter Alvarez, a Nobel prize winning physicist, and his son Luis, first proposed the outrageous idea that a meteorite strike blasted the dinosaurs into extinction, taking with them half of life on the planet. Their theory was hotly disputed. Now the irrefutable evidence is rolling in. Martin Belderson’s dramatic film retraces the hunt for evidence for the hidden “smoking cannon” the crater left by the impact 65 million years ago.

The Mexican-American War

At a time when immigration reform continues to be one of the most heated topics in political and business circles, this feature length special reexamines the controversial war that resulted in the United States taking control of what was nearly half of Mexico’s territory. Featuring lavish reenactments, and interviews with both Mexican and American historians to tell the story of President Polk’s desire to expand US territory to the Pacific Ocean. Hosted by Oscar de la Hoya.

Biography The Google Boys

Google has been estimated to run over one million servers in data centers around the world. Google’s meteoric rise to Internet stardom is one of the great business sagas of our time. Larry Page and Sergey Brin two brainy Stanford University grad students who founded the company say their goal was to make the entire world’s information searchable and instantly accessible.

Mandela: The Living Legend Episode 1

David Dimbleby narrates two part documentary profile of Nelson Mandela. Former South African President and ANC leader, Nelson Mandela offers unprecedented access and a unique glimpse into his hectic daily life. Filmed at his home in South Africa and in a series of exclusive interviews with David Dimbleby, Mandela relays stories from his childhood and recounts many of the significant events that took place in his life, including his leadership of the ANC party and struggle against Apartheid, his term in office; and the arduous time he spent in Robben Island Prison. Recollections of his life are also heard from family and friends alongside famous and ordinary people, including the ANC’s political role model and the Cuban revolutionary leader, Fidel Castro. Former United States President and fellow AIDS campaigner, Bill Clinton speaks of the deep admiration that he holds for Mandela.

Walking With Monsters Episode 1 Water Dwellers

A three episode series about life in the Paleozoic, bringing to life extinct arthropods, fish, amphibians, synapsids, and reptiles. As with previous Walking with installments, it uses state-of-the-art visual effects and draws on the knowledge of over 600 scientists and shows nearly 300 million years of history, from the Cambrian Period (530 million years ago) to the Early Triassic Period (248 million years ago). Episode 1 Water Dwellers – Begins with an illustration of the giant impact hypothesis approximately 4.4 billion years ago when the Earth was formed, it is conjectured that a planet like object, Theia collided into the early Earth, dynamically reshaping the Earth and forming the moon. The episode then jumps ahead to the Cambrian Explosion, showing the first diversification of life in the sea. Strange predators called Anomalocaris feed on trilobites, and are attacked by a school of Haikouichthys, the first vertebrate. In the Silurian period see the jawless fish, the marine scorpion and the giant eurypterid. Other species in this episode are Hynerpeton, Stethacanthus and Hyneria.

Megalightning

Entirely new forms of lightning have been discovered up to 1000 times bigger than any bolt previously seen. While normal lightning fires down below clouds, these giant bolts shoot up, stunning experts with images of lightning 80 kilometres high. This lightning, six times more powerful than passenger planes are designed to withstand, may be the real killer in a spate of baffling air disasters. Few cloud to ground strikes are longer than three kilometres. and textbooks said no lightning could exist above the clouds, but then weatherman walt lyons aimed his camera across the colorado plains on july 6, 1993. What he saw overturned 200 years of scientific certainty in an instant. His videos show lightning 80 kilometres high and 40 kilometres wide firing above the clouds. Their existence had been dismissed as fantasy, their discovery sheds new light on what has been causing airplanes to fall from the sky. The discovery of megalightning began with ordinary people seeing extraordinary things. This documentary interviews these people and explores the topic of megalightning.

Your Paintings: A Culture Show Special

For years, thousands of paintings owned by the British public have been hidden away and inaccessible, until now. Thanks to the work of the Your Paintings project, over 200,000 works in our national collections have been painstakingly uncovered, photographed and put online, some for the very first time, allowing art experts and amateur sleuths alike to make connections and discoveries that wouldn’t have been possible before. Alastair Sooke teams up with art detective Dr. Bendor Grosvenor to unearth some hidden gems and find out what the paintings say about British society.

Discover Magazine Secret Lives of Dinosaurs

Dinosaurs, their secrets can be revealed. For the largest creature to walk the earth, was breaking the sound barrier foreplay to mating? Did T-rex stalk the prehistoric jungle with they eyes of a hawk? After all that eating dinosaurs dropped mountains of dung loaded with clues. Unloock secrets from fossilized feces and become a dinosaur detective. Are prehistoric footprints evidence of one dinosaur attacking another? The world of dinosaurs is a mysterious place once wrapped in silence. But now for the first time dinosaurs are breaking their silence. Speaking to humans over millions of years of time. And scientist using the latest computers are listening. From love to death the secret lives of dinosaurs are revealed in this documentary.

Secret History Armada

Look outs on the English coast have been expecting the Spanish Armada for 3 years and now they’re here. The Spanish called it the Enterprise of England a massive sea born invasion. What happened next has been celebrated by the English ever since. It is one of the ways the English define themselves: it’s pluck in the face of adversity, it’s coolness under fire, it’s effortless superiority, the English David against the Spanish Goliath. That’s the legend but the real Armada story is a country defended by pirates, who through cunning caution and ingenuity managed not loose … just.

World War II In Colour Episode 7 Turning the Tide

World War II In HD Colour is a 13 episode television documentary series recounting the major events of World War II narrated by Robert Powell. The series combines both original and colourised footage. With the very latest satellite delivered terrain mapping and state of the art graphics this story can now be told with access to information which was not previously available to other older series. Conventional wisdom has recently changed as more and more secrets have been revealed particularly in the last five to ten years as documents, files and photographs have been released. Code breaking revelations, and newly released government papers on both sides of the Atlantic have added a very insightful new dimension to the understanding of this the worlds’ greatest ever conflict. Episode 7 Turning the Tide – The Allies and the Axis are searching for a final blow to each other to end the war. While the Allies try out strategic fire bombing, Hitler tries cutting off American supply lines with submarines. So begun a long game of cat and mouse between U-Boats and British and American convoys.

Terry Jones’ The Story of 1

The story of the number one is the story of Western civilization. Terry Jones goes on a humor filled journey to recount the amazing tale behind the world’s simplest number. Using computer graphics, “One” is brought to life, in all his various guises, in Story of 1. One’s story reveals how celebrated civilizations in history were achieved, where our modern numbers came from and how the invention of zero changed the world forever, and saved us from having to use Roman numerals today.

500 Nations Episode 5 A Cauldron of War

In September 2004, on the last remaining site on the Mall in Washington D.C., the Smithsonian Institution opened the National Museum of the American Indian, inaugurating a new era in the education of all people about Native America. In conjunction with this event, and in response to popular demand 500 nations was broadcast on the Discovery Channel. Episode 5 Cauldron of War – Europe fights to control American resources, turning Indian homelands into a “Cauldron of War.” Many indigenous nations side with the French but when the defeated country leaves its Indian allies vulnerable determined leader, Pontiac, rises to prominence.

History's Turning Points 711 A.D. The Conquest of Spain

Each turning point in history has behind it a story and a set of principal characters whose dilemmas and conflicts form its dramatic core, and whose unique personalities influenced the outcome of events. History’s Turning Points provides a fascinating and intriguing new perspective on the significant moments that have changed the world. The Conquest of Spain – 711 AD By the 8th century, the rise of the Muslim Empire spread Arab rule over the Middle East, Egypt, and North Africa. After appointing a Berber, Tariq, to invade Spain, the Arabs enslaved the Visigoth Kingdom. Seven centuries of their Moorish rule brought accomplishments in mathematics, architecture, and science

The Living Edens Manu: Peru’s Hidden Rain Forest

The Living Edens uses state of the art cinematography creates an intimate sense of place and captures a world of wonder, transporting viewers to isolated, undisturbed corners of the globe so pure they remind us of how the ancient world once was. Narrators included Peter Coyote and Linda Hunt and it was partially funded by Reader’s Digest in exchange for various marketing rights. Episode 4 Manu Peru Hidden Rainforest – Along the eastern base of the Peruvian Andes is a great river named Manu, the life blood for one of the world’s great secrets: the Manu Biosphere Reserve. This Eden is the richest Amazonian wilderness on Earth. As mist rises off the great river, howler monkeys issue the wake up call it is morning in the rain forest. Hundreds of parrots form a brilliant kaleidoscope as they feast on the cliff side clay. Giant otters take their first swim in the cool waters while sloths get a slow start to their day beneath the mystical canopy. Discover what the day will bring in this mysterious tropical paradise where 90 per cent of the flora and fauna have yet to be identified.

Delphi: The Bellybutton of the Ancient World

What really went on at the ancient Greek oracle at Delphi, how did it get its awesome reputation and why is it still influential today? Michael Scott of Cambridge University uncovers the secrets of the most famous oracle in the ancient world. The programme investigates the oracular sanctuary of Delphi in ancient Greece and asks how it managed to survive as the omphalos, the bellybutton, of the ancient world for over 1000 years and what Delphi still has to say to us today. The programme examines not just the activity of the oracle at Delphi, but the stories of the many other gods, athletic games, monuments to unity and civil war that populated the sanctuary, showing how Delphi evolved to reflect and affect the changing world around it. With locations ranging from the grandeur of Delphi to caves in the Parnassian mountains, from the glory of Athens to the cosmopolitan city of Istanbul, and with contributions from French, British and Greek archaeologists, this documentary helps unravel the mystery of the place. A vital force in ancient history for a thousand years, it is now one of Greece’s most beautiful tourist sites, but in its time it has been a gateway into the supernatural, a cockpit of political conflict, and a beacon for internationalism. And at its heart was the famous inscription which still inspires visitors today – “Know Thyself”.

The Mountain That Had To Be Painted

Documentary about the painters Augustus John and his young protege James Dickson Innes who, in 1911, left London for the wild Arenig Valley in North Wales. Over three years, they created a body of work to rival the visionary landscapes of Matisse. The paintings were the entry point for British art into Post-Impressionism. The Arenig mountain had such a hypnotic fascination for Innes that in 1910 he committed Arenig Fawr obsessively to canvas in a free and impulsive way which, one expert said, no British artist had yet managed. His work excited John, older by nine years, into following him up to North Wales, in due course bringing his chaotic menage along too. It was a fruitful stay. In John’s paintings the mountain’s contours had to compete with a figure, invariably a sinewy female and often swathed in swirling Romany scarves, parked foursquare in the foreground. One of these women was the sultry beauty Euphemia Lamb who bedded both men (among many others) and who would break Innes’s heart. But the profounder relationship of the two men seems to have been, on a creative level, with each other and with the landscape.

Brilliant Britain Alan Cumming

Celebrities discuss eccentricities in the UK and what makes the British sense of humour unique. Episode Alan Cumming – The actor explores the roots of Scottish humour and does the rounds with some Glasgow refuse collectors.

Medieval Season Christina A Medieval Life

Historian Michael Wood delves through medieval court records to follow the fortunes of a village in Hertfordshire and, more particularly, the family of peasant Christina Cok. The 14th century was a perilous time in British history, shot through with famine, plague and war. It was a time of climate change, virulent cattle diseases and, above all, the Black Death. But it was also the time when modern mentalities were shaped, not just by the rulers but increasingly by the common people.