2057 Life 50 years From Now The World

What would you see and experience if the clocks rolled forward 50 years? In a unique blend of drama and science, this three part series shows you the world of tomorrow. Will we have flying cars? Will advances in medicine help us stay young forever? What about “printing” custom made vital organs? The World – An invisible soldier? A space elevator to the stars? Transmit the inventory of the Library of Congress via laser beam in seconds? What are the real fuel sources of the future? Learn about technological quantum leaps that will shape our planet in 50 years.

Medieval Season Stephen Fry and The Machine That Made Us

The Gutenberg Press was perhaps the most revolutionary machine ever invented. Stephen Fry discovers the lengths to which Gutenberg went to keep his project secret, then helps to build a working model of the press and explores how print democratised knowledge by making the written word accessible to all. Stephen Fry investigates the story of one of the most important machines ever invented – the Gutenberg Press

Rocket Science Episode 3

Across the U.K., fewer and fewer youngsters want to study chemistry and physics, so with the help of physics teacher Andy Smith, Rocket Science sets out to convert a small sample by teaching them everything safe there is to know about fireworks. Kids? Fireworks? It’s a health and safety nightmare. But once Andy has grabbed their attention with a few flashes and bangs, he shows the class how much serious science is involved in the creation of the average rocket. Episode 3 – Charlie and friends are off to China, to the the birthplace of the banger. Every evening in Liuyang, there is a huge display as firework manufacturers show off their latest designs, and the kids learn how the precision and power of physics is used to create the fantastic sky writing fireworks. Back home, Mr Smith takes the class to witness the extraordinary power of expanding gases with the Royal Artillery. Finally, the whole class are invited behind the scenes at one of the biggest firework displays the U.K. has ever seen. Has the Rocket Science project made any difference to the kids’ interest and appreciation of the science that fills the world around them?

The Universe Season 5 Episode 2 Mars The New Evidence

We are in the midst of the greatest era of space discovery. Twenty first century spacecraft and sophisticated imaging technology are venturing into uncharted territory every day, and much of the extraordinary phenomena are happening right in our own cosmic backyard. Episode 6 Ten Ways to Destroy the Earth – Don’t try this at home! In this episode, our experts cook up ten ways you could destroy the earth, including: swallowing it with a microscopic black hole; blowing it up with anti-matter; hurling it into the Sun, and switching off gravity. This is a fun way to explore the dangerous physics of the Universe and the properties of the planet we call home.

Inside the Milky Way

Embark on an astounding journey across 100,000 light years to witness key moments in the history of the Milky Way. Using cutting edge science, National Geographic constructs a 3-D state-of-the-art CGI model of our galaxy. Gaze into the heart of the Milky Way on the hunt for super-massive black holes. Witness as stars are born and die. Fly out and above the plane of our galaxy to understand its true shape and scour its dusty spiral arms for the possibility of life.

Blood and Guts A History of Surgery Episode 3 Spare Parts

Documentary series about the brutal, bloody and dangerous history of surgery looks at how surgery dragged itself kicking and screaming out of the dark ages, transforming itself from butchery into a science. Presenter Michael Mosley recounts the history of surgery through its catastrophes and successes. Episode 3 Spare Parts – These days, transplant surgery saves thousands of lives every year and almost everything, from heart to eyes, can be replaced. But in the beginning, transplants killed rather than cured, because surgeons didn’t understand that they were taking on one of the most efficient killing systems we know of, the human immune system.

Modern Marvels The Golden Gate Bridge

Modern Marvels celebrates the ingenuity, invention and imagination found in the world around us. This series tells fascinating stories of the doers, the dreamers and sometime schemers that create everyday items, technological breakthroughs and manmade wonders. The hit series goes deep to explore the leading edge of human inspiration and ambition. Episode The Golden Gate Bridge – The Golden Gate Bridge is one of the foremost man, made tourist attractions in the United States. But at one time, critics said it could never be built. From the start, the project looked impossible. Yet engineer Joseph B. Strauss’ plans proved to be a masterpiece of design and function. In four years, the longest, highest, most spectacular suspension bridge on earth opened to the public, and became one of the greatest symbols of American ingenuity.

Seven Wonders Of The Industrial World Episode 3 Bell Rock Lighthouse

The period of over 125 years from the beginning of the 19th century saw the creation of some of the world’s most remarkable feats of engineering. Seven of the most notable are described here, each one proving that human creativity is as much alive in the modern world as it was in ancient times. Episode 3 The Bell Rock – Lighthouse that was created off the east coast of Scotland bringing light to the treacherous coast. The Bell Rock, a large reef 11 miles out to sea, dangerously positioned in the approach to the Firth of Forth. In 1799, over 70 ships went down in a violent storm that raged along the coast, yet still the authorities opposed the plan. Battling against the odds, Stevenson did eventually build his lighthouse, and to this day it shines out across the North Sea, the oldest offshore lighthouse still standing anywhere in the world.

What the Tudors Did For Us Episode 2 The Thynkyng Revolution

What an unruly lot! Beheadings, murder, divorce, rows with the Pope, civil war, fire and plague. The headline stories from the Tudor and Stuart years represent a roller-coaster ride through one of the most important periods of history in the development of modern Britain. Most know the bloody, battle filled history of the Tudor period, not many know the accomplishments of the period. Adam Hart-Davis travels through England in search of Tudor excellence in science, art, printing, exploration and more. Ranging from a shepherd’s discovery of graphite which led to the first pencil, to a fuller understanding of human anatomy once Henry VII legalized human dissection. Episode 2 The Thinkynge Revolution – Hart-Davis travels around Britain to introduce the idea and inventions of the Tudor Age in science, literature and education. The first printing press, like the one recreated at St Bride Printing Library, was brought to England by William Paxton. The resulting printing revolution included William Tyndale’s English bible that lead to the standardisation of the English language. State education was founded by Henry VIII providing opportunities for Christopher Marlowe and William Harvey amongst others. Modern medicine began from the Swiss Alchemist Paracelsus’ belief that minerals and chemicals could be used to treat diseases. Observational science came of age when Thomas Diggs recorded the first observation of a supernova.

Television Under the Swastika English with Spanish Subtitles

Legend has it that the triumphal march of television began in the United States in the 1950s but in reality its origins hark back much further. Nazi leaders, determined to beat Great Britain and the U.S. to be the world’s first television broadcaster, began Greater German Television in March 1935. German viewers enjoyed their TV broadcasts until September 1944, as Allied troops closed in. Making use of 285 reels of film discovered in the catacombs of the Berlin Federal Film Archive, Television Under the Swastika is a fascinating look at the world’s first television broadcast network. It explores both the technology behind this new medium, and the programming the Nazis chose to put on it. Interviews with high ranking Nazis as well as “ordinary” people on the street, cooking shows, sporting events, cabaret acts and teleplays are some of the stunning finds seen here-all of it propaganda, but some of it quite entertaining.

Genius Series Pythagoras

This Documentary describes Pythagoras. It was produced as part of a series on Geniuses in 1996. Pythagoras, 530 BC must have been one of the world’s greatest men, but he wrote nothing, and it is hard to say how much of the doctrine we know as Pythagorean is due to the founder of the society and how much is later development. It is also hard to say how much of what we are told about the life of Pythagoras is trustworthy, for a mass of legend gathered around his name at an early date. Sometimes he is represented as a man of science, and sometimes as a preacher of mystic doctrines, and we might be tempted to regard one or other of those characters as alone historical.

Naked Science Episode 5 The Deadliest Shark

The series features various subjects related to science and technology. Some of the views expressed might be considered fringe or pseudo-science. Episode 5 The Deadliest Shark – Experts compare the deadliness of bull, white, and tiger sharks, as well as profile their biology and behavior.

Stardate Mysteries of Venus

Stardate presents and examines the most intriguing planets, asteroids, stars and astrological phenomena in precise detail with the help of scientists and experts. This award winning series is a reliable source for information and trivia about the galaxy and is used in some astronomy classes. Some of the programs funded by the US government and produced with NASA, give the viewers a better grasp on the concepts of space. Episode Stardate: Mysteries of Venus – As the Venus Express spacecraft approaches its destination this documentary examines this most intriguing of planets and help find the answers to why a planet the same size, age and of similar composition to Earth has become our almost exact opposite. Why is it so hot? Could Venus’s runaway greenhouse effect one day happen on Earth? Why does the entire surface of the planet seem to have been resurfaced in one go? And do the opaque clouds which surround Venus host an even greater mystery: alien life? Presenter Adam Hart-Davis reports from a tense mission control in Germany as the spacecraft is manouvered into orbit.

Chernobyl Life in the Dead Zone

What would happen if the world were suddenly without people if we vanished off the face of the earth? How would nature react and how swiftly? This program takes place at the site of the world’s worst nuclear accident, hastily abandoned by panic stricken humans 20 years ago when highly radioactive fall out flooded everything within a 32 kilometre radius. Cattle and people were evacuated and only wild animals remained. While humans have made life in this land impossible for themselves, the animals have found a way and they have not just survived, they have thrived.

Absolute Zero Episode 1 The Conquest Of Cold

Air-conditioning, refrigeration, and superconductivity are just some of the ways technology has put cold to use. But what is cold, how do you achieve it, and how cold can it get? This documentary series explores these and other facets of the frigid. It follows the quest for cold from the unlikely father of air-conditioning, the court magician of King James I of England in the 17th century, to today’s scientists pioneering super fast computing in the quantum chill. The program is based on the definitive book on cold: Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold by Tom Shachtman. Episode 1 The Conquest of Cold – opens in the 1600s when the nature of cold and even heat were a complete mystery. Are they different phenomena or aspects of some unified feature of nature? The experiments that settled these questions helped stoke the Industrial Revolution. This episode includes Cornelius Drebbel’s spooky trick of turning summer into winter for the English king, Antoine Lavoisier’s battle with Count Benjamin Rumford over the caloric theory of heat, and Michael Faraday’s explosive experiments to liquefy gases, which established the principles that make refrigerators possible.

Mega Disasters Hypercane

Mega Disasters also released as series Prehistoric Megastorms. Mega Disasters explores potential catastrophic threats to individual cities, countries, and the entire globe. The two “mega-disasters” of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and Hurricane Katrina in 2005 inspired the series and provided a reference point for many of the episodes. Excepting only two shows devoted to man-made disasters, the threats explored can be divided into three general categories: meteorological, geological, and cosmic hazards. Episode 1 Hypercane – 65 million years ago the asteroid of the Yucatan Peninsula could have caused a giant storm that might have killed 70 percent of all animals on earth.

Sci Fi Science Physics of the Impossible Series 1 Episode 2 How to Travel to a Parallel Universe

Science fiction isn’t just for the movies! Cyborgs, shape shifting, the colonization of space and tons more really are possible. Dr. Kaku investigates the likelihood of popular sci-fi beliefs and ideas that currently seem beyond the realm of possibility, and shows us that these technologies could materialize sooner than we think. Featuring the latest research and most recent technologies, this series takes a look at things such as Lightsabers, Star Ships, Death Stars, and Warp Drives. Discover the science and realities behind these and other notions from the sci-fi world that are pushing the boundaries of technology and human ingenuity. Impossible? That’s what we said decades ago about man walking on the moon. Episode 2 How to Travel to a Parallel Universe – Dr. Kaku explores the idea of parallel universes.

The Universe Season 5 Episode 3 Magnetic Storm

We are in the midst of the greatest era of space discovery. Twenty first century spacecraft and sophisticated imaging technology are venturing into uncharted territory every day, and much of the extraordinary phenomena are happening right in our own cosmic backyard. Episode 6 Ten Ways to Destroy the Earth – Don’t try this at home! In this episode, our experts cook up ten ways you could destroy the earth, including: swallowing it with a microscopic black hole; blowing it up with anti-matter; hurling it into the Sun, and switching off gravity. This is a fun way to explore the dangerous physics of the Universe and the properties of the planet we call home.

Japan in Colour The Wonderful World of Albert Kahn

In 1908, the French banker and philanthropist Albert Kahn launched one of the most ambitious projects in the history of photography. A pacifist, internationalist and utopian idealist, Kahn decided to use his private fortune to improve understanding between the nations of the world. To this end, he created what he called his Archive of the Planet. For the next two decades, he dispatched professional photographers to document the everyday lives of people in more than 50 countries all around the world. Kahn’s wealth enabled him to supply his photographers with the most advanced camera technology available.

Blood and Guts A History of Surgery Episode 5 Bloody Beginnings

Documentary series about the brutal, bloody and dangerous history of surgery looks at how surgery dragged itself kicking and screaming out of the dark ages, transforming itself from butchery into a science. Presenter Michael Mosley recounts the history of surgery through its catastrophes and successes. Episode 5 Bloody Beginnings – Presenter Michael Mosley finds out how the early days of surgery were dark and barbaric, when the surgeon’s knife was more likely to kill you than save you, and invasive medicine generally meant being bloodlet by leeches to within an inch of your life.

Modern Marvels The Great Wall Of China

Winding roughly 6,700 kilometers through undulating mountains, grasslands, and desert, its vastness seems beyond the realm of human possibility. A wonder of the ancient world, the Great Wall of China is one of mankind’s most massive building achievements. Yet contrary to popular belief, there is no single wall of China, but rather a series of walls built for different reasons at different times. Modern Marvels series embarks on a journey of discovery, investigating the mysterious history surrounding this cultural marvel. Historians and modern engineers discuss the planning, construction, and function of various segments while extensive location footage illuminates the stunning majesty of its architecture. Legend claims that the wall is a wellspring of warfare, madness, and death, can this be true? From ancient China onwards, this documentary explores the incredible history of The Great Wall of China.

Seven Wonders Of The Industrial World Episode 4 The Sewer King

The period of over 125 years from the beginning of the 19th century saw the creation of some of the world’s most remarkable feats of engineering. Seven of the most notable are described here, each one proving that human creativity is as much alive in the modern world as it was in ancient times. Episode 4 The Sewer King – In the summer of 1858 London was in the grip of a crisis known as the Great Stink. The population had grown rapidly during the first half of the 19th century, yet there had been no provision for sanitation. Three epidemics of cholera had swept through the city, leaving over 30,000 people dead. And sewage was everywhere.

What the Victorians Did For Us Episode 1 The Speed Merchant

What the Victorians Did for Us examines the impact of the Victorian era on modern society. It concentrates primarily on the scientific and social advances of the era, which bore the Industrial Revolution and set the standards for polite society today. When Victoria came to the throne in 1837, Britain was on the brink of world supremacy in the production of iron, steel, and steam engines, and had seen an explosion of growth and developments that included railways, the electric telegraph, and wool production. The tremendous feeling of national pride was celebrated in the Great Exhibition of 1851. Drawing on his consummate skill as a storyteller, Adam Hart-Davis shows how Victorian movers and shakers changed our world. Episode 1 Speed Merchants – Focuses on the Victorian obsession with speed, and the impact of steam power on farming. After visiting the last steam-powered mill in the country, Adam experiences the legacy of Brunel’s Great Western Railway, and sees if a project to build a steam-powered plane can ever get off the ground.

Terry Jones’ The Story of 1

The story of the number one is the story of Western civilization. Terry Jones goes on a humor filled journey to recount the amazing tale behind the world’s simplest number. Using computer graphics, “One” is brought to life, in all his various guises, in Story of 1. One’s story reveals how celebrated civilizations in history were achieved, where our modern numbers came from and how the invention of zero changed the world forever, and saved us from having to use Roman numerals today.

History's Turning Points 1945 A.D. The Atomic Bomb

Each turning point in history has behind it a story and a set of principal characters whose dilemmas and conflicts form its dramatic core, and whose unique personalities influenced the outcome of events. History’s Turning Points provides a fascinating and intriguing new perspective on the significant moments that have changed the world. The Atomic Bomb – 1945 A.D. Without doubt, the Second World War was the most momentous event in U.S. history. Few single instants have marked so great and historic watershed as 915 a.m., August 6, 1945. Traditional war as an instrument of international policy ended completely, and future relations between nations changed drastically afterward.