Discover Magazine The Origins of HumorTelevision, and Execution

Every night comedians walk on stage to make people laugh. Every day scientists are working to understand the millions of years of evolution behind that laughter. They are learning valuable lessons from comedians in their quest to understand the origins of humor. Radiovisiontelephonoscope, and audiovision were all words for what we now call television. Was it invented by an Idaho farm boy, a Russian immigrant or a Scottish inventor John Logie Baird? Bear’s televisor looked very different from what we have today. Finally this documentary looks at the origins of the methods used for capital punishment, it is not a discussion of whether it is right or wrong. Death by lethal injection is the most technically advanced method of execution available today, it is the latest in a long line of methods in a quest to make the act more efficient and humane.

Rocket Science Episode 1

Across the U.K.fewer and fewer youngsters want to study chemistry and physics, so with the help of physics teacher Andy Smith, Rocket Science sets out to convert a small sample by teaching them everything safe there is to know about fireworks. Kids? Fireworks? It’s a health and safety nightmare. But once Andy has grabbed their attention with a few flashes and bangs, he shows the class how much serious science is involved in the creation of the average rocket. Episode 1 – Physics teacher Andy Smith tries to convert his pupils to physics and chemistry. at the beginning Andy is in for a rough ride. Pupil Chantelle, for instance, thinks science is just copying answers from a textbook, while Taz wants to be Kate Moss, and Charlie can do the work but won’t behave. To engage the children, Andy has to battle short attention spans and the fact that most chemicals in the school storeroom are well past their sell by date.

What the Stuarts Did For Us Episode 2 The Applyance of Science

The series explores scientific inventions and discoveries made during the Stuart period from 1603 to 1714 and their implications even today. Episodes are grouped based on themes architecture and lifestyleengineering and sciences, economics and politics, and discoveries with influence in science fiction. Episode 2 The Applyance of Science – Before Stuart times science was dominated by Greek philosopher Aristotle, dead for 2000 years his ideas were becoming discredited and the Stuarts wanted a new approach to understanding nature. This episode charts how the birth of the Royal Society marked a shift from ancient Greek and medieval thought to a more modern scientific approach. This revolutionary time heralded the beginnings of the steam age, hydrodynamics and aerodynamics, as well as the giant revolution accomplished by that greatest of all Stuarts, Sir Isaac Newton.

MegaStructures Built from Disaster Episode 4 Stadiums

Megastructures: Built from Disaster explores how accidents throughout the world have influenced the evolution of modern structural engineering. Stadiums Episode 4 – Sport stadiums are amongst the most iconiceye catching structures of the modern world. Symbols of local and national pride, they play host to huge crowds on a weekly basis. No other structure holds so many people in such close proximity and in such an emotionally charged atmosphere-so when the structures fail, the effects can be catastrophic. Over the past century, more than 1,600 people have died at stadiums across the world. To prevent disasters happening in the stadiums of the future, engineers have had to learn what went wrong in the past.

Seven Wonders Of The Industrial World Episode 4 The Sewer King

The period of over 125 years from the beginning of the 19th century saw the creation of some of the world’s most remarkable feats of engineering. Seven of the most notable are described hereeach one proving that human creativity is as much alive in the modern world as it was in ancient times. Episode 4 The Sewer King – In the summer of 1858 London was in the grip of a crisis known as the Great Stink. The population had grown rapidly during the first half of the 19th century, yet there had been no provision for sanitation. Three epidemics of cholera had swept through the city, leaving over 30,000 people dead. And sewage was everywhere.

DNA: Secret of Photo 51

On April 25,1953, the science journal Nature announced that James Watson and Francis Crick had discovered the double helix structure of DNA, the molecule that is fundamental to life. But absent from most accounts of their Nobel Prize winning work is the contribution made by a scientist, molecular biologist and crystallographer Rosalind Franklin, who would never know that Watson and Crick had seen a key piece of her data without her permission and that it would lead them to the double helix. Fifty years later, this documentary unravels the mystery behind the discovery of the double helix and investigates the seminal role that Rosalind Franklin and her remarkable X-ray photograph played in one of the greatest discoveries in the history of science.

Absolute Zero Episode 1 The Conquest Of Cold

Air-conditioningrefrigeration, and superconductivity are just some of the ways technology has put cold to use. But what is cold, how do you achieve it, and how cold can it get? This documentary series explores these and other facets of the frigid. It follows the quest for cold from the unlikely father of air-conditioning, the court magician of King James I of England in the 17th century, to today’s scientists pioneering super fast computing in the quantum chill. The program is based on the definitive book on cold: Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold by Tom Shachtman. Episode 1 The Conquest of Cold – opens in the 1600s when the nature of cold and even heat were a complete mystery. Are they different phenomena or aspects of some unified feature of nature? The experiments that settled these questions helped stoke the Industrial Revolution. This episode includes Cornelius Drebbel’s spooky trick of turning summer into winter for the English king, Antoine Lavoisier’s battle with Count Benjamin Rumford over the caloric theory of heat, and Michael Faraday’s explosive experiments to liquefy gases, which established the principles that make refrigerators possible.

Naked Science Episode 2 Super Volcanoes

The series features various subjects related to science and technology. Some of the views expressed might be considered fringe or pseudo-science. Episode 2 Super Volcano – In spring 2003strange things began happening in America’s most famous national park, Yellowstone. The tallest geyser in the world, which can go 50 years without erupting, burst into life. There were new cracks in the ground, the ground heated up to the point where the National Park Service had to close some trails. Not long after, a group of bison collapsed and died, victims of poisonous fumes from below the ground. Satellite pictures revealed that something ominous was happening beneath the earth.

The True Story Frankenstein

The story of Frankenstein has haunted us for almost 200 years a monster brought to life by a mad scientist in his secret laboratory. But is Mary Shelley’s book pure fiction after all? This programme uncovers facts and sheds light on a dark world of bizarre scientific experiments intended to unlock the secret of life.

Television Under the Swastika English with Spanish Subtitles

Legend has it that the triumphal march of television began in the United States in the 1950s but in reality its origins hark back much further. Nazi leadersdetermined to beat Great Britain and the U.S. to be the world’s first television broadcaster, began Greater German Television in March 1935. German viewers enjoyed their TV broadcasts until September 1944, as Allied troops closed in. Making use of 285 reels of film discovered in the catacombs of the Berlin Federal Film Archive, Television Under the Swastika is a fascinating look at the world’s first television broadcast network. It explores both the technology behind this new medium, and the programming the Nazis chose to put on it. Interviews with high ranking Nazis as well as ordinary people on the streetcooking shows, sporting events, cabaret acts and teleplays are some of the stunning finds seen here-all of it propaganda, but some of it quite entertaining.

Download The True Story Of The Internet Episode 2 Search The rise of Google and Yahoo

Technology journalist John Heileman presents the story of the Internet revolution and its culturalcommercial, and social impact to our lives. In fighting. Backstabbing. An epic battle with billions of dollars at stake. Witness the backroom clashes that sparked a cultural and commercial revolution in Download The True Story of the Internet. From the founders of eBay, Yahoo, Amazon, Netscape, Goggle and other powerbrokers, experience amazing stories of how the Internet took control of our lives in 10 short years. These pioneers tell how they went from geeky nerds to 21st century visionaries in the time it takes most people to get their first promotion.

Rocket Science Episode 2

Across the U.K.fewer and fewer youngsters want to study chemistry and physics, so with the help of physics teacher Andy Smith, Rocket Science sets out to convert a small sample by teaching them everything safe there is to know about fireworks. Kids? Fireworks? It’s a health and safety nightmare. But once Andy has grabbed their attention with a few flashes and bangs, he shows the class how much serious science is involved in the creation of the average rocket. Episode 2 – The kids finally mount their own triumphant firework display for the retiring head, and we see how practical work makes all the difference. They are involved and excited as they do kitchen chemistry, measure the speed of sound, and even take on the atomic basics of how coloured light is created. To show how firework science connects to the real world, Mr Smith organises field trips to where the chemicals that colour fireworks actually come from Nevada, Scotland and China.

What the Tudors Did For Us Episode 2 The Thynkyng Revolution

What an unruly lot! Beheadingsmurder, divorce, rows with the Pope, civil war, fire and plague. The headline stories from the Tudor and Stuart years represent a roller-coaster ride through one of the most important periods of history in the development of modern Britain. Most know the bloody, battle filled history of the Tudor period, not many know the accomplishments of the period. Adam Hart-Davis travels through England in search of Tudor excellence in science, art, printing, exploration and more. Ranging from a shepherd’s discovery of graphite which led to the first pencil, to a fuller understanding of human anatomy once Henry VII legalized human dissection. Episode 2 The Thinkynge Revolution – Hart-Davis travels around Britain to introduce the idea and inventions of the Tudor Age in science, literature and education. The first printing press, like the one recreated at St Bride Printing Library, was brought to England by William Paxton. The resulting printing revolution included William Tyndale’s English bible that lead to the standardisation of the English language. State education was founded by Henry VIII providing opportunities for Christopher Marlowe and William Harvey amongst others. Modern medicine began from the Swiss Alchemist Paracelsus’ belief that minerals and chemicals could be used to treat diseases. Observational science came of age when Thomas Diggs recorded the first observation of a supernova.

MegaStructures Built from Disaster Episode 6 Skyscrapers

Megastructures: Built from Disaster explores how accidents throughout the world have influenced the evolution of modern structural engineering. Skyscrapers Episode 6 – The titans of city architecture for over a centuryskyscrapers dominate urban landscapes throughout the world. No other building design so readily accommodates the voracious need for space in urban centres, but there can be a high price for this solution to overcrowded city life. Within such high and crowded structures, the consequences of engineering errors can be catastrophic.

Seven Wonders Of The Industrial World Episode 5 The Panama Canal

The period of over 125 years from the beginning of the 19th century saw the creation of some of the world’s most remarkable feats of engineering. Seven of the most notable are described here each one proving that human creativity is as much alive in the modern world as it was in ancient times. Episode 5 The Panama Canal – Having completed the building of the Suez Canal in 1869, a Frenchman, Vicomte Ferdinand de Lesseps, dreamed of an even bolder scheme: the Panama Canal. Making the world itself would seem a smaller place. Once out in the tropical heat of Panama, however, the French found themselves facing impenetrable jungle, dangerous mudslides and deathly tropical diseases, as the project proved to be an undertaking of nightmare proportions. The extravagant dream eventually came true, but in the process it stole over 25,000 lives, and 25 years had to elapse before the oceans were finally united.

Fermat’s Last Theorem

This documentary tells the enthralling and emotional story of Andrew Wiles. A quiet English mathematicianhe was drawn into maths by Fermat’s puzzle, but at Cambridge in the 1970s, it was considered a joke, so he set it aside. Then, in 1986, an extraordinary idea linked this irritating problem with one of the most profound ideas of modern mathematics the Taniyama Shimura Conjecture. When he heard, Wiles went after his childhood dream again. In June 1993 he reached his goal. At a three day lecture at Cambridge, he outlined a proof of Taniyama, and with it Fermat’s Last Theorem. Then disaster struck. His colleague, Dr Nick Katz, made a tiny request for clarification. It turned into a gaping hole in the proof. As Andrew struggled to repair the damage, pressure mounted for him to release the manuscript, to give up his dream.

Absolute Zero Episode 2 The Race for Absolute Zero

Air-conditioningrefrigeration, and superconductivity are just some of the ways technology has put cold to use. But what is cold, how do you achieve it, and how cold can it get? This documentary series explores these and other facets of the frigid. It follows the quest for cold from the unlikely father of air-conditioning, the court magician of King James I of England in the 17th century, to today’s scientists pioneering super fast computing in the quantum chill. The program is based on the definitive book on cold: Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold by Tom Shachtman. Episode 2 The Race For Absolute Zero – picks up the story in the late 19th century, when researchers plunged cold science to new lows as they succeeded in reaching the forbidding realm at which oxygen and then nitrogen liquefy. Scottish chemist James Dewar and Dutch physicist Heike Onnes are featured. The race to the bottom of the temperature scale was as zealous as the contemporaneous race to the Earth’s poles. New techniques developed in the 1990s by Daniel Kleppner set the stage for a race to create an exotic form of matter called a Bose Einstein condensate, which only forms at temperatures vanishingly close to absolute zero.

Naked Science Episode 3 Angry Earth

The series features various subjects related to science and technology. Some of the views expressed might be considered fringe or pseudo-science. Episode 3 Angry Earth – In the last centurymore than 1 million people died in earthquakes. Over the next century, it is feared that number could increase ten-fold. Why? Because Earthquakes don’t kill people. Buildings do. And urban populations are increasing so fast that we now have mega-cities. We discover the seismic vulnerability of some of the world’s mega cities and the threat posed to millions of people all over the world.

The True Story Jurassic Park

Jurassic Park tells the story of billionaire John Hammond creating a theme park where the main attractions are dinosaurs. He invites Alan Grantan eminent palaeontologist, and other scientists to the island to share his vision. They are in awe of what he has achieved, but things go wrong when there is a security breach and the dinosaurs escape. The visitors become the hunted as the dinosaurs pick off the visitors one by one. Finally, the remaining four survivors make a desperate escape from the island via helicopter. This documentary reveals the science behind Jurassic Park is based on rigorous scientific research and that the key character at the centre of the film is inspired by a real life individual. The vision of how dinosaurs could be bought back to life has now been shown to be impossible. But this documentary will feature recent remarkable breakthroughs in biology that would allow dinosaurs to walk again. Using cutting edge evolutionary biology, scientists are getting closer to bringing the dinosaur back to life. With extensive location filming, expert interviews, forensic science and drama recon we bring the real story of Jurassic Park to life.

Terry Jones’ The Story of 1

The story of the number one is the story of Western civilization. Terry Jones goes on a humor filled journey to recount the amazing tale behind the world’s simplest number. Using computer graphics One is brought to lifein all his various guises, in Story of 1. One’s story reveals how celebrated civilizations in history were achieved, where our modern numbers came from and how the invention of zero changed the world forever, and saved us from having to use Roman numerals today.

Genius Series Galileo

In 1564the year that gave England Shakespeare, Galileo was born in Piza, in Italy the cradle of the Renaissance. But Galileo was pre-destined for trouble. His father was as argumentative as Galileo was to become. The open minded and broad education that the young Galileo was given in music, literature, art, and science guaranteed that he could never hold his tongue and suffer in silence. Most of his childhood went unrecorded but as a young boy his fascination with mechanics showed that his was an enquiring unfettered mind. It was this attitude that was to lead later to triumph and catastrophe.

Rocket Science Episode 3

Across the U.K.fewer and fewer youngsters want to study chemistry and physics, so with the help of physics teacher Andy Smith, Rocket Science sets out to convert a small sample by teaching them everything safe there is to know about fireworks. Kids? Fireworks? It’s a health and safety nightmare. But once Andy has grabbed their attention with a few flashes and bangs, he shows the class how much serious science is involved in the creation of the average rocket. Episode 3 – Charlie and friends are off to China, to the the birthplace of the banger. Every evening in Liuyang, there is a huge display as firework manufacturers show off their latest designs, and the kids learn how the precision and power of physics is used to create the fantastic sky writing fireworks. Back home, Mr Smith takes the class to witness the extraordinary power of expanding gases with the Royal Artillery. Finally, the whole class are invited behind the scenes at one of the biggest firework displays the U.K. has ever seen. Has the Rocket Science project made any difference to the kids’ interest and appreciation of the science that fills the world around them?

What the Victorians Did For Us Episode 1 The Speed Merchant

What the Victorians Did for Us examines the impact of the Victorian era on modern society. It concentrates primarily on the scientific and social advances of the erawhich bore the Industrial Revolution and set the standards for polite society today. When Victoria came to the throne in 1837, Britain was on the brink of world supremacy in the production of iron, steel, and steam engines, and had seen an explosion of growth and developments that included railways, the electric telegraph, and wool production. The tremendous feeling of national pride was celebrated in the Great Exhibition of 1851. Drawing on his consummate skill as a storyteller, Adam Hart-Davis shows how Victorian movers and shakers changed our world. Episode 1 Speed Merchants – Focuses on the Victorian obsession with speed, and the impact of steam power on farming. After visiting the last steam-powered mill in the country, Adam experiences the legacy of Brunel’s Great Western Railway, and sees if a project to build a steam-powered plane can ever get off the ground.

Modern Marvels Deadliest Weapons

Modern Marvels celebrates the ingenuity, invention and imagination found in the world around us. This series tells fascinating stories of the doers, the dreamers and sometime schemers that create everyday items, technological breakthroughs and manmade wonders. Episode Deadliest Weapons – Profiles of five of the world’s deadliest weapons, focusing on the inventors, battles, and dark technology behind their lethality. Beginning with the deadliest bomb ever created, the Tsar Bomba, a 50 megaton nuclear bomb, we move on to the deadliest weapons ever used on people, the atomic bombs exploded over Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945, the machine gun, the VT fuse, and VX nerve gas.

Seven Wonders Of The Industrial World Episode 6 The Line

The period of over 125 years from the beginning of the 19th century saw the creation of some of the world’s most remarkable feats of engineering. Seven of the most notable are described hereeach one proving that human creativity is as much alive in the modern world as it was in ancient times. Episode 6 The Line – By the middle of the 19th century, the benefits brought by the host of advances of the industrial age were gradually beginning to reach America, which soon developed a spectacular achievement of its own, the Transcontinental Railway, reaching right across the continent. With two teams, one building from the east and the other from California in the west, they battled against hostile terrain, hostile inhabitants, civil war and the Wild West. Yet in 1869, the two teams’ tracks were joined, shrinking the whole American continent, as the journey from New York to San Francisco was reduced from months to days.

Google: Behind The Screen

What if all the information in the world was categorized and easily searchable? What if all the news from around the worldall books, written texts, photos and videos that exist on a place in the world would be collected, and would be available everywhere? That is precisely the goal of Google and it will not be long for it to be realized. Through the well known search engine, Google Earth, where all information is classified by geographical location, along with Google Books, a project where Google digitizes complete libraries. Google: Behind the Screen includes interviews with Marissa Mayer, Vint Cerf, Ian Brown (Open Rights Group), Brewster Kahle (founder of Internet Archive) and others covering topics such as page rank, targeted advertising, life at Google, user privacy, machine translation, the story of Don’t Be Evil.

American Experience Dinosaur Wars

In the late 19th centurypaleontologists Edward Cope and O.C. Marsh uncovered the remains of hundreds of prehistoric animals in the American West, including dozens of previously undiscovered dinosaur species. In the summer of 1868, paleontologist Othniel Charles Marsh boarded a Union Pacific train for a sight-seeing excursion through the heart of the newly-opened American West. While most passengers simply saw magnificent landscapes, Marsh soon realized he was traveling through the greatest dinosaur burial ground of all time. Ruthless, jealous and insanely competitive, Marsh would wrestle over the discovery with the other leading paleontologist of his generation, Edward Drinker Cope. Over time, the two rivals would uncover the remains of dozens of prehistoric animals, including over 130 dinosaur species, collect thousands of specimens, provide ample evidence to prove Charles Darwin’s hotly disputed theory of evolution and put American science on the world stage. But their professional rivalry eventually spiraled out of control. What began with denigrating comments in scientific publications led to espionage, the destruction of fossils and political maneuvering that ultimately left both men alone and almost penniless.

Naked Science Episode 4 Who Built Stonehenge?

The series features various subjects related to science and technology. Some of the views expressed might be considered fringe or pseudo-science. Episode 4 Who Built Stonehenge? – This episode demonstrates how these stones could have been carried such a vast distanceand raised into place, using just the primitive technology possessed by Ancient Britons almost 5000 years ago. And, for the first time, the film employs modern forensic investigation techniques to examine human skeletons found near the site and recreates the face of one man who may have worked on the construction of this astonishing, ancient structure.

The Universe Episode 2 Mars The New Evidence

We are in the midst of the greatest era of space discovery. Twenty first century spacecraft and sophisticated imaging technology are venturing into uncharted territory every dayand much of the extraordinary phenomena are happening right in our own cosmic backyard. Episode 6 Ten Ways to Destroy the Earth – Don’t try this at home! In this episode, our experts cook up ten ways you could destroy the earth, including: swallowing it with a microscopic black hole; blowing it up with anti-matter; hurling it into the Sun, and switching off gravity. This is a fun way to explore the dangerous physics of the Universe and the properties of the planet we call home.

The Atomic Cafe

One of the defining documentaries of the 20th century The Atomic Cafe offers a darkly humorous glimpse into mid-century America, an era rife with paranoia, anxiety, and misapprehension. Whimsical and yet razor-sharp, this timeless classic illuminates the often comic paradoxes of life in the Atomic Age, while also exhibiting a genuine nostalgia for an earlier and more innocent nation.Immensely entertaining and devilishly witty, The Atomic Cafe serves up a revealing slice of American history the legendary decade when we learned to live in a nuclear world.

Genius Series Pythagoras

This Documentary describes Pythagoras. It was produced as part of a series on Geniuses in 1996. Pythagoras530 BC must have been one of the world’s greatest men, but he wrote nothing, and it is hard to say how much of the doctrine we know as Pythagorean is due to the founder of the society and how much is later development. It is also hard to say how much of what we are told about the life of Pythagoras is trustworthy, for a mass of legend gathered around his name at an early date. Sometimes he is represented as a man of science, and sometimes as a preacher of mystic doctrines, and we might be tempted to regard one or other of those characters as alone historical.

Sci Fi Science Physics of the Impossible Series 1 Episode 2 How to Travel to a Parallel Universe

Science fiction isn’t just for the movies! Cyborgsshape shifting, the colonization of space and tons more really are possible. Dr. Kaku investigates the likelihood of popular sci-fi beliefs and ideas that currently seem beyond the realm of possibility, and shows us that these technologies could materialize sooner than we think. Featuring the latest research and most recent technologies, this series takes a look at things such as Lightsabers, Star Ships, Death Stars, and Warp Drives. Discover the science and realities behind these and other notions from the sci-fi world that are pushing the boundaries of technology and human ingenuity. Impossible? That’s what we said decades ago about man walking on the moon. Episode 2 How to Travel to a Parallel Universe – Dr. Kaku explores the idea of parallel universes.

Wonders of the Solar System Episode 2 Order Out Of Chaos

In this spellbinding series Professor Brian Cox visits the most extreme locations on Earth to explain how the laws of physics carved natural wonders across the solar system. Episode 2 Order Out of Chaos – Cox starts this episode in Al-QayrawanTunisia to analyse the orbit of the planets around our Sun, with details on how the tilt of the Earth creates the seasons. He also visits the Atlas Mountains and provides an explanation of the how we see the orbit of Mars. This episode also provides an insight on the rings of Saturn and the geysers of Enceladus, including images shown as seen from the Cassini Huygens space probe.

Modern Marvels Eiffel Tower

Modern Marvels celebrates the ingenuityinvention and imagination found in the world around us. This series tells fascinating stories of the doers, the dreamers and sometime schemers that create everyday items, technological breakthroughs and manmade wonders. The hit series goes deep to explore the leading edge of human inspiration and ambition. Episode Eiffel Tower – When it was built over a century ago the Eiffel Tower provoked widespread outrage among some of France’s most prominent citizens of the day. This documentary brings the captivating story behind one of the most recognizable engineering marvels of the late nineteenth century. It is a monumental tale of the technological challenges and architectural breakthroughs brought about by the construction of this preeminent hallmark of the City of Lights.

Seven Wonders Of The Industrial World Episode 7 The Hoover Dam

The period of over 125 years from the beginning of the 19th century saw the creation of some of the world’s most remarkable feats of engineering. Seven of the most notable are described hereeach one proving that human creativity is as much alive in the modern world as it was in ancient times. Episode 7 The Hoover Dam – In the early 1900s engineers began to realise that it would be possible to make the desert bloom, by building a dam across the Colorado River. Some 60 storeys high, and of a larger volume than the Great Pyramid at Giza, the Hoover Dam was soon to break all records. Poverty stricken workers on the dam, earning just a few dollars a day, died from horrific explosions, carbon monoxide poisoning and heat exhaustion as it slowly came to fruition. The chief engineer, Frank Crowe, finished ahead of schedule and under budget.

Hitler’s Bomb

In December 1938in Berlin, a simple chemical experiment showed for the first time that the atom can be split, releasing immense power. Within months, the Wehrmacht had started research into nuclear weapons. The Germans were the first to start work on the atom bomb. The programme investigates the reasons why Hitler was not the first leader to use it, drawing on new evidence gathered by historian Mark Walker. Dramatised scenes, eyewitness accounts from Allied and German scientists, interviews and archive footage are all employed.

Ancient Megastructures The Alhambra

Certain landmarks have captured the imagination and awe of modern architects and engineers around the world as they work to solve the mystery of how their ancient forebears were able to construct such beautifultimeless and revolutionary structures with none of the machines and materials available to modern engineers. Episode The Alhambra – The Alhambra is the greatest example of Islamic military architecture in Europe. But just how did they construct such an impregnable fortress? In the Andalusian mountains of southern Spain, rises the majestic fort, which became a legend, Alhambra. This ancient citadel overlooks Granada. On the construction of its 37 towers and walls of the powerful took more than 150 years, but the Alhambra – it’s not only an impregnable fortress, this magnificent palace, with elegant courtyards and unfolded the bloody scene where the intrigue and the most famous of the surviving monuments of Muslim architecture in the western world.

Naked Science Episode 5 The Deadliest Shark

The series features various subjects related to science and technology. Some of the views expressed might be considered fringe or pseudo-science. Episode 5 The Deadliest Shark – Experts compare the deadliness of bullwhite, and tiger sharks, as well as profile their biology and behavior.

The Universe Episode 3 Magnetic Storm

We are in the midst of the greatest era of space discovery. Twenty first century spacecraft and sophisticated imaging technology are venturing into uncharted territory every dayand much of the extraordinary phenomena are happening right in our own cosmic backyard. Episode 6 Ten Ways to Destroy the Earth – Don’t try this at home! In this episode, our experts cook up ten ways you could destroy the earth, including: swallowing it with a microscopic black hole; blowing it up with anti-matter; hurling it into the Sun, and switching off gravity. This is a fun way to explore the dangerous physics of the Universe and the properties of the planet we call home.

The Birth Of Television

This programme celebrates the 40th anniversary of the official opening of BBC Television by tracing the history of the development of television from its conception in 1908thru the BBC’s official opening and its first broadcast in 1937. With contributions from John Rowe, Leslie Mitchell, John Rye and more.

History's Turning Points 1945 A.D. The Atomic Bomb

Each turning point in history has behind it a story and a set of principal characters whose dilemmas and conflicts form its dramatic coreand whose unique personalities influenced the outcome of events. History’s Turning Points provides a fascinating and intriguing new perspective on the significant moments that have changed the world. The Atomic Bomb – 1945 A.D. Without doubt, the Second World War was the most momentous event in U.S. history. Few single instants have marked so great and historic watershed as 915 a.m., August 6, 1945. Traditional war as an instrument of international policy ended completely, and future relations between nations changed drastically afterward.

Sci Fi Science Physics of the Impossible Series 1 Episode 3 Deep Impact

Science fiction isn’t just for the movies! Cyborgsshape shifting, the colonization of space and tons more really are possible. Dr. Kaku investigates the likelihood of popular sci-fi beliefs and ideas that currently seem beyond the realm of possibility, and shows us that these technologies could materialize sooner than we think. Featuring the latest research and most recent technologies, this series takes a look at things such as Lightsabers, Star Ships, Death Stars, and Warp Drives. Discover the science and realities behind these and other notions from the sci-fi world that are pushing the boundaries of technology and human ingenuity. Impossible? That’s what we said decades ago about man walking on the moon. Episode 3 Deep Impact – Dr Michio Kaku is on a mission to save planet Earth from dangers of asteroids and comets.

Wonders of the Solar System Episode 3 The Thin Blue Line

In this spellbinding series Professor Brian Cox visits the most extreme locations on Earth to explain how the laws of physics carved natural wonders across the solar system. Episode 3 The Thin Blue Line – The third episode looks at the atmosphere of the planets and moons of the Solar Systemwith Earth, Mars, and Titan being the main focus. The episode starts with Cox taking a journey in an English Electric Lightning piloted by Mike Beachy Head up to an altitude between 55 and 60 thousand feet where the “thinness and fragility” of the atmosphere could be observed in the middle of the day transitioning “from light blue to dark blue to black”. Laterthe Namib Desert is seen and used to give an explanation on how the Earth keeps its temperature, along with comparisons made to Mars. An in depth look at Titan is seen with footage shown from the Huygens probe descent down to the surface of the moon.

Modern Marvels Las Vegas

Modern Marvels celebrates the ingenuityinvention and imagination found in the world around us. This series tells fascinating stories of the doers, the dreamers and sometime schemers that create everyday items, technological breakthroughs and manmade wonders. Episode Las Vegas – From the neon sparkle of the Strip to the outrageous opulence of its penthouse suites this documentary takes the viewer to experience the incredible feats of engineering that underlie the world’s most unusual man made paradise Las Vegas. It is synonymous with fantasy folly and excess. Yet behind its facade of glamour and glitz stand massive monuments to architectural ingenuity and artistry. From its origins as a dusty Mormon cow town through its heyday as a mecca for the mob in the Rat Pack era to its modern renaissance as a family style playland. Explore the grandeur of Caesar’s Palace the colossal scale of the MGM Grand the spectacular mirrored splendor of the Luxor and many other wonders.

Stardate Mysteries of Venus

Stardate presents and examines the most intriguing planetsasteroids, stars and astrological phenomena in precise detail with the help of scientists and experts. This award winning series is a reliable source for information and trivia about the galaxy and is used in some astronomy classes. Some of the programs funded by the US government and produced with NASA, give the viewers a better grasp on the concepts of space. Episode Stardate: Mysteries of Venus – As the Venus Express spacecraft approaches its destination this documentary examines this most intriguing of planets and help find the answers to why a planet the same size, age and of similar composition to Earth has become our almost exact opposite. Why is it so hot? Could Venus’s runaway greenhouse effect one day happen on Earth? Why does the entire surface of the planet seem to have been resurfaced in one go? And do the opaque clouds which surround Venus host an even greater mystery: alien life? Presenter Adam Hart-Davis reports from a tense mission control in Germany as the spacecraft is manouvered into orbit.

Hitler’s Secret Science

In the crucible of World War IIGermany’s most brilliant scientists must race to create an arsenal of terrifying new weapons of mass destruction, even an atomic bomb. Before the war is over, Germany will produce a series of technological firsts that remain the basis for many modern day air and spacecraft, from a stealth-like trans-Atlantic bomber, to the world’s first cruise missile. Now, seventy years later, secret Nazi files reveal the classified blueprints for these, and many other, devastating Wonder Weapons. This documentary reveals the circumstances scientists faced under Hitler’s National Socialist partyand tracks amazing technological innovations from the beginning of the Third Reich through the modern postwar period. It highlights major scientific disciplines and designs, and the inventions of Wernher von Braun, Alexander Lippisch, Irene Bredt, Viktor Schauberger and Werner Heisenberg, among others.

Artifacts Episode 3 The Mystery of Porcelain

How did an Indian Buddhist shrine influence a Japanese pagoda? How are Italian pigs and cowry shells related to porcelain? Why did the ferocious warriors of Mongolia wear silk underwear? These intriguing questions are investigated in Artifactsa series that explores the origins and hidden connections among the art and artifacts of the great cultures and belief systems across Asia to understand the impact of calligraphy, porcelain, architecture, metallurgy, wood block printing and silk on Asian history and on the history of the world in general. Episode 3 The Mystery of Porcelain – When pieces of Chinese porcelain were first seen in the West, they were so rare and exquisite that they very quickly became more valuable than gold. Why? Because Europeans really had no idea how porcelain was made, and the medieval Italian merchants who first brought porcelain to Europe couldn’t believe it was man made.

Naked Science Episode 6 Bermuda Triangle

The series features various subjects related to science and technology. Some of the views expressed might be considered fringe or pseudo-science. Episode 6 Bermuda Triangle – Ships and planes vanish without a trace. The Triangle goes by many namesThe Vile Vortices or The Devil’s Triangle. There are also debates as to its boundaries. But at the centre of the myths and legends are the 450,000 square miles of island strewn ocean between Miami, Bermuda and Puerto Rico. Said to be a mysterious vortex claiming lives, ships, and planes at will. Some are never found, others turn up as gravestones on the ocean floor. Among such feared supernatural phenomena as UFOs and alien abduction, the Triangle is a serious contender. This programme sets out to unravel its secrets, finding out what lies behind the myth. Flying into the heart of the Bermuda Triangle.

The Universe Episode 5 Secrets of the Space Probes

We are in the midst of the greatest era of space discovery. Twenty first century spacecraft and sophisticated imaging technology are venturing into uncharted territory every dayand much of the extraordinary phenomena are happening right in our own cosmic backyard. Episode 6 Ten Ways to Destroy the Earth – Don’t try this at home! In this episode, our experts cook up ten ways you could destroy the earth, including: swallowing it with a microscopic black hole; blowing it up with anti-matter; hurling it into the Sun, and switching off gravity. This is a fun way to explore the dangerous physics of the Universe and the properties of the planet we call home.

The Chemistry of War

A snake is a perfect hunting machine armed and dangerous it functions day and night. This snake can lock onto it’s target in total darkness with natures equivalent of night goggles it tracks its victim using infa-red. It has heat sensors known as pit organs just above it’s moutha live animal is warm and the snakes senses are very accurate. The snake deploys a weapon that is quick and deadly with a minimum of contact all it has to do is wait. The weapon is a lethal chemical, venom. In natures wars of survival chemical weapons are deployed on every front. Chemical warfare is everywhere. Attack and defense, measure and counter measure. This is the story of an evolutionary arms race, of the tactics and strategies deployed in the natural world.