Genius Series Galileo

In 1564, the year that gave England Shakespeare, Galileo was born in Piza, in Italy the cradle of the Renaissance. But Galileo was pre-destined for trouble. His father was as argumentative as Galileo was to become. The open minded and broad education that the young Galileo was given in music, literature, art, and science guaranteed that he could never hold his tongue and suffer in silence. Most of his childhood went unrecorded but as a young boy his fascination with mechanics showed that his was an enquiring unfettered mind. It was this attitude that was to lead later to triumph and catastrophe.

In Search of Shakespeare Episode 2 The Lost Years

In Search of Shakespeare is a four part series exploring the life of the world’s greatest and most famous writer. It takes the form of a detective story, a documentary search, and a journey not the style of historical TV shows that use re-enactments and tableaux. There is no one dressed up as Will Shakespeare or Queen Elizabeth! Instead the Royal Shakespeare Company gives a group of Britain’s best young actors and actresses the chance to go on tje road and play in the places where his company played. Shot documentary style, on and off stage, the successors of Shakespeare’s company give us a magical glimpse into how it was done playing scenes from all Shakespeare’s great shows in Tudor Guildhalls, Royal Palaces like Hampton Court, and even in broad daylight. But the core of the series is a biography. The story of one Elizabethan, his life, family and friendships, his triumphs and disasters, his loves and his losses. Episode 2, The Lost Years – Shakespeare’s missing years have mystified scholars for centuries. Michael Wood explores conflicting theories of how Shakespeare spent the ten years between his marriage to Anne Hathaway and his emergence as a star writer in London.

What the Tudors Did For Us Episode 1 Seeying the Worlde

What an unruly lot! Beheadings, murder, divorce, rows with the Pope, civil war, fire and plague. The headline stories from the Tudor and Stuart years represent a roller-coaster ride through one of the most important periods of history in the development of modern Britain. Most know the bloody, battle filled history of the Tudor period, not many know the accomplishments of the period. Adam Hart-Davis travels through England in search of Tudor excellence in science, art, printing, exploration and more. Ranging from a shepherd’s discovery of graphite which led to the first pencil, to a fuller understanding of human anatomy once Henry VII legalized human dissection. Episode 1 Seeing the World – Before Tudor times the image people had of their world was, well, rather dark and mysterious, but that was about to change thanks to some incredible adventures and remarkable discoveries. Hart-Davis travels around Britain to introduce the idea and inventions of the Tudor Age in art, optics and exploration. The lens was added to the camera obscura by Giambattista della Porta in Natural Magic leading to fine arts and the first cinema. Mainland North America was discovered by John Cabot and possibly named after his investor Richard Americ. The first atlas (flat map) was drawn by Gerardus Mercator using the Mercator projection demonstrated by Hart-Davis. The first British colony in America was founded by Sir Walter Raleigh at Roanoke opening the New World to the Tudors. The perspective glass invented by Leonard Digges and demonstrated by Hart-Davis may have been the first telescope.

Ancient Warriors Series 2 Episode 12 The Highlanders

Each half hour episode looks at a major fighting people or force and charts the reasons for their rise to dominance and subsequent fall. The show explores the motivations of ancient soldiers, as well as how they lived, fought, trained, died, and changed the world. It also uses battle re-enactments and computer graphics to demonstrate military strategy. It is especially good for the lesser known groups of warriors. Episode 12 The Highlanders – Highlander efforts help free Scotland from English control. In the Scottish Highlands, where hatreds are as old than the hills, men die easier in feuds, where clan fights clan, only one hatred can unite them, the hatred of the English. Against the odds a band of warriors will help Scotland win it’s greatest victory and deal England one of its worst defeats.

Secrets Of The Dead Battle for the Bible

Presented by Rod Liddle, explores the life and times of the visionaries who fought a powerful and violent church establishment to publish the Bible in English. Their vocation, tenacity and sacrifice left a lasting impression on the language and literature in the centuries that followed. The inflections, cadences and familiar phrases of the first English Bible set the foundations for the way English has been spoken and written in the five centuries that followed its first publication. Perhaps its most important legacy, though, is the Protestant notion put by Jefferson God hath created the mind free. This underpinned the separation of church and state, the constitutional guarantee of freedom of expression and the right to fight for freedom of choice, freedom of conscience and freedom of speech.

The Ancient Skeletons of Peru

In the cloud forests of Peru the stone walls of a mysterious mountain top fortress rise out of the jungle. These 60 foot walls are filled with the bones of the Chachapoya, the Cloud Warriors, who lived high in the Andes from A.D. 800 to the mid 1500s. Only after an intense struggle did the powerful Incan empire gain control of the fiercely independent Chachapoya tribes. But did the Inca ever conquer the Chachapoya stronghold of Kuelap? Archaeologists at Kuelap have uncovered hundreds of elaborate burial sites throughout the settlement that reveal tantalising clues about the identity of the Chachapoya people and how and why they built such a massive fortress.

Great Artists with Tim Marlow Episode 2 Leonardo

A major 14 part television series in which art historian Tim Marlow takes a fresh look at the most important artworks of some of the greatest artists in history. Shot on location in over 50 galleries, museums, churches and palaces throughout Europe and the United States, this series is a comprehensive survey of the history of Western art. Both intelligent and informative, the series aims to provide an uncomplicated and accessible analysis of the works and artists featured including Giotto, Michelangelo and Raphael

Japan Memoirs of a Secret Empire Episode 1 The Way of the Samurai

Japan blossomed into its Renaissance at approximately the same time as Europe. Unlike the West, it flourished not through conquest and exploration, but by fierce and defiant isolation. And the man at the heart of this empire was Tokugawa Ieyasu, a warlord who ruled with absolute control. This period is explored through myriad voices the Shogun, the Samurai, the Geisha, the poet, the peasant and the Westerner who glimpsed into this secret world. Episode 1 The Way of the Samurai – Tokugawa Ieyasu unifies Japan and establishes a dynasty that will rule Japan for over 250 years.

What the Tudors Did For Us Episode 2 The Thynkyng Revolution

What an unruly lot! Beheadings, murder, divorce, rows with the Pope, civil war, fire and plague. The headline stories from the Tudor and Stuart years represent a roller-coaster ride through one of the most important periods of history in the development of modern Britain. Most know the bloody, battle filled history of the Tudor period, not many know the accomplishments of the period. Adam Hart-Davis travels through England in search of Tudor excellence in science, art, printing, exploration and more. Ranging from a shepherd’s discovery of graphite which led to the first pencil, to a fuller understanding of human anatomy once Henry VII legalized human dissection. Episode 2 The Thinkynge Revolution – Hart-Davis travels around Britain to introduce the idea and inventions of the Tudor Age in science, literature and education. The first printing press, like the one recreated at St Bride Printing Library, was brought to England by William Paxton. The resulting printing revolution included William Tyndale’s English bible that lead to the standardisation of the English language. State education was founded by Henry VIII providing opportunities for Christopher Marlowe and William Harvey amongst others. Modern medicine began from the Swiss Alchemist Paracelsus’ belief that minerals and chemicals could be used to treat diseases. Observational science came of age when Thomas Diggs recorded the first observation of a supernova.

Ancient Warriors Series 3 Episode 15 The Aztecs

Each half hour episode looks at a major fighting people or force and charts the reasons for their rise to dominance and subsequent fall. The show explores the motivations of ancient soldiers, as well as how they lived, fought, trained, died, and changed the world. It also uses battle re-enactments and computer graphics to demonstrate military strategy. This series from the Discovery Channel is especially good for the lesser known groups of warriors. Episode 15 The Aztecs – The Aztecs sacrifice captured enemies. “Dear son, you must understand that your home is not here where you have been born, for you are a warrior. You are a bird and the house where you have been born is just a nest. Your mission is to give the sun the blood of enemies to drink and to feed the earth with their bodies” In the time of Columbus, Europe discovered a strange new world, where every boy was born to fight and men fought for living flesh. Mortals to be sacrificed to slate the thirst of a god for blood.

The Conquerors Cortez Conqueror of Mexico

This documentary tour de force on the world’s greatest battles and the fearless men who won them. The Conquerors examines 12 legendary figures that altered the course of history through military brilliance and sheer willpower. Diary entries, interviews with scholars and heart-stopping reenactments examine the strategies, weapons of conquest and the significance of each engagement in the annals of history. Hosted by decorated war veteran Captain Dale Dye. Episode Cortes Conqueror of Mexico – See how a Conquistador ordered not to engage in combat destroyed the mightiest empire in the New World. He is one of the greatest conquerors in history, and among the most brutal. Hernan Cortes’ thirst for gold and power led him to Mexico in 1519, where he launched a conquest unlike any other in history. In approximately two years, Cortes owned the Aztec empire, and their once proud ruler Montezuma was dead. Through brilliant execution, from an often precarious military position, Cortes killed hundreds of thousands of Aztecs and brought down the 300 year old empire the first major American civilization to fall to the Spanish.

The Fall Of Constantinople Russian English Subtitles

With the conquest of Constatinople in 1204, during the 4th crusade the fall of the Byzantine Empire began. After 1430 the empire included only the city of Constantiople with its precincts and the Despotate of Moreas. John Palaiologos efforts to get help from the West through the union of churches caused great contrapositions in Constantinople among the people who were pro and against the union.

Great Artists with Tim Marlow Episode 4 Michelangelo

A major 14 part television series in which art historian Tim Marlow takes a fresh look at the most important artworks of some of the greatest artists in history. Shot on location in over 50 galleries, museums, churches and palaces throughout Europe and the United States, this series is a comprehensive survey of the history of Western art. Both intelligent and informative, the series aims to provide an uncomplicated and accessible analysis of the works and artists featured including Bruegal, Durer, El Greco, Giotto, Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raphael, Rembrandt, Rubens, Titian, Turner, Van Gogh, Velazquez & Vermeer.

The Most Evil Men and Women in History Vlad Tepest

This series of programs consists of 16 episodes which profile 16 evil men and women throughout history who have used their power to torture, kill, maim and eradicate millions of people. Vlad the Impaler – Vlad is best known for the legends of the exceedingly cruel punishments he imposed during his reign and for serving as the primary inspiration for the vampire main character in Bram Stoker’s popular Dracula novel.

Kings & Queens Of England Episode 6 Henry the Eighth 1509-1547

Series detailing the lives of 12 significant English rulers between 1066 and the present day. Dr. Nigel Spivey takes the viewer through the ages, describing the political intrigue, lust, battles and bloodshed that make up the histories of a millennium of monarchs. In a thousand years, the British monarchy has evolved from divinely appointed warrior kings to benign political figureheads. At the scenes of the decisive moments in British history, accompanied by dramatic reconstructions, he pieces together the incidents, battles and motivations that shaped our lives. Episode 6 Henry the Eighth, 1509 – 1547 – Chronicles the colorful career of larger than life monarch Henry VIII, whose long reign was characterized by opulence and excess, including the maintenance of 50 royal palaces and 1,000 courtiers and servants. Henry managed, however, to create the conditions necessary for peace and prosperity with feats of consummate diplomacy and, in the quest for a male heir, transformed Britain into a Protestant country by dissolving the monasteries and severing all links with Rome in an attempt to unite Church and State.

What the Tudors Did For Us Episode 3 War Machyne

What an unruly lot! Beheadings, murder, divorce, rows with the Pope, civil war, fire and plague. The headline stories from the Tudor and Stuart years represent a roller-coaster ride through one of the most important periods of history in the development of modern Britain. Most know the bloody, battle filled history of the Tudor period, not many know the accomplishments of the period. Adam Hart-Davis travels through England in search of Tudor excellence in science, art, printing, exploration and more. Ranging from a shepherd’s discovery of graphite which led to the first pencil, to a fuller understanding of human anatomy once Henry VII legalized human dissection. Episode 3 The Goode Lyfe – The Wars of the Roses concluded, Britain could finally afford to reap some of the rewards of civilization. In a climate of domestic peace England prospered, wealthy Tudor homeowners could worry less about defence and more about comfort. In this programme we see the vast opulence of the richest woman in Britian, Bess of Hardwicke, as well as the invention of tennis (originally played with kitchen sieves), horceracing, the theatre, and knitting. And of course what programme would be complete without an investigation of that perennial Hart-Davis obsession, the Water Closet.

Ancient Warriors Series 3 Episode 19 The Ninja Warriors of the Night

Each half hour episode looks at a major fighting people or force and charts the reasons for their rise to dominance and subsequent fall. The show explores the motivations of ancient soldiers, as well as how they lived, fought, trained, died, and changed the world. It also uses battle re-enactments and computer graphics to demonstrate military strategy. This series from the Discovery Channel is especially good for the lesser known groups of warriors. Episode 19 The Ninja Warriors of the Night – History of the Ninja warrior group. A thief is about to steal or die trying. Outside the victims window a gentle rain shower begins to fall. It seams the roof has sprung a leak. False alarm, but the sword is gone, the novice has passed the test and joins an invisible army, Ninjas the warriors of the night.

The Divine Michelangelo Episode 1

To produce one of the world’s great masterpieces is impressive. To create three is truly astonishing, but this is exactly what Michelangelo did five hundred years ago. With his own hands he designed and created, the David, the ceiling of the Sistine chapel, and the dome of St Peter’s. Episode 1 – Michelangelo’s path to success was plagued with difficulties. Trace the troubled origins of his genius, from boyhood beatings from his father, to fights with fellow artists. His father’s feeling that his obsession with art would bring disgrace to the family failed to deter the young, determined Michelangelo. The tempestuous young Michelangelo made a name for himself. Aged 26, he took on the seemingly impossible challenge of sculpting a colossal statue of the biblical hero, David, and design a structure to transport the sculpture, which weighed several tons, across the uneven roads without the giant crashing to the ground. It was no mean feat even by today’s standards. To illustrate the technical skills that Michelangelo displayed, the programme enlists engineer Nick McLean to follow in Michelangelo’s footsteps.

The Great Inca Rebellion

History reports that the mighty Inca were swiftly wiped out by a small band of Conquistadors. But, new evidence is being unearthed that may help rewrite history. Remains of those who died in battle have been discovered, and for the first time physical evidence is suggesting that Spain’s conquest of the Incan Empire may have actually taken twenty years. Brought to life through CGI reconstruction and reenactments, the untold epic saga of decades of guerilla warfare and rebellion are finally revealed as this documentary uncovers the truth behind the Inca’s last stand.

Great Artists with Tim Marlow Episode 5 Raphael

A major 14 part television series in which art historian Tim Marlow takes a fresh look at the most important artworks of some of the greatest artists in history. Shot on location in over 50 galleries, museums, churches and palaces throughout Europe and the United States, this series is a comprehensive survey of the history of Western art. Both intelligent and informative, the series aims to provide an uncomplicated and accessible analysis of the works and artists featured including Giotto, Michelangelo and Raphael

The Story of India Episode 5 The Meeting Of Two Oceans

The world’s largest democracy and a rising economic giant, India is now as well known across the globe for its mastery of computer technology as it is for its many armed gods and its famous spiritual traditions. Like other great civilizations had not just one but several brilliant golden ages in art and culture. Episode 5 The Meeting of Two Oceans – The fifth episode of the story of India takes us to the time of the Renaissance in Europe, when India was the richest, most populous civilization in the world. We visit the desert cities of Rajasthan and travel among the fabulous Mughal cities.

500 Nations Episode 2 Mexico

In September 2004, on the last remaining site on the Mall in Washington D.C., the Smithsonian Institution opened the National Museum of the American Indian, inaugurating a new era in the education of all people about Native America. In conjunction with this event, and in response to popular demand 500 nations was broadcast on the Discovery Channel. Episode 2 Mexico – Follow the dramatic and tragic history of the Mexican Indian nations from pre-Colombian times, through the period of European contact and colonization. Witness the rise and fall of the Toltecs and the growth of Tenochtitlan, the Aztec city of an empire.

Kings & Queens Of England Episode 7 Elizabeth the First 1558-1603

Series detailing the lives of 12 significant English rulers between 1066 and the present day. Dr. Nigel Spivey takes the viewer through the ages, describing the political intrigue, lust, battles and bloodshed that make up the histories of a millennium of monarchs. In a thousand years, the British monarchy has evolved from divinely appointed warrior kings to benign political figureheads. At the scenes of the decisive moments in British history, accompanied by dramatic reconstructions, he pieces together the incidents, battles and motivations that shaped our lives. Episode 7 Elizabeth the First, 1558 – 1603 – Of all England’s Kings and Queens, Elizabeth was the most famous. She was imperious, cunning, sexy, ruthless, and feminine. She has become the star of movies, books, television. She was above all supremely successful. Yet mysteries remain. How did she manage to prevail against such enourmous odds in a mans world, and why did she never marry? Was it because she was not fully a woman, or was it because to Elizabeth her virginity was always the key instrument of her power?