MegaStructures Built from Disaster Episode 6 Skyscrapers

Megastructures: Built from Disaster explores how accidents throughout the world have influenced the evolution of modern structural engineering. Skyscrapers Episode 6 – The titans of city architecture for over a centuryskyscrapers dominate urban landscapes throughout the world. No other building design so readily accommodates the voracious need for space in urban centres, but there can be a high price for this solution to overcrowded city life. Within such high and crowded structures, the consequences of engineering errors can be catastrophic.

The Pharaoh Who Conquered the Sea

Over three thousand years ago legend has it that Queen Hatshepsut, Egypt’s first female pharaoh, sent a fleet of ships to the wonderful, distant land of Punt. A bas-relief in the temple where she is entombed in Luxor shows them bringing back extraordinary treasures. But did this expedition really happen? And if it did, where exactly is the land of Punt?

Castle Episode 3 Caernarfon Conwy Harlech and Caerphilly

Presented by Marc Morris an excitingeye opening tour around Britain exploring the age of the medieval castle. Covering a period of six hundred years of British history, Marc charts the evolution of the medieval castle, from the primitive earth and timber motte and bailey castles to the formidable stone structures which still dominate the land today. Episode 3 – Historian Marc Morris explores how King Edward I’s relationship with a master builder led to the creation of some of the most famous castles in Britainincluding Caernarfon, Caerphilly and Harlech, fortresses used by the king as a formidable weapon to consolidate his conquests of Wales and its native dynasties.

Secrets of Lost Empires Series 2 Episode 5 Medieval Siege

In the seriesnova crews attempt to ferret out long forgotten secrets of early architects and engineers. How did they design and erect the medieval war machines known as trebuchets? Egyptian obelisks? The Easter Island stone monoliths called moais? Roman baths? The rainbow bridges of ancient China? Medieval Siege – In the Middle Ages, those who attacked castles used trebuchets, military engines capable of firing missiles with frightening force. In this section, view an actual trebuchet nova built, and construct and fire one of your own online. Also, find out what other weapons were used and what daily life was like in a medieval castle.

History's Turning Points 221 B.C. The Great Wall of China

Each turning point in history has behind it a story and a set of principal characters whose dilemmas and conflicts form its dramatic coreand whose unique personalities influenced the outcome of events. History’s Turning Points provides a fascinating and intriguing new perspective on the significant moments that have changed the world. The Great Wall of China – 221 B.C. To seal off his empire from marauders, Chin commanded the building of the Great Wall. Three hundred thousand were employed, and thousands, especially the scholars, died and were buried within the wall. Called the world’s longest graveyard it was his greatest accomplishment and his greatest tragedy.

What the Romans Did For Us Episode 3 Building Britain

This is where it all beganAdam Hart-Davis first foray, directly inspired by the Monty Python sequence from The Life of Brian where the People’s Front of Judea discuss “What have the Romans done for us?” into how the foundations of modern society were laid by the surprising cultural and technological achievements of the Roman empires. This is the first series of “What The … Did For Us” hosted by Adam Hart-Davis. Episode 3 Building Britain – Within 30 years of the invasion there were 60,000 Roman troops in Britain, they had come from some of the most advanced places in Europe, and to them this sort of settlement must have seemed primitive. This is the story of how they transformed the landscape and laid the foundations for the countryside and the cities Britain has today. Hart-Davis analyses the Romans’ ingenious farming methods and looks at the creation of early towns. He visits York and discovers the remains of the Roman city and a Roman sewer that is still working. Butser Ancient Farm, described as “an open air laboratory”this reconstructed Iron Age farm and settlement is an archaeological research project, investigating the ancient methods of Celtic farmers. Housesteads Roman Fort, Britain’s most intact Roman fort, all the more impressive for its clifftop location, built by Hadrian in the second century. Fire brigades and primitive fire extinguishers, demonstrated by Hart-Davis, were developed under the auspices of the Emperor Nero.

Ancient Megastructures The Great Pyramid

Certain landmarks have captured the imagination and awe of modern architects and engineers around the world as they work to solve the mystery of how their ancient forebears were able to construct such beautifultimeless and revolutionary structures with none of the machines and materials available to modern engineers. Episode Pyramids – The Great Pyramid of Giza is the only ancient Wonder of the World still standing. Can the architects cut and move the 2 million stones? Around the pyramids rise to many myths, but its real story is the story of triumph despite insurmountable obstacles, an outstanding human skills and an unquenchable thirst for one man to live forever.

Modern Marvels Eiffel Tower

Modern Marvels celebrates the ingenuityinvention and imagination found in the world around us. This series tells fascinating stories of the doers, the dreamers and sometime schemers that create everyday items, technological breakthroughs and manmade wonders. The hit series goes deep to explore the leading edge of human inspiration and ambition. Episode Eiffel Tower – When it was built over a century ago the Eiffel Tower provoked widespread outrage among some of France’s most prominent citizens of the day. This documentary brings the captivating story behind one of the most recognizable engineering marvels of the late nineteenth century. It is a monumental tale of the technological challenges and architectural breakthroughs brought about by the construction of this preeminent hallmark of the City of Lights.

The Secrets of Hadrian’s Wall

It is unique in the Roman World. A spectacular and complex stone barrier measuring 74 miles longand up to 15 feet high and 10 feet thick. For 300 years Hadrian’s Wall stood as the Roman Empire’s most imposing frontier and one of the unsung wonders of the ancient world. Almost 2,000 years after it was built, Hadrian’s Wall is proving to be a magical time capsule – a window into the human past. Archaeologists have properly excavated less than 1per cent of it, but they have unearthed extraordinary findings. With presenter Julian Richards Timewatch journeys back through time to unlock the secrets of a lost world.

Cathedral Fire At York

The history of Britain and the aspirations of her Christian communities can be traced in the glorious excesses of the cathedrals. From Norman grandeur to the modern interpretations found in Liverpool and Coventryexplore the changing styles of the cathedrals in our midst. A 5 part series that takes a looks at the ingenuity behind the construction of Britain’s most famous cathedrals, using CGI and reconstructions to describe the dramatic stories of riot, fire, war, murder, and flood that shaped the history of these impressive masterpieces. Fire at York – In 1829, non-conformist Jonathan Martin set fire to York Minster to protest against what he saw as the greed and complacency of the clergy. At the same time, antiquarian John Browne embarked on his journey to discover how the cathedral had been designed and built. This is the story of Martin and the trial that would lead to either execution or the asylum, and of Browne and his determination to crack the mason’s code that he believed lay embedded in the structure of the Minster.

Secrets Of The Dead Lost Ships of Rome

In 2009a team of marine archaeologists carrying out a sonar survey of the seabed around the Italian island of Ventotene made an astonishing discovery. The wrecks of five ancient Roman ships were found in pristine condition. Remarkably, much of the cargo remained exactly as the ancient Roman crews had loaded it. What happened to these ancient ships? What were they carrying and why had they traveled to this remote, rocky island in the first place? Lost Ships of Rome follows the team as they explore the sites in detail, salvage artifacts and piece together the history of the ships and why they were lost at Ventotene two thousand years ago.

History's Turning Points 1453 A.D. The Siege of Constantinople

Each turning point in history has behind it a story and a set of principal characters whose dilemmas and conflicts form its dramatic coreand whose unique personalities influenced the outcome of events. History’s Turning Points provides a fascinating and intriguing new perspective on the significant moments that have changed the world. The Siege of Constantinople – 1453 AD In 1204 crusaders sacked the city, then renamed Constantinople. For the next thousand years, the Byzantine Kings hid safely behind the massive walls of Constantinople. Then in 1453, with the Turkish Ottoman Empire encircling the city, Sultan Mehmet brought the newest technology of the 15th century, the cannon, and finally brought down the walls of the world’s most impregnable fortress.

What the Romans Did For Us Episode 4 Arteries of the Empire

This is where it all beganAdam Hart-Davis first foray, directly inspired by the Monty Python sequence from The Life of Brian where the People’s Front of Judea discuss “What have the Romans done for us?” into how the foundations of modern society were laid by the surprising cultural and technological achievements of the Roman empires. This is the first series of “What The … Did For Us” hosted by Adam Hart-Davis. Episode 4 Arteries of the Empire – Hart-Davis analyses the Romans’ ingenious surveying methods that enabled them to build their arrow-straight roads. Groma surveyingdemonstrated by Hart-Davis, allowed the surveying of perfectly straight roads such as Watling Street and Stane Street. The construction of Roman roads, demonstrated by Hart Davis, has allowed them to endure to this day. He also commissions a replica of an ingenious giant water wheel used to remove water from flooded Welsh gold mines. The remains of a Roman fortification dating back to their first century landing, as well as a museum of Roman life.

Ancient Mysteries Guardian of the Ages: The Great Sphinx

On the eastern base of the Giza plateau below the pyramid complex is another stunning symbol of ancient Egypt the great sphinx. There are many theories as to the origin of this magnificent monument but the truth remains hidden behind the stony stare of this desert’s most impressive lion. This strange sculpturethis mysterious mixture of man and beast, crouches in front of the pyramid complex of Khafra quietly keeping the secret of it’s true significance. In Ancient Egypt sphinx’s were traditionally guardians. For the Greeks it was thought to be a representation of occult wisdom, for the Medieval Arabs it was Abu el-Hol or Father of Terror. But in the beginning experts say it was nothing more than an outcrop of rock, the remains of an ancient quarry. Rather than removing it completely, an ancient Egyptian with vision thought they could do something with it. The result of that vision is the colossus that seems to effortlessly transform animal into man.

Modern Marvels The Golden Gate Bridge

Modern Marvels celebrates the ingenuityinvention and imagination found in the world around us. This series tells fascinating stories of the doers, the dreamers and sometime schemers that create everyday items, technological breakthroughs and manmade wonders. The hit series goes deep to explore the leading edge of human inspiration and ambition. Episode The Golden Gate Bridge – The Golden Gate Bridge is one of the foremost man, made tourist attractions in the United States. But at one time, critics said it could never be built. From the start, the project looked impossible. Yet engineer Joseph B. Strauss’ plans proved to be a masterpiece of design and function. In four years, the longest, highest, most spectacular suspension bridge on earth opened to the public, and became one of the greatest symbols of American ingenuity.

What Sank the Mary Rose?

The Mary Rosebuilt five centuries ago and named after the favourite sister of Henry VIII, was a forerunner of today’s battleships. A team of experts from the fields of shipbuilding, science, history and archaeology gather to study the evidence and try to pin down the reason for the disaster. Using a scaled down model of the Mary Rose, forensic scientists reconstruct the ship’s last voyage, and a tragic picture emerges of her final moments.In a cellar under a naval dockyard are some of the remains of an English warship that mysteriously sank in 1545 taking over 400 with her the reason the ship sank has never been fully explained over the centuries the french the crew and even the shipwrights have all been blamed for the catastrophe only now are archeologist and scientist beginning to come up with new evidence to explain one of the great disasters of sea warfare The sinking of the Mary Rose.

Cathedral Flood at Winchester

The history of Britain and the aspirations of her Christian communities can be traced in the glorious excesses of the cathedrals. From Norman grandeur to the modern interpretations found in Liverpool and Coventryexplore the changing styles of the cathedrals in our midst. A 5 part series that takes a looks at the ingenuity behind the construction of Britain’s most famous cathedrals, using CGI and reconstructions to describe the dramatic stories of riot, fire, war, murder, and flood that shaped the history of these impressive masterpieces. Flood at Winchester – Home of England’s first Kings, Winchester cathedral stood for a thousand years as a proud symbol of national identity. But in the early 1900s it faced total destruction when it was discovered that the building was literally sinking into the swamp on which it had been constructed. This ancient architectural gem owes its survival to the bravery, ingenuity and endurance of one man, working diver William Robert Walker, who put his life on the line to save a piece of England’s history. This is the extraordinary story of the cathedral that began to sink and of the incredible underwater adventure that was launched to save it.

Seven Wonders Of The Industrial World Episode 1 The Great Ship

The period of over 125 years from the beginning of the 19th century saw the creation of some of the world’s most remarkable feats of engineering. Seven of the most notable are described here each one proving that human creativity is as much alive in the modern world as it was in ancient times. Episode 1 The Great Ship – In the early 1850s, Brunel hoped the Great Eastern would be his masterpiece, and that it would provide an enduring link to even the most far flung parts of the empire. His concept became the blue print for ship design for years to come. At a time when most ships moored in the Thames were built to traditional designs in wood, and powered by sail, Brunel’s Great Ship was almost 700 feet long, a floating island made of iron.

Lost Cities Of The Ancients The Dark Lords of Hattusha

Documentary series which unearths lost civilizations and reveals the wonder of some of the world’s greatest lost cities The Dark Lords of Hattusha – Profile of the ancient Hittite civilizationlooking at what archaeologists found when they uncovered the lost capital of Hattusha, including temples, palaces and a pyramid like structure facing Egypt. The historians also discovered a library, charting the rise and fall of the empire, which vanished 3,000 years ago. Last in series The story of the formidable Hittites and the rediscovery of their capital, Hattusha.

What the Victorians Did For Us Episode 1 The Speed Merchant

What the Victorians Did for Us examines the impact of the Victorian era on modern society. It concentrates primarily on the scientific and social advances of the erawhich bore the Industrial Revolution and set the standards for polite society today. When Victoria came to the throne in 1837, Britain was on the brink of world supremacy in the production of iron, steel, and steam engines, and had seen an explosion of growth and developments that included railways, the electric telegraph, and wool production. The tremendous feeling of national pride was celebrated in the Great Exhibition of 1851. Drawing on his consummate skill as a storyteller, Adam Hart-Davis shows how Victorian movers and shakers changed our world. Episode 1 Speed Merchants – Focuses on the Victorian obsession with speed, and the impact of steam power on farming. After visiting the last steam-powered mill in the country, Adam experiences the legacy of Brunel’s Great Western Railway, and sees if a project to build a steam-powered plane can ever get off the ground.

Ancient Secrets China’s Lost Pyramids

In Chinathere exists an astonishing place. A burial ground to rival Egypt’s Valley of the Kings. In 221 B.C., China’s first Emperor united warring kingdoms into a nation that still exists today. To memorialise this achievement, he bankrupted the national treasury and oppressed thousands of workers to build one of the world’s biggest mortuary complexes. China’s second dynasty, the Han, inherited the daunting challenge of building larger tombs to command respect and establish their right to rule without running the nation into the ground. Although no Han emperor’s tomb has been opened, the tombs of lesser Han aristocrats have revealed astonishing things and at least one corpse so amazingly well preserved some believe Han tomb builders knew how to engineer immortality.

Modern Marvels Three Mile Island

They make everyones lives more comfortablemore rewarding, and more secure. They are the magical machines that have bring the edge of the new frontier of limitless possibilities. But it is a hinterland filled with dangers and demons of humanity’s own creation. Based on the popular book Inviting Disaster by James Chiles, in this episode Modern Marvels explore the nuclear nightmares of Three Mile Island and Chernobyl.

Cathedral Murder at Canterbury

The history of Britain and the aspirations of her Christian communities can be traced in the glorious excesses of the cathedrals. From Norman grandeur to the modern interpretations found in Liverpool and Coventryexplore the changing styles of the cathedrals in our midst. A 5 part series that takes a looks at the ingenuity behind the construction of Britain’s most famous cathedrals, using CGI and reconstructions to describe the dramatic stories of riot, fire, war, murder, and flood that shaped the history of these impressive masterpieces. Murder at Cantebury – Canterbury was at the forefront of an architectural revolution the first Gothic cathedral to be built in Britain. But the building we know today has its origins in the most infamous murder of the medieval age – Thomas Becket in 1170. After his death a devastating fire meant that Canterbury could be rebuilt as a shrine to the martyred archbishop. This is the cathedral as theatre with the story of the murder etched in stone, marble and glass. It takes the pilgrim on a journey from darkness into light – from the horrors of the slaying in the North transept to the new Trinity Chapel where Becket was reburied in a magnificent tomb sparkling with gold and precious stones.

Seven Wonders Of The Industrial World Episode 2 The Brooklyn Bridge

The period of over 125 years from the beginning of the 19th century saw the creation of some of the world’s most remarkable feats of engineering. Seven of the most notable are described hereeach one proving that human creativity is as much alive in the modern world as it was in ancient times. Episode 2 The Brooklyn Bridge – John Roebling from Germany, won the contract to build the largest bridge in the world, the Brooklyn Bridge in New York. It was to stretch 1,600 feet, in one giant leap, across the wide and turbulent East River that separates New York from Brooklyn. At the time such a bold design seemed almost miraculous, and all to be built out of a new material, steel.