Scotland’s Forgotten War

60 years after the Korean WarJackie Bird investigates why one of the biggest conflicts of the 20th century has slipped from public memory. The war, in which thousands of young Scottish national servicemen fought, caused more British deaths than the Afghan, Iraq and Falklands wars combined. Jackie Bird discovers her own personal connection to the conflict and traces what happened to one of its forgotten victims. She also travels to Korea with some of the surviving Scottish veterans, on an emotional journey to reclaim their past. Although their numbers are dwindling with the passage of time, many of the Korean War veterans still have to come to terms with a war the rest of the country has largely forgotten.

What Sank the Mary Rose?

The Mary Rosebuilt five centuries ago and named after the favourite sister of Henry VIII, was a forerunner of today’s battleships. A team of experts from the fields of shipbuilding, science, history and archaeology gather to study the evidence and try to pin down the reason for the disaster. Using a scaled down model of the Mary Rose, forensic scientists reconstruct the ship’s last voyage, and a tragic picture emerges of her final moments.In a cellar under a naval dockyard are some of the remains of an English warship that mysteriously sank in 1545 taking over 400 with her the reason the ship sank has never been fully explained over the centuries the french the crew and even the shipwrights have all been blamed for the catastrophe only now are archeologist and scientist beginning to come up with new evidence to explain one of the great disasters of sea warfare The sinking of the Mary Rose.

Absolute Zero Episode 1 The Conquest Of Cold

Air-conditioningrefrigeration, and superconductivity are just some of the ways technology has put cold to use. But what is cold, how do you achieve it, and how cold can it get? This documentary series explores these and other facets of the frigid. It follows the quest for cold from the unlikely father of air-conditioning, the court magician of King James I of England in the 17th century, to today’s scientists pioneering super fast computing in the quantum chill. The program is based on the definitive book on cold: Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold by Tom Shachtman. Episode 1 The Conquest of Cold – opens in the 1600s when the nature of cold and even heat were a complete mystery. Are they different phenomena or aspects of some unified feature of nature? The experiments that settled these questions helped stoke the Industrial Revolution. This episode includes Cornelius Drebbel’s spooky trick of turning summer into winter for the English king, Antoine Lavoisier’s battle with Count Benjamin Rumford over the caloric theory of heat, and Michael Faraday’s explosive experiments to liquefy gases, which established the principles that make refrigerators possible.

Bible Mysteries The Disciples

Bible Mysteries is a series of programs exploring great figures and events from biblical times. Historicalarchaeological and anthropological evidence combined with stylish drama re-enactments, CGI graphics and expert opinion offers a comprehensive exploration into some of the Bible’s most compelling people and stories and gives fresh insights into the historical realities of the times. Episode The Disciples – Nobody knows for sure just how long Jesus’ ministry, teaching and traveling throughout Israel, lasted. Some say three years others as little as one. That Christianity grew, after such a brief inception, into the world religion we know to today is testimony to the power of the message Jesus preached. But it is also due to a much simpler and often over looked fact. He had more than a little help from his friends.

Egypt Episode 3 The Pharaoh and the Showman

Egypt is the title of a BBC television drama serial about various archaeological discoveries taking place in that country’s history with the occasional flashback scene involving actors portraying the ancient Egyptians themselves. Episode 3 The Pharaoh and the Showman – A dissatisfied Belzoni leaves England with his wifeSarah, and servant, James Curtin, to see the world. Belzoni is hired to recover the massive Head of Memnon, later revealed to be a statue of the Pharaoh Ramesses the Great, as a gift for the British Museum.

In Search of the Trojan War Episode 3 The Singer of Tales

Homer wrote his epicThe Iliad, in 700 BC 500 years after the Trojan Wars were supposed to have taken place. Did the Trojan war ever happen,or was the city destroyed by natural causes? It’s fascinated poets, painters and Hollywood directors for over 2,500 years. Join Michael Wood as he combs the cradle of civilization from Greece to Turkey and points beyond Germany, Ireland and England in search of archaeological evidence that may validate the fantastic battles immortalized in The Iliad From Schliemann’s initial cavalier bulldozing of the mound at Hisarlik, to Homer’s epics, the Hittite Empire, and the role of slave women, Wood journeys back and forth across the Aegean and elsewhere to illuminate the dawn of Western literature, myth, and history. The Singer of Tales – The role and long time fidelity of oral traditions. Homer’s reliability challenged.

Our War Episode 2 The Invisible Enemy

This seriesfirst aired in 2011, marks a decade of fighting in Afghanistan with a unique insight into the war told through films shot by the soldiers themselves. The BBC was given unprecedented access by the Ministry of Defence to thousands of hours of footage shot on helmet cameras and personal video cameras by soldiers. With the raw honesty of first person stories of life on the front line, the series offers a gripping and poignant insight into every side of the young soldiers’ experience, the average age is 21, from fear to boredom, grief to bravery, the camaraderie of the platoon and the return home. Episode 2 The Invisible Enemy – Follows the plight of the first troops sent to Helmand Province in 2006 and shows how, three years later, Improvised Explosive Devices, IEDs had changed the war. A small platoon entered the town of Sangin in 2006 equipped to stay for a few days but ended up staying months, under heavy bombardment. As they struggle to survive, a supply drop off lands behind enemy lines by mistake. Later, in 2009, Captain Alex Rawlins films his men from 1st Battalion, the Grenadier Guards under threat from the increasing number of IEDs in Helmand Province. They lost of one their mates, 23 year old Guardsman Jamie Janes, who stood on a landmine during a patrol. The film shows how Jamie Janes’s death became a turning point in the British public’s awareness of the human cost of IEDs and how a misspelled letter turned into a political storm for the then Prime Minister, Gordon Brown.

Seven Wonders Of The Industrial World Episode 3 Bell Rock Lighthouse

The period of over 125 years from the beginning of the 19th century saw the creation of some of the world’s most remarkable feats of engineering. Seven of the most notable are described here each one proving that human creativity is as much alive in the modern world as it was in ancient times. Episode 3 The Bell Rock – Lighthouse that was created off the east coast of Scotland bringing light to the treacherous coast. The Bell Rock, a large reef 11 miles out to sea, dangerously positioned in the approach to the Firth of Forth. In 1799, over 70 ships went down in a violent storm that raged along the coast, yet still the authorities opposed the plan. Battling against the odds, Stevenson did eventually build his lighthouse, and to this day it shines out across the North Sea, the oldest offshore lighthouse still standing anywhere in the world.

The Curse of Oil Episode 3 The Wilderness

Three part series that goes exploring the world’s oil producing regions beyond the familiar territory of the Middle East. Unlike other documentaries that are full of gloomy predictions of perishable reserves of oil. Bill Cran’s series takes the view that there are ample supplies of oil, the problem is that most of it lies in the wrong places. Requiring the first world to deal with nasty governments or destroying the wilderness. But the relationship between oil companies, consumers and those who live where the oil is extracted is changing very rapidly. It is becoming possible for native populations to obstruct oil companies. The series concludes there are no easy answers. Episode 3 The Wilderness – Examines how political instabilities in the Middle East have led companies to search for oil elsewhere. In Alaska, the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is soon to be the site of extensive development, despite protests from environmentalists and locals fearing for their way of life. Meanwhile, in Alberta a huge oil reserve has been discovered deep beneath an ancient forest, but getting at it could well be the most environmentally damaging operation in history.

The Normans Episode 3 Normans Of The South

Professor Robert Bartlett embarks on an ambitious journey deep into the hearts and minds of a band of warriors who transformed medieval Europe. He draws on Anglo-Saxon chronicles medieval manuscripts and some of the most powerful examples of Norman architecture in an epic sweep of the period of Norman supremacy. And he reveals how the Norman legacy lives on in our culture and politics to this day. Episode 3 Normans of the South – Professor Robert Bartlett explores the impact of the Normans on southern Europe and the Middle East. The Normans spread south in the 11th century, winning control of southern Italy and the island of Sicily. There they created their most prosperous kingdom, where Christianity and Islam coexisted in relative harmony and mutual tolerance. It became a great centre of medieval culture and learning. But events in the Middle East provoked the more aggressive side of the Norman character.

Who Do You Think You Are? Boris Johnson

Who Do You Think You Are? is a British genealogy documentary series. In each episodea celebrity traces their family tree. Episode Boris Johnson – He compares himself to a jar of honey found on a supermarket shelf, the product of many countries. He thinks he is part Jewishpart French, part English, part American, part pterodactyl and, unpredictably, part Turkish. He knows that his grandfather, “Johnny”was the son of a Turkish journalist and politician who was ultimately kidnapped and lynched in the early 1920s, but knows little about his life, reputation and the circumstances of his death. He learns more about the political climate of his great-grandfather’s era in Turkey and discovers personal details about his life and death. Returning to western Europe, Boris sets off in search of the truth about Granny Butter’s background, and follows an intriguing family trail that leads him to a surprising conclusion.

Hitler’s Bomb

In December 1938in Berlin, a simple chemical experiment showed for the first time that the atom can be split, releasing immense power. Within months, the Wehrmacht had started research into nuclear weapons. The Germans were the first to start work on the atom bomb. The programme investigates the reasons why Hitler was not the first leader to use it, drawing on new evidence gathered by historian Mark Walker. Dramatised scenes, eyewitness accounts from Allied and German scientists, interviews and archive footage are all employed.

The Harlot’s Handbook

Historian Hallie Rubenhold reveals the story behind the 18th century’s most infamous book Harris’s Listsa catalogue describing the talents and attributes of London’s prostitutes. Created by a pimp, a prostitute and a poet, the Lists became an instant bestseller – even though they contained lurid and often disturbing descriptions of the lives of the common courtesans. Rubenhold uses the details found within the Lists to produce a vivid depiction of the steamy underside of Georgian life.

Ancient Rome The Rise and Fall of an Empire Episode 4 Revolution

This is the 6 episode BBC docudrama with voiceovernot the 13 episode History channel documentary with recreations. The rise and fall of Ancient Rome through six key turning points. Factually accurate and based on extensive historical research, it reveals how the greed, lust and ambition of men like Caesar, Nero and Constantine shaped the Roman Empire. CGI is mixed with compelling drama and spectacular live-action battles. Episode 4 Revolution – In an age before Rome was ruled by emperors young Tiberius Gracchus had been brought up to respect his father’s principles of honour and justice, but in just 20 years he will die defending his father’s ideals, murdered by the aristocrats standing behind him, his crime, starting a revolution so powerful it changed Rome forever, setting on the path to its greatest triumphs and worst excesses.

Chased by Sea Monsters Episode 3 To Hell … And Back?

Chased By Sea Monsters a.k.a. Sea Monsters: A Walking with Dinosaurs Trilogy is about Nigel Marven travelling back in time to visit the seven deadliest prehistoric seas. He travels to those time periods on a boat called The Ancient Marinera 24 metre long boat with a crew. His means of time travel is never shown but the closest thing to it is his time map, that show the seven deadliest seas and the creatures that live in them. Epiosde 3 To Hell… and Back? – This episode starts with Nigel still in the Pliocene still trying to attach a camera to a Megalodon. The episode then moves on to the Jurassic where Nigel comes face to face with the giant fish Leedsichthys, the marine croc Metriorhynchus and the giant monster Liopleurodon. The episode concludes in the Cretaceous, Hell’s Aquarium.

Guilty Pleasures Luxury in Ancient Greece

Luxury isn’t always a question of the expensive and beautiful for the rich and powerful it’s always been much more and more important than that. The story of luxury is about an idea that touches on democracy and patriotism on social harmony and epic courage and even on the divine. Because it is so important there has always been more than one definition of what luxury actually is. One thing all can agree on is that luxury is a rare thing, it divides society into the haves and have nots. Host Cambridge University academic Dr Michael Scott asks the question Do we love luxury or hate it or both? He presents the view that the best way to understand today’s anxious response toward luxury is to think about how it operated in the past and to understand how that past continues to impact society today. Episode Luxury in Ancient Greece – follows the debate about luxury which convulsed ancient Greece from the beginning of the classical era. In Athens it explores the role of luxury in the beginnings of democracy how certain kinds of luxury came to be forbidden and others embraced. A simple luxury like meat could unite the democracy, and yet a taste for fish could divide it. Some luxuries were associated with effeminacy and foreigners, others with the very idea of democracy.

Landscape Mysteries Episode 2 Figures in the Chalk

Professor Aubrey Manning embarks on a series of journeys in which he tries to solve mysteries hidden in the landscape of the British Isles. Unpicking clues in the geologynatural history, and archaeology, Aubrey reveals how the land has come to look the way it does. Episode 2 Figures In The Chalk – Aubrey travels to the Chalk Hills of England to unravel the origins of the enigmatic chalk figures such as the Long Man of Wilmington and the Cerne Abbas Giant in Dorset. The age of these chalk figures has never been fully established and Aubrey, alongside a team of archaeologists from Reading University, come up with a remarkable new discovery.

People's Century Episode 13 Freedom Now 1947

A departure from other documentaries that observe history as the actions of great men People’s Century considers the Century from the view of common people. Most persons interviewed were ordinary men and women who closely witnessed various events and they give personal accounts how developments in the Twentieth Century affected their lives. The opening credits depict various images from the century and a very short introduction. Episode 13 Freedom Now 1947 – European powers are forced to relinquish their colonies in Africa following the Second World War, but in most cases the newly independent countries would eventually succumb to poverty, civil war and despotic regimes. India’s independence motivates a generation of war veterans from Africa, who for the first time have travelled the world, to seek greater autonomy for their own countries. The Europeans are at first reluctant to surrender colonies that supports their prosperity, although Asia is decolonised in the 1950s. The British give reforms to the Gold Coast (now Ghana), which under Kwame Nkrumah would lead the way to independence, and ultimately become an example to the rest of Africa. Kenya’s path to independence would not be without blood, and the British fight the Mau Mau to protect the numerically small white population. France and Portugal both struggle to keep their colonies. Within three years, 25 African states would become independent from their colonial masters, but tribal hatreds, corruption, a lack of a skilled workforce and internal conflict often lead these countries to ruin. The introductory scene shows India’s path towards independence. Interviewees include Komla Gbedema and E. T. Mensah.

Suez: A Very British Crisis Episode 1 Betrayal

The Suez crisis in the 1950s signaled the end of Britain’s history as a power that could act alone on the world stage. This series tells the story of Suez using dramatic reconstructions and interviews with participants and witnesses to the crisis. The Suez Canal in Egypt was a symbol of western dominance. France and Britain were the major shareholders in the company that ran the canal and British troops occupied its banks. When Gamal Abdul Nasser came to power in 1954his main objective was to remove the British from Egypt. The British Prime Minister, Anthony Eden, did not understand that the world had changed. Episode 1 Betrayal – Friends and intimates of both Nasser and Eden recall the events that put them on a collision path. For Eden, Nasser was a threat to peace in the Middle East. For Nasser, Eden was standing in the way of securing his country’s future. When Britain and America refused to help Nasser to finance his ambitious project to build the Aswan Dam, it was the last straw.

The Great War Episode 6 So Sleep Easy In Your Beds

First broadcast in 1964The Great War was the definitive film account of the world shattering events of World War I (1914 – 1918) a landmark history series widely regarded as a documentary masterpiece. 26 Episodes. The main narrator was Michael Redgrave. It was a co-production involving the resources of the Imperial War Museum, the BBC, CBC and ABC. The series, unparalleled at the time for its depth of research, range of source material and historical accuracy – all presented in a sequence of clear narratives – is now considered one of the finest achievements of BBC documentary. With few exceptions, successive blocks of episodes are devoted to each year of the war episodes 1 – 6 to 1914, 7 – 10 to 1915, 11 – 14 to 1916, 15 – 19 to 1917, 20 – 23 and 26 to 1918.

Wales To Timbuktu Episode 1

From Wales to Timbuktu is a two part series about the meeting of two cultures through the eyes and words of teenagers from mid Wales. In February 2009four specially selected students travelled to Mali in Africa, on a 10 day literary adventure. Their aim was to immerse themselves in the culture of Timbuktu, Hay-on-Wye’s twin town. They recorded their experiences, observations and revelations by keeping diaries and writing notes. Key to their experience was the guidance of a writing mentor Tom Bullough a published author from Powys. Hay-on-Wye and Timbuktu are twinned not just as municipalities but also through their fundamental association with literature and the world of books. Timbuktu is the oldest home of the written word in Africa.

A303 Highway To The Sun

The A303 is the road that passes Stonehenge on the way to the beaches of Devon and Cornwall. On the wayit whisks drivers through 5,000 years of remarkable moments in British history. And it is the star of this film made for armchair travelers and history lovers. Writer Tom Fort drives its 92 mile length in a lovingly restored Morris Traveller. Along the way he has many adventures, he digs up the 1960s master plan for the A303’s dreams of superhighway status, meets up with a Neolithic traveler who knew the road like the back of his hand, gets to know a section of the Roman 303, uncovers a medieval murder mystery, and discovers what lies at the end of the Highway to the Sun.

Nikola Tesla The Genius Who Lit the World

Nikola Tesla was born on July 10,1856 in Smiljan, Lika in what later became Yugoslavia. Tesla studied at the Polytechnic Institute in Graz, Austria and the University of Prague. While in Strassbourg in 1883, he privately built a prototype of the induction motor and ran it successfully. Unable to interest anyone in Europe in promoting this radical device Tesla accepted an offer to work for Thomas Edison in New York. Young Nikola Tesla came to the United States in 1884. Tesla will spend the next 59 years of his productive life living in New York. Electricity today is generated, transmitted and converted to mechanical power by means of his inventions. Tesla’s greatest achievement is his polyphase alternating current system, which is today lighting the entire globe.

The Queen Mother: A Woman Of Her Century

Starts with an old fashioned British Pathe title card and plays just like an old extended newsreel. No controversyno real questioning of the Queen Mother’s motives or choices, but an interesting first in depth look. Labelled by Hitler as the most dangerous woman in Europe but known more affectionately as the Little Duchess then the Queen Mother she reinvigorated the Royal Family. This is the story of how the nation’s favourite grandmother carved a place in her nation’s hearts forever. A Woman of her Century is a biographical celebration of her long and distinguished life.

A History of Britain Episode 2 Conquest

From the dawn of civilization to the 20th century A History of Britain re-animates familiar tales and illuminates overlooked aspects of England’s past. Hosted by Simon Schama it spotlights the epic themes and towering figures that transformed an island at the edge of the world into the greatest empire on earthexamining the impact of this extraordinary heritage on the modern nation. Episode 2 Conquest – The Battle of Hastings in 1066, which saw King Harold beaten after leading an army worn out from fighting his brother Tostig and a horde of Vikings, to confront William the Conqueror. The Saxon defeat led to 300 years of Norman rule and a country plagued by massacre and famine, but the rulers managed to keep an inventory of all land and possessions, better known as the Domesday Book.

Battlefield Britain Episode 2 Medieval Warfare At The Battle of Hastings

Battlefield Britain is about famous battles in the history of Great Britain. From Boudicca’s destructive rebellion against the Romans to the incredible feats of The Few who saw off the Luftwaffethese battles all had wide reaching consequences and implications for the future of the British isles. Presented by father and son team Peter and Dan Snow. Peter explains the battleplans, Dan the perspective of the common soldier, sailors and airmen. The episodes also featured interviews with soldiers from both sides, re-enactments of the battles and computer generated scenes with bird eye views and blocks to show troop movement. Episode 2 The Battle of Hastings – Heralding the beginning of the Norman Conquest, the Battle of Hastings in 1066, when William the Conqueror faced King Harold on the south coast, was one of the bloodiest and most important battles ever fought on British soil.

Dragons Alive Episode 1 Ruling Reptiles

They attack their victims with great strength and speedusing even chemical weapons. To avoid their enemies they can run over the water, throw him blood or poison or just become one with their environment and disappear. They attract their mate giving an extraordinary show of colors and movements and they have superhero abilities as they fly and use X-rays to see. Today’s reptiles are as deadly as dinosaurs, as beautiful as birds and as tender as mammals. Their look is so ancient that it is hard to believe that these animals are true! Episode 1 Ruling Reptiles – The extinction of the dinosaurs left a power vacuum. Enter the dragons: powerful modern reptiles which still dominate large areas of our planet. Ruling Reptiles goes in search of the modern reptiles that have inherited the dominant role.

Medieval Season Illuminations Treasures Of The Middle Ages

Art critic Andrew Graham-Dixon visits an exhibition at the Fitzwilliam MuseumCambridge, which contains a treasure trove of the world’s most important illuminated manuscripts. Germaine Greer joins the modern day illustrator Quentin Blake to consider the religious and political power of these beautiful medieval masterpieces, and to assess their place in the history of art and book production.

Prehistoric America Episode 3 Ice Age Oasis

Prehistoric America takes goes on a journey through the prehistory of North Americabeginning 14,000 years ago when people were first entering the vast and beautiful continent. Witness ancient beasts, mammoths, mastodons, giant bears and sabre toothed cats, and see how their successors, modern animals and beasts, carry on their legacy. Episode 3 Ice Age Oasis – talks about the modern southeastern USA (current state of Florida). The episode focuses on the American Mastodon, the ground sloth Eremotherium, Smilodon and the American glyptodon, Glyptotherium.

Terry Jones' Medieval Lives Episode 3 The Damsel

Buckle on your armor and pick up your lute. Legendary Monty Python star and medieval scholar Terry Jones opens your eyes to the truths behind nine medieval characters you thought you knew. Through a lively mix of humor and researchyou’ll see beyond Renaissance myths and time worn stereotypes. The Damsel – Passive, shy, helpless, in distress and in need of rescue? It may have been centuries before the Women’s Liberation, but medieval damsels had control over their lives. Some ran businesses, others led armies. Not only were many women strong, powerful and sexually confident, it wasn’t unknown for a damsel to abduct a knight. One famous example produced the Scottish hero, Robert the Bruce.

The Great War Episode 21 It Was Like The End Of The World

First broadcast in 1964The Great War was the definitive film account of the world shattering events of World War I (1914 – 1918) a landmark history series widely regarded as a documentary masterpiece. 26 Episodes. The main narrator was Michael Redgrave. It was a co-production involving the resources of the Imperial War Museum, the BBC, CBC and ABC. The series, unparalleled at the time for its depth of research, range of source material and historical accuracy – all presented in a sequence of clear narratives – is now considered one of the finest achievements of BBC documentary. With few exceptions, successive blocks of episodes are devoted to each year of the war episodes 1 – 6 to 1914, 7 – 10 to 1915, 11 – 14 to 1916, 15 – 19 to 1917, 20 – 23 and 26 to 1918.

What the Romans Did For Us Episode 5 Edge of Empire

This is where it all beganAdam Hart-Davis first foray, directly inspired by the Monty Python sequence from The Life of Brian where the People’s Front of Judea discuss “What have the Romans done for us?” into how the foundations of modern society were laid by the surprising cultural and technological achievements of the Roman empires. This is the first series of “What The … Did For Us” hosted by Adam Hart-Davis. Episode 5 Edge of Empire – Hart-Davis visits Hadrian’s Wall and demonstrates how communications were the key to the success of the Roman military machine. Hadrian’s Wall marked the northern boundary of the Roman Empireand had defensive features such as milecastles and forts such as Housesteads. At supply depots such as Arbeia, Romans baked bread in open fires. The remains of a Roman fort and settlement, with full-scale reconstructed buildings and an excellent museum. Excavations are in progress. Many documents have been discovered at Vindolanda fort, such as postcards made out of thin wood veneer.

Cracking The Maya Code

The ancient Maya civilization of Central America left behind an intricate and mysterious hieroglyphic scriptcarved on monuments, painted on pottery, and drawn in handmade bark paper books. For centuries, scholars considered it too complex ever to understand until recently, when an ingenious series of breakthroughs finally cracked the code and unleashed a torrent of new insights into the Mayas’ turbulent past. For the first time, NOVA presents the epic inside story of how the decoding was done traveling to the remote jungles of southern Mexico and Central America to investigate how the code was broken and what Maya writings now reveal.

Seeds Of War WWI

Documentary on the causes of the First World War. Uses archive film from eight countries to try and piece together the attitudes of the leaders of the Great Powers. Also looks at whether it could happen again.

Who Killed Stalin?

Documentary about the final hours of Stalin’s lifewhy was he denied medical attention, was he poisoned? Was it one of his inner circle of cronies and henchmen, also reconstructions of that days events and interviews with Stalin’s living relatives and the children of his inner circle. This is a real who done it.

Absolute Zero Episode 2 The Race for Absolute Zero

Air-conditioningrefrigeration, and superconductivity are just some of the ways technology has put cold to use. But what is cold, how do you achieve it, and how cold can it get? This documentary series explores these and other facets of the frigid. It follows the quest for cold from the unlikely father of air-conditioning, the court magician of King James I of England in the 17th century, to today’s scientists pioneering super fast computing in the quantum chill. The program is based on the definitive book on cold: Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold by Tom Shachtman. Episode 2 The Race For Absolute Zero – picks up the story in the late 19th century, when researchers plunged cold science to new lows as they succeeded in reaching the forbidding realm at which oxygen and then nitrogen liquefy. Scottish chemist James Dewar and Dutch physicist Heike Onnes are featured. The race to the bottom of the temperature scale was as zealous as the contemporaneous race to the Earth’s poles. New techniques developed in the 1990s by Daniel Kleppner set the stage for a race to create an exotic form of matter called a Bose Einstein condensate, which only forms at temperatures vanishingly close to absolute zero.

Bible Mysteries The Real Mary Magdalene

Bible Mysteries is a series of programs exploring great figures and events from biblical times. Historicalarchaeological and anthropological evidence combined with stylish drama re-enactments, CGI graphics and expert opinion offers a comprehensive exploration into some of the Bible’s most compelling people and stories and gives fresh insights into the historical realities of the times. Episode The Real Mary Magdalene – Mary Magdalene’s story is intimately linked with Jesus. She plays a starring role in one of the most powerful and important scenes in the Gospels. When Jesus is crucified by the Romans, Mary Magdalene was there supporting him in his final terrifying moments and mourning his death. She also discovers the empty tomb, and she’s a witness to the resurrection. She was there at the beginning of a movement that was going to transform the West. But the Mary Magdalene that lives in our memories is quite different. In art, she’s often semi naked, or an isolated hermit repenting for her sins in the wilderness an outcast.

Egypt Episode 4 The Temple of the Sands

Egypt is the title of a BBC television drama serial about various archaeological discoveries taking place in that country’s history with the occasional flashback scene involving actors portraying the ancient Egyptians themselves. Episode 4 The Temple of the Sands – Belzoni is sent south again. Belzoniguided by the image of Ramesses, digs in an unlicenced area and discovers a perfectly preserved bust. The discovery of Belzoni’s Tomb secures the Egyptologist’s reputation.

In Search of the Trojan War Episode 4 The Women of Troy

Homer wrote his epicThe Iliad, in 700 BC 500 years after the Trojan Wars were supposed to have taken place. Did the Trojan war ever happen,or was the city destroyed by natural causes? It’s fascinated poets, painters and Hollywood directors for over 2,500 years. Join Michael Wood as he combs the cradle of civilization from Greece to Turkey and points beyond Germany, Ireland and England in search of archaeological evidence that may validate the fantastic battles immortalized in The Iliad From Schliemann’s initial cavalier bulldozing of the mound at Hisarlik, to Homer’s epics, the Hittite Empire, and the role of slave women, Wood journeys back and forth across the Aegean and elsewhere to illuminate the dawn of Western literature, myth, and history. The Women of Troy – Plundering in Bronze Age. The taking of women and children as slaves and their economic and political role. The recent African slavery parallel.

People's Century Episode 1 Age of Hope 1900

A departure from other documentaries that observe history as the actions of great men People’s Century considers the Century from the view of common people. Most persons interviewed were ordinary men and women who closely witnessed various events and they give personal accounts how developments in the Twentieth Century affected their lives. The opening credits depict various images from the century and a very short introduction. Episode 1 Age of Hope 1900 – At the beginning of the twentieth century the world was stable and certain, but unequal. The Paris Exhibition of 1900 symbolises the optimism of a peaceful age when affluence is rising and people have faith in new technologies like electricity. The United States becomes the most powerful country in the world, destination for many immigrants from Europe. Compulsory education in many countries had led to a literate population exposed to new ideas, leisure and consumerism through newspapers. Trade unions grow in strength and force governments to protect employment conditions for workers, while suffragettes push for votes for women. Revolutions shake the political order in China and Russia. European empires continue to dominate the globe, however signs of dissent appear in India and South Africa, and Japan’s victory over Russia in 1905 challenges the belief of white superiority. Nationalism rises in Europe, bringing the continent to conflict in 1914.

Seven Wonders Of The Industrial World Episode 4 The Sewer King

The period of over 125 years from the beginning of the 19th century saw the creation of some of the world’s most remarkable feats of engineering. Seven of the most notable are described hereeach one proving that human creativity is as much alive in the modern world as it was in ancient times. Episode 4 The Sewer King – In the summer of 1858 London was in the grip of a crisis known as the Great Stink. The population had grown rapidly during the first half of the 19th century, yet there had been no provision for sanitation. Three epidemics of cholera had swept through the city, leaving over 30,000 people dead. And sewage was everywhere.

The Divine Michelangelo Episode 1

To produce one of the world’s great masterpieces is impressive. To create three is truly astonishingbut this is exactly what Michelangelo did five hundred years ago. With his own hands he designed and created, the David, the ceiling of the Sistine chapel, and the dome of St Peter’s. Episode 1 – Michelangelo’s path to success was plagued with difficulties. Trace the troubled origins of his genius, from boyhood beatings from his father, to fights with fellow artists. His father’s feeling that his obsession with art would bring disgrace to the family failed to deter the young, determined Michelangelo. The tempestuous young Michelangelo made a name for himself. Aged 26, he took on the seemingly impossible challenge of sculpting a colossal statue of the biblical hero, David, and design a structure to transport the sculpture, which weighed several tons, across the uneven roads without the giant crashing to the ground. It was no mean feat even by today’s standards. To illustrate the technical skills that Michelangelo displayed, the programme enlists engineer Nick McLean to follow in Michelangelo’s footsteps.

The Route Masters Running London's Roads Episode 2 Night Bus

With access to 20,000 transport workers, bus drivers, cabbies, road menders and special police units, this series shows how London really works and introduces viewers to those whose job it is to keep the city moving. Seeing the city through the eyes of those responsible for vital maintenance and traffic regulation is a revelation. That this overcrowded city’s roads work as well as they do is more than impressive, it’s an everyday miracle! Episode 2 Night Bus – The number of passengers travelling around London in the small hours has tripled since 2000 and the night bus service has expanded to cope with the demand, but its drivers face an unpredictable crowd. Tommy McKerr faces trouble on the long N25 route to Essex when a gang of young men piles onto the bus without paying, while a homeless man shows how he has perfected the art of riding London’s longest route to keep warm.

Wildest Africa Madagascar the Island of Monsters

Wildest Africa is a celebration of the continent’s most spectacular locationspeople and wildlife. It showcases the land’s epic natural spectacles and staggering beauty that are truly wild at heart. Go on safari to see the continent’s Big Five lion, elephant, leopard, black rhino, white rhino and Cape buffalo. Wildest Africa discovers their secret locations, their cultural and wildlife issues, as well as how the natural wonders they live in are being threatened. Episode 7 Madagascar Island of Monsters – Madagascar is the world’s fourth largest island and is separated from Africa by hundreds of kilometres of sea and 165 million years of evolution long enough for Madagascar’s plants and animals to evolve into some of the most unusual species on the planet.

Hitler’s Death the Final Report

Chronicles the final days of Adolf Hitler’s life and an account of how he died. Uses information gathered from the Soviet intelligence operation codenamed Operation Myth which describes how his body was found and identified after his suicide. Also re-enactments of interrogations and responses of Germans by Soviet Intelligence taken from transcripts.

The Killer Wave of 1607

A tsunami in the Bristol Channel could have caused the deaths of up to 2,000 people in one of Britain’s greatest natural disasters, experts have said. For centuries, it has been thought that the great flood of January 1607 was caused by high tides and severe storms. Two experts have argued a tsunami could have caused the devastation. Eyewitness accounts of the disaster, published in six different pamphlets of the time, told of huge and mighty hills of water advancing at a speed “faster than a greyhound can run” and only receding 10 days later. Dr Roger Mussonhead of seismic hazards at the British Geological Survey, said there were other examples of earthquakes in the area caused by an ancient fault off south west Ireland. One magnitude 4.5 earthquake was recorded there on 8 February 1980. “The idea of putting a large historical earthquake in this spot is not so fanciful he said. “We know from seismological evidencethat we have actually had an earthquake here, so there is a fault and it is moving, it is active. Other UK tsunamis include a 70 feet high wave that hit Scotland 7,000 years ago, following a massive landslip in Norway.

Ancient Rome The Rise and Fall of an Empire Episode 5 Constantine

This is the 6 episode BBC docudrama with voiceovernot the 13 episode History channel documentary with recreations. The rise and fall of Ancient Rome through six key turning points. Factually accurate and based on extensive historical research, it reveals how the greed, lust and ambition of men like Caesar, Nero and Constantine shaped the Roman Empire. CGI is mixed with compelling drama and spectacular live-action battles. Episode 5 Constantine – In Rome the tyrannical Maxentius consults the gods Jupiter, Apollo and Mars to be told that, the enemy of Rome will be defeated. After seeing what appears to be a sign from the Christian god on the eve of the attack, Constantine adopts a Christian symbol. Constantine defeats his opponent at the Battle of Chrysopolis and the empire is united under one Christian god at the Council of Nicea.

Children of Crime Mary Bell

CSI based documentary serieswhich uncovered the tragic history of Britain’s young murderers, including the horrific cases of Jamie Bulger & Mary Bell. On 25 May 1968, the day before her 11th birthday, Mary Bell strangled four-year-old Martin Brown in a derelict house. On 31 July 1968, the pair took part in the death, again by strangling, of three-year-old Brian Howe, on wasteland in the same Scotswood area. As the girls were so young and their testimonies contradicted each other, the precise details of what happened has never been entirely clear.

Guilty Pleasures Luxury in the Middle Ages

Luxury isn’t always a question of the expensive and beautiful for the rich and powerful it’s always been much more and more important than that. The story of luxury is about an idea that touches on democracy and patriotism on social harmony and epic courage and even on the divine. Because it is so important there has always been more than one definition of what luxury actually is. One thing all can agree on is that luxury is a rare thing, it divides society into the haves and have nots. Host Cambridge University academic Dr Michael Scott asks the question Do we love luxury or hate it or both? He presents the view that the best way to understand today’s anxious response toward luxury is to think about how it operated in the past and to understand how that past continues to impact society today. Episode Luxury in the Middle Ages – follows the clash between luxury and Christianity which convulsed medieval Europe. Luxury was a roadblock on the road to heaven so the church was quick to condemn the jewellery and gorgeous weapons of the early medieval world. Yet the church also had its own form of luxury, in the form of manuscripts designed to do the work of God through astonishment and display. And to some extent it worked, as by 1200 medieval boys’ toys like warhorses and tournaments were suffused with Christian ideas of chivalry and gentility. But trade growth brought new luxuries to Europe, condemned in turn by the church, like exotic spices from the East, spicy food led to spicy conduct and to the sin of lechery, said the preachers. But soon the Black Death paradoxically liberated luxury from the church by initiating a new world of relative luxury and consumerism, the luxury world we inhabit today.