Planet of the Apemen: Battle for Earth Episode 2 Neanderthal

Homo sapienspopulated the Earth only because we were successful in overwhelming two more advanced species: Homo erectus and Homo neanderthalensis, known today as Neanderthals. In the not too distant past, humans shared this planet with other species of hominid. This series tells how, against all the odds, Homo sapiens survived. Episode 2 Neanderthal – This episode is set 35,000 years ago. As the ice caps retreated, the Neanderthal stronghold in Europe weakened, providing a window of opportunity to which modern humans owe their existence. As almost exclusively carnivorous, both male and female Neanderthals hunted. Evidence of a huge number of injuries, like those seen in today’s rodeo riders, suggest that hunting involved dangerously close contact with large prey animals.

Terry Jones' Crusades Episode 4 Destruction

Jones narration is not without an occasional sardonic airalmost of the roll your eyes type, which not only lends a skeptical perspective to a frequently misunderstood era in Western Europe, but also quite frequently editorializes the events that occurred between Pope Urban II’s call for liberation of Jerusalem from the infidels of Islam and the embarrassing moment when officers of the fourth Crusade are conned out of its divine calling by the Venetians. Episode 4 Destruction – Terry Jones reports on how Richard the Lionheart set out to do battle with the legendary Saladin and discovers that inevitably, Richard was an unsatisfactory hero. Terry then re-stages the Fourth Crusade as part of the Venice festival and finds out how the Crusaders destroyed the world’s largest Christian city in a bloody orgy. The final chapter of the story sees the rise of Muslim fanaticism as a mirror to Christian ferocity.

The Great War Episode 16 Right Is More Precious Than Peace

First broadcast in 1964The Great War was the definitive film account of the world shattering events of World War I (1914 – 1918) a landmark history series widely regarded as a documentary masterpiece. 26 Episodes. The main narrator was Michael Redgrave. It was a co-production involving the resources of the Imperial War Museum, the BBC, CBC and ABC. The series, unparalleled at the time for its depth of research, range of source material and historical accuracy – all presented in a sequence of clear narratives – is now considered one of the finest achievements of BBC documentary. With few exceptions, successive blocks of episodes are devoted to each year of the war episodes 1 – 6 to 1914, 7 – 10 to 1915, 11 – 14 to 1916, 15 – 19 to 1917, 20 – 23 and 26 to 1918.

What the Romans Did For Us Episode 2 Invasion

This is where it all beganAdam Hart-Davis first foray, directly inspired by the Monty Python sequence from The Life of Brian where the People’s Front of Judea discuss “What have the Romans done for us?” into how the foundations of modern society were laid by the surprising cultural and technological achievements of the Roman empires. This is the first series of “What The … Did For Us” hosted by Adam Hart-Davis. Episode 2 Invasion – When the Roman army invaded Britain in force in the spring of A.D. 43they brought with them technology that must have astonished the native Celts. To begin with the Roman weapons were far better, they had good swords, spears, and several machines to throw missiles. Built on an archaeological site, this faithful reconstruction of a military complex includes a granary, ramparts and a museum of Roman artifacts. Pre-fabricated forts, such as the reconstruction at Lunt visited by Hart-Davis, secured the victory and exemplified their engineering skills.

Clarissa and the King’s Cookbook

Clarissa Dickson-Wright tracks down Britain’s oldest known cookbookKing Richard II’s 700 year old scroll The Forme of Cury, and compares its contents with the way we eat today, as well as re-creating some of the dishes for a group of food and medieval history experts. Documentary in which self-confessed medieval foodie Clarissa Dickson Wright tracks down Britain’s oldest known cookbook The Forme of Cury, a 700 year old scroll written during the reign of King Richard II from recipes created by the king’s master chefs and wonders if this ancient manuscript may have influenced the way people eat today. On her culinary journey through medieval history she reawakens recipes that have lain dormant for centuries and discovers dishes that are still prepared now.

Rory Bremner and the Fighting Scots

The Scots have a reputation as braveferocious warriors. Despite a troubled history with England, history shows that more of Scotland’s young men sign up to fight for the crown than anywhere else in Britain. Rory Bremner, whose own father and great grandfather were distinguished Scottish soldiers, sets out to discover why rebel clansmen became loyal servants of the military establishment. His story takes him to Culloden, Crimea and northern France. As the sound of the pipes floats over Scottish military camps in Afghanistan he asks if, after 250 years, the Scottish soldier’s loyalty to Queen and country is running out?

Vatican Hidden World

To mark the Papal visit to the UKa camera crew have spent a year filming a world that few have ever seen. With unprecedented access to the Vatican and the people who live and work there, this is a unique profile of the heart of the Catholic Church and the world’s smallest Sovereign State. Archivists reveal the Vatican’s secrets, including the signed testimony of Galileo recorded by the Inquisition. A Cardinal journeys deep below St Peter’s Basilica to inspect the site claimed to be tomb of the Saint himself, and curators share a private viewing of Michelangelo’s extraordinary decoration of the Sistine Chapel.

A History of Scotland Episode 1 The Last of the Free

Ten thought provoking episodes bring a fresh perspective to Scotland’s past and challenges many of the perceived notions of Scottish history. Using the very latest in historical research A History of Scotland is a sweeping and insightful chronicle of an often turbulent but continuingly fascinating nation. Episode 1 – At the dawn of the first millennia, there was no Scotland or England. In the first episode Oliver reveals the mystery of how the Gaelic Scottish Kingdom Alba was born, and why its role in one of the greatest battles ever fought on British soil defined the shape of Britain in the modern era.

Bible Mysteries Joseph and his Multi Coloured Coat

Bible Mysteries is a series of programs exploring great figures and events from biblical times. Historicalarchaeological and anthropological evidence combined with stylish drama re-enactments, CGI graphics and expert opinion offers a comprehensive exploration into some of the Bible’s most compelling people and stories and gives fresh insights into the historical realities of the times. Episode Joseph and his Multi coloured Coat aka Joseph and his Coat of Many Colors – The story of Joseph is one of the best known tales in the Bible. The events of Joseph’s life are also found in the Torah and the Koran. Today it is perhaps most associated with the West End and Sunday school. Written down by scribes about 1000 years after the events supposedly took place, it is often thought that the story may have some historical tradition, but with a healthy portion of dramatic license. Egyptologists, however, have uncovered some intriguing evidence.

Egypt Episode 1 The Search for Tutankhamun

Egypt is the title of a BBC television drama serial about various archaeological discoveries taking place in that country’s history with the occasional flashback scene involving actors portraying the ancient Egyptians themselves. Episode 1 The Search for Tutankhamun – In 1905 Lord Carnarvon arrives in Luxor to convalesce after a road accident and is shown an artifact bearing the cartouche of the mysterious Tutankhamun. An inspired Carnarvon employs Carter. The tomb is finally unearthed. When the tomb is opened in the presence of Carnarvon and his daughter it is revealed to be the only unplundered pharaoh’s tomb in the valley.

In Search of the Trojan War Episode 1 The Age of Heroes

Homer wrote his epicThe Iliad, in 700 BC 500 years after the Trojan Wars were supposed to have taken place. Did the Trojan war ever happen,or was the city destroyed by natural causes? It’s fascinated poets, painters and Hollywood directors for over 2,500 years. Join Michael Wood as he combs the cradle of civilization from Greece to Turkey and points beyond Germany, Ireland and England in search of archaeological evidence that may validate the fantastic battles immortalized in The Iliad From Schliemann’s initial cavalier bulldozing of the mound at Hisarlik, to Homer’s epics, the Hittite Empire, and the role of slave women, Wood journeys back and forth across the Aegean and elsewhere to illuminate the dawn of Western literature, myth, and history. Episode 1 The Age of Heroes – The story of the Trojan War. The lost treasure of Troy. Account of Heinrich Schliemann’s life and research on Troy.

Our Man in the Vatican Episode 2

This series follows local man Francis Campbell in his role as the UK’s ambassador to the Vatican. Delving beneath the ceremonial dutieswe get an unique glimpse into the real life of a diplomat operating within the hidden world of the Vatican. Episode 2 – In this episode, ahead of the G8 summit, cameras follow Francis deep into the Vatican for high level meetings.

Seven Wonders Of The Industrial World Episode 1 The Great Ship

The period of over 125 years from the beginning of the 19th century saw the creation of some of the world’s most remarkable feats of engineering. Seven of the most notable are described here each one proving that human creativity is as much alive in the modern world as it was in ancient times. Episode 1 The Great Ship – In the early 1850s, Brunel hoped the Great Eastern would be his masterpiece, and that it would provide an enduring link to even the most far flung parts of the empire. His concept became the blue print for ship design for years to come. At a time when most ships moored in the Thames were built to traditional designs in wood, and powered by sail, Brunel’s Great Ship was almost 700 feet long, a floating island made of iron.

The Curse of Oil Episode 1 Rich and Poor

Three part series that goes exploring the world’s oil producing regionsbeyond the familiar territory of the Middle East. Unlike other documentaries that are full of gloomy predictions of perishable reserves of oil. Bill Cran’s series takes the view that there are ample supplies of oil, the problem is that most of it lies in the wrong places. Requiring the first world to deal with nasty governments or destroying the wilderness. But the relationship between oil companies, consumers and those who live where the oil is extracted is changing very rapidly. It is becoming possible for native populations to obstruct oil companies. The series concludes there are no easy answers. Episode 1 Rich and Poor – An exploration of how black gold has been the cause of much misery and destruction. Evidence from Angola and Ecuador suggests massive environmental damage has been done while the people who live in oil rich countries are among the last to benefit. The programme also highlights how one of the biggest companies could be facing a 6 billion lawsuit that could radically change the face of the business.

The Last Nazis Episode 2 Most Wanted

The generation of Nazis who fought during World War 2 is almost gone their lives, their actions, and their crimes soon to be consigned to history forever. This sense of urgency, and of time running out, underpins this documentary series about surviving war criminals living in the 21st century. It’s the last chance to tell these stories, to speak to these men, to enter their worlds, and uncover the impact their existence has had on others. Episode 2 Most Wanted – The journey of two young filmmakers who gain access, for the very first time, to some of the most wanted Nazi war criminals still alive in an attempt to discover how their wartime actions have shaped their lives forever.

What the Victorians Did For Us Episode 1 The Speed Merchant

What the Victorians Did for Us examines the impact of the Victorian era on modern society. It concentrates primarily on the scientific and social advances of the erawhich bore the Industrial Revolution and set the standards for polite society today. When Victoria came to the throne in 1837, Britain was on the brink of world supremacy in the production of iron, steel, and steam engines, and had seen an explosion of growth and developments that included railways, the electric telegraph, and wool production. The tremendous feeling of national pride was celebrated in the Great Exhibition of 1851. Drawing on his consummate skill as a storyteller, Adam Hart-Davis shows how Victorian movers and shakers changed our world. Episode 1 Speed Merchants – Focuses on the Victorian obsession with speed, and the impact of steam power on farming. After visiting the last steam-powered mill in the country, Adam experiences the legacy of Brunel’s Great Western Railway, and sees if a project to build a steam-powered plane can ever get off the ground.

Gladstone & Disraeli Clash of the Titans

An engrossing portrait of two of the 19th century’s greatest politicians and Prime MinistersWilliam Gladstone and Benjamin Disraeli, and their struggle to outdo each other over 40 odd years. Presented by Huw Edwards, this extensive film concentrates on how these two ambitious and patriotic men changed the course of British politics, Gladstone by creating the Liberal Party, Disraeli by formulating a more progressive notion of Conservatism that would last well into the 20th century.

The Germans We Kept

In 1946 almost half a million German prisoners of war were still being held in Britain. Interviewsarchive footage and photographs shed light on the experiences of the people of Oswaldtwistle, who were banned from fraternising with the enemy until 1946, a Lancashire town that offered the hand of friendship to the prisoners of war located near the town. The documentary is based largely on the book Enemies Become Friends by Pamela Howe Taylor.

Ancient Rome The Rise and Fall of an Empire Episode 1 Caesar

This is the 6 episode BBC docudrama with voiceovernot the 13 episode History channel documentary with recreations. The rise and fall of Ancient Rome through six key turning points. Factually accurate and based on extensive historical research, it reveals how the greed, lust and ambition of men like Caesar, Nero and Constantine shaped the Roman Empire. CGI is mixed with compelling drama and spectacular live-action battles. Episode 1 Caesar – Risked everything to tear down the government he served and bring revolution to Rome. In Greece, Caesar is forced to retreat inland by Pompey but is victorious when the Senators force Pompey into the Battle of Pharsalus. Caesar overturns the Republic and has himself made dictator for life (essentially the first emperor), only to be assassinated by rivals just four years into his rule.

Chased by Sea Monsters Episode 1 Dangerous Seas

Chased By Sea Monsters a.k.a. Sea Monsters: A Walking with Dinosaurs Trilogy is about Nigel Marven travelling back in time to visit the seven deadliest prehistoric seas. He travels to those time periods on a boat called The Ancient Marinera 24 metre long boat with a crew. His means of time travel is never shown but the closest thing to it is his time map, that show the seven deadliest seas and the creatures that live in them. Epiosde 1 Dangerous Seas – Marks the beginning of Nigel’s quest as he travels back to NewYork in the Ordovician, 450 million years ago,a world of creepy crawlies and an alien atmosphere, to find the giant orthocone. Due to the presence of high levels of carbon dioxide, plants are not able to grow so no animals live on the land. However, in the water, it was completely different story.

Gladiators of WWII The Paras And Commandos

The ultimate success or failure of many of the battles of World War II boiled down to men and machines locked in a fight to the death. Special regimentssquadrons and naval services, together with clandestine forces and formations, gave the vast, overall fighting forces of World War II an extra edge in the most pivotal battles. Gladiators of World War II examines the establishment and background of the greatest fighting forces of the Second World War. Each program examines a different unit, dissecting its command structure, military objectives, battle formations and its success or failure in applying its tactics and strategy to each of the major theatres in which it fought. Episode The Paras and Commandos – Winston Churchill created the Commandos in summer 1940 as a means of striking at the coasts of Nazi Occupied Europe. Beginning as a mere raiding force, they became the spearhead of the Allied amphibious landings in North Africa, Sicily, Italy, and Normandy. Out of the Commandos evolved Britain’s airborne forces, whose feats ranged from the daring Bruneval raid of 1942 to the epic of Arnhem.

Jungle Episode 2 Underworld

Jungles are the world’s powerhousesthe most vital habitats on the planet. They only cover 6% of the Earth, but they contain more than half of its plant and animal species living in a complex web of relationships. Without jungles, the planet would grind to a halt. The jungles of the world are all very different. Charlotte takes a close look at the animals inhabiting the jungles, highlighting how they have adapted to survive the challenging conditions. Episode 2 Underworld – On second episode of Jungle,Charlotte Uhlenbroek explores the mysteries of the forest floor. The forest floor is perhaps the worst and most inhospitable place of all, dark, damp and full of potentially dangerous wildlife, nowhere more forbidding than the original heart of darkness, the Congo. Confronted with walls of impenetrable poisonous plants, toxic snakes, spiders, killer ants, diseases and large predatory cats, you can’t even sit down without being bitten. Charlotte overcomes the hazards, and with state-of-the-art technology and inventive field craft, she reveals the hidden world of the forest floor.

People's Century Episode 11 Brave New World 1945

A departure from other documentaries that observe history as the actions of great men People’s Century considers the Century from the view of common people. Most persons interviewed were ordinary men and women who closely witnessed various events and they give personal accounts how developments in the Twentieth Century affected their lives. The opening credits depict various images from the century and a very short introduction. Episode 11 Brave New World 1945 – Despite being allies against Hitler, disagreement and rivalry soon break out between the Soviet Union and the West, leading to the Cold War. The Soviet Union installs puppet regimes across Eastern Europe with planned economies, prompting Churchill to deliver his Iron Curtain speech. Both sides increasingly distrusts the other, and use propaganda to promote their cause. In 1949 McCarthyism and the Mosinee mock Soviet coup demonstrate US anxiety about communism following Soviet acquisition of the atom bomb and the victory of communism in China. The Berlin Blockade, the Korean War and the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 become flashpoints, although both sides eventually begin to believe in peaceful coexistence and accept a division of spheres of influence. The Soviet Block remains wary of the influence of Western ideas and its superior standard of living, and in 1962 reinforces its divide with the West by building the Berlin Wall. The introductory scene shows the fracternal relationship that had existed between Soviet and Western forces when they finally met in Germany in 1945. Interviewees include Manny Fried and Gail Halverson.

Space Episode 6 Boldly Go

Space is presented by Sam Neill and takes the viewer on journeys across the universe. Unlike Carl Sagan’s 1980 series Cosmosthis series is astronomy for the Age of Anxiety, revealing with terrifying clarity and in graphic detail how fortunate humanity is to exist at all, and how it could all end at any moment as a result of space-bound monsters like rogue comets and asteroids or wandering black holes. Finally, the series finds cause for faint optimism with Star Trek-style speculations on the development of Ion-drive, terraforming new worlds and wormhole technology that might, just might, allow humanity to escape from a doomed Earth and seek refuge somewhere else in the galaxy. The series sheds light on both the secrets of the universe and, implicitly, the anxious state of western new millennial society. Episode 6 Boldly Go – looks at the technologies that are being developed to further enable our venture into space.

The Great War Episode 3 We Must Hack Our Way Through

First broadcast in 1964The Great War was the definitive film account of the world shattering events of World War I (1914 – 1918) a landmark history series widely regarded as a documentary masterpiece. 26 Episodes. The main narrator was Michael Redgrave. It was a co-production involving the resources of the Imperial War Museum, the BBC, CBC and ABC. The series, unparalleled at the time for its depth of research, range of source material and historical accuracy – all presented in a sequence of clear narratives – is now considered one of the finest achievements of BBC documentary. With few exceptions, successive blocks of episodes are devoted to each year of the war episodes 1 – 6 to 1914, 7 – 10 to 1915, 11 – 14 to 1916, 15 – 19 to 1917, 20 – 23 and 26 to 1918.

Tory! Tory! Tory! Episode 2 The Path to Power

Tory! Tory! Tory! is a 2006 BBC television documentary series on the history of the people and ideas that formed Thatcherism told through the eyes of those on the New Right. It was nominated for the best Historical Documentary at the Grierson Awards in 2006. The series was commissioned by the newly appointed Controller of BBC Four Janice Hadlow as a companion piece to the successful series Lefties. Episode 2 The Road to Power – This edition tells the story of a collection of mavericks and outsiders who set out to help Margaret Thatcher kick start a political revolution. The monetarist policies used to defeat inflation caused large-scale unemployment. Riots broke out across Britainthere was growing dissent even inside the government. How would Mrs Thatcher survive her plummeting popularity? Thatcher, not yet secure within her own party since her election to the leadership had surprised many people, appointed moderates to her cabinet. Thatcher’s close ally, Sir Keith Joseph, established the independent Centre for Policy Studies where John Hoskyns and Norman Strauss produced a strategic plan that called for a revolutionary free market government to tackle the problems caused by the trade unions. A revolt in Thatcher’s Cabinet prompted a reshuffle to oust opponents but her leadership seemed in doubt. However, her popularity and revolution were given a boost by the successful Falklands War and the improving economy.

Merthyr War Memorial: Behind the Stone

Documentary telling the story behind the Pontmorlais First World War memorial in Merthyr Tydfil. In recent yearsthe memorial has been suffering from neglect and vandalism. The programme looks at how a new generation of children from Cyfarthfa Junior school in Merthyr are introduced to the idea of why war memorials were erected, and their significance in the community. The children took part in a Heritage Lottery project where they helped produce an animation film about the Pontmorlais memorial alongside professional film makers. The film follows the children’s exploration of war, through a series of workshops and visits which are locally and nationally based, from Cyfarthfa Castle Museum to the Cenotaph and the Imperial War Museum in London. The four minute animation film, which the children helped produce, is shown in the documentary.

The Pharaoh Who Conquered the Sea

Over three thousand years ago legend has it that Queen Hatshepsut, Egypt’s first female pharaoh, sent a fleet of ships to the wonderful, distant land of Punt. A bas-relief in the temple where she is entombed in Luxor shows them bringing back extraordinary treasures. But did this expedition really happen? And if it did, where exactly is the land of Punt?

20th Century Battlefields 1991 Gulf War

Join hosts Peter and Dan Snow for a look at the decisive conflicts of the 20th century. The intricacies of these crucial battlesstrategies, weapons, tactics and their impact. CGI brings to life an overview of the major actions, while the dramatized testimony of ordinary soldiers brings the experience of combat. 1991 Gulf War – It covers in most detail the air campaign (noting the changes in tactics to respond to international pressure) and then the ground attack. No individual engagement is given priority, though an unusual amount of time is given to non-combat events, such as the burning of oil wells and SCUD attacks on Tel-Aviv. Dan Snow experiences operating in gas masks.

Artworks Scotland When Alan Cumming Met Stanley Baxter

In his first BBC TV appearance for almost a decadelegendary Glaswegian entertainer Stanley Baxter chats to Scotland’s Broadway superstar Alan Cumming. There was something quite charming in this old-fashioned chat between showbiz chums, When Alan Cumming Met Stanley Baxter, even though it was an unashamed mutual admiration society. A more ruthless editor might have taken all this out, but it was kind of the point, a gentle encounter between an old ham and a younger one framed as his heir.

Disaster King’s Cross – Beneath the Flames

The Disaster Specials look at how and why major disasters happen and what can be learned from them. They are specifically intended to focus and inform on issues relating to health and safety issues, crisis management and post-disaster supervision. Episode 1 King’s Cross – Over thirty people died in the Kings Cross underground fire, which broke out as commuters headed home on November 18, 1987. At around 19.30 a passenger on an escalator lit a cigarette and dropped the match. The results of this seemingly tiny action were disastrous. The miniscule fire fed on grease on the moving stairway and in 10 minutes had engulfed the wooden treads on the steps. Fifteen minutes later the flames had reached the Kings Cross ticket hall, then erupted in a fireball, filling the crowded station with poisonous black smoke. Many of those who died were killed instantly. Almost 15 years on this programme examines one of the UK’s worst ever disasters.

In Search of Medieval Britain Episode 4 Heartlands

Medieval art historian Dr Alixe Bovey uses the oldest surviving route map of Britain to make a series of journeys through Britain in the Middle Ages. Heartlands – Medieval art historian Dr Alixe Bovey discovers the origins of precedent in common law.

Medieval Season Christina A Medieval Life

Historian Michael Wood delves through medieval court records to follow the fortunes of a village in Hertfordshire andmore particularly, the family of peasant Christina Cok. The 14th century was a perilous time in British history, shot through with famine, plague and war. It was a time of climate change, virulent cattle diseases and, above all, the Black Death. But it was also the time when modern mentalities were shaped, not just by the rulers but increasingly by the common people.

Prehistoric America Episode 1 Land Of The Mammoth

Prehistoric America takes goes on a journey through the prehistory of North Americabeginning 14,000 years ago when people were first entering the vast and beautiful continent. Witness ancient beasts, mammoths, mastodons, giant bears and sabre toothed cats, and see how their successors, modern animals and beasts, carry on their legacy. Episode 1 Land of the Mammoth – talks about Beringea (current state of Alaska and the adjacent country of Canada). The episode focuses mainly on the Woolly mammoth.

Terry Jones' Medieval Lives Episode 1 The Peasant

Buckle on your armor and pick up your lute. Legendary Monty Python star and medieval scholar Terry Jones opens your eyes to the truths behind nine medieval characters you thought you knew. Through a lively mix of humor and researchyou’ll see beyond Renaissance myths and time worn stereotypes. The Peasant – The stereotype of the medieval peasant is a toothless, filthy, ignorant wretch, a slave to his feudal lord and master. Terry Jones discovers a very different reality. They had more holidays than us, very often their houses were bigger, they frequently ate better and arguably had more influence in the corridors of power. The average peasant was, in fact, pretty intelligent.

The Great War Episode 19 The Hell Where Youth And Laughter Go

First broadcast in 1964The Great War was the definitive film account of the world shattering events of World War I (1914 – 1918) a landmark history series widely regarded as a documentary masterpiece. 26 Episodes. The main narrator was Michael Redgrave. It was a co-production involving the resources of the Imperial War Museum, the BBC, CBC and ABC. The series, unparalleled at the time for its depth of research, range of source material and historical accuracy – all presented in a sequence of clear narratives – is now considered one of the finest achievements of BBC documentary. With few exceptions, successive blocks of episodes are devoted to each year of the war episodes 1 – 6 to 1914, 7 – 10 to 1915, 11 – 14 to 1916, 15 – 19 to 1917, 20 – 23 and 26 to 1918.

What the Romans Did For Us Episode 3 Building Britain

This is where it all beganAdam Hart-Davis first foray, directly inspired by the Monty Python sequence from The Life of Brian where the People’s Front of Judea discuss “What have the Romans done for us?” into how the foundations of modern society were laid by the surprising cultural and technological achievements of the Roman empires. This is the first series of “What The … Did For Us” hosted by Adam Hart-Davis. Episode 3 Building Britain – Within 30 years of the invasion there were 60,000 Roman troops in Britain, they had come from some of the most advanced places in Europe, and to them this sort of settlement must have seemed primitive. This is the story of how they transformed the landscape and laid the foundations for the countryside and the cities Britain has today. Hart-Davis analyses the Romans’ ingenious farming methods and looks at the creation of early towns. He visits York and discovers the remains of the Roman city and a Roman sewer that is still working. Butser Ancient Farm, described as “an open air laboratory”this reconstructed Iron Age farm and settlement is an archaeological research project, investigating the ancient methods of Celtic farmers. Housesteads Roman Fort, Britain’s most intact Roman fort, all the more impressive for its clifftop location, built by Hadrian in the second century. Fire brigades and primitive fire extinguishers, demonstrated by Hart-Davis, were developed under the auspices of the Emperor Nero.

Cleopatra Portrait of a Killer

Cleopatra Portrait of a Killer New forensic evidence tells a sinister tale of love and power in Ancient Egypt. Described as a great queena beautiful lover, and a political schemer, Cleopatra is one of the greatest icons in history. However, with almost no remaining evidence of her existence, details of Cleopatra’s life have remained a mystery – until now. In one of the world’s most exciting finds, archaeologists believe they have discovered the skeleton of Cleopatra’s sister who was murdered by Cleopatra and Mark Antony. Journeying from Egypt to Turkey, Cleopatra – Portrait of a Killer uncovers the story of a ruthless queen who would kill her own siblings for power.

Scotland on Screen

Scottish movie star Alan Cumming returns to his homeland to take a tour of the locations of some classic Scottish movies. He celebrates some of the weird and wonderful movies inspired by Scotland such as The Wicker Man, which was filmed in Dumfries and Galloway. Film experts and actors, including Peter Mullen and David Hayman, compare the blockbusters Braveheart and Rob Roy, while Edinburgh’s contribution to Scottish cinema is celebrated by the contrasting films The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie and Trainspotting. Director Bill Forsyth meets Cumming in Cumbernauld – the setting of Forsyth’s film Gregory’s Girl – and explains why the new town was such a fitting location for his enduringly popular film.

Victorian Sex Explorer

Actor and writer Rupert Everett takes a revealing and witty journeyretracing the steps of one of his great heroes the infamous author, Victorian explorer and sexual adventurer, Sir Richard Burton. Labelled Dirty Dickin part for his translations of the Kama Sutra and The Arabian Nights, to others Burton was a pioneer, bringing new cultural ideas of sex and religion from the East to the West.

A History of Scotland Episode 9 This Land is Our Land

Ten thought – provoking episodes bring a fresh perspective to Scotland’s past and challenges many of the perceived notions of Scottish history. Using the very latest in historical research A History of Scotland is a sweeping and insightful chronicle of an often turbulent but continuingly fascinating nation.

Bible Mysteries Revelation: The End of the World?

Bible Mysteries is a series of programs exploring great figures and events from biblical times. Historicalarchaeological and anthropological evidence combined with stylish drama re-enactments, CGI graphics and expert opinion offers a comprehensive exploration into some of the Bible’s most compelling people and stories and gives fresh insights into the historical realities of the times. Episode Revelations aka The Revelation The End of the World? – The Book of Revelation, the last book of the Bible, has fascinated and puzzled Christians for centuries. With its vivid imagery of disaster and suffering the Battle of Armageddon, the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, the hideous Beast whose number is 666 many have seen it as a map to the end of the world. Some say it predicts global warming, AIDS and even the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. But Biblical scholars, having studied the text and the social and political history of the time, have a different interpretation.

Egypt Episode 2 The Curse of Tutankhamun

Egypt is the title of a BBC television drama serial about various archaeological discoveries taking place in that country’s history with the occasional flashback scene involving actors portraying the ancient Egyptians themselves. Episode 2 The Curse of Tutankhamun – In 1922 Carter goes to the Egyptian Antiquities Service in Cairo to announce his discovery but disagrees with Director Pierre Lacau over the clearance and cataloguing of the contents. In 1932 with his work complete Carter leaves the tomb for the last time and hands the key to Lacau.

In Search of the Trojan War Episode 2 The Legend under Siege

Homer wrote his epicThe Iliad, in 700 BC 500 years after the Trojan Wars were supposed to have taken place. Did the Trojan war ever happen,or was the city destroyed by natural causes? It’s fascinated poets, painters and Hollywood directors for over 2,500 years. Join Michael Wood as he combs the cradle of civilization from Greece to Turkey and points beyond Germany, Ireland and England in search of archaeological evidence that may validate the fantastic battles immortalized in The Iliad From Schliemann’s initial cavalier bulldozing of the mound at Hisarlik, to Homer’s epics, the Hittite Empire, and the role of slave women, Wood journeys back and forth across the Aegean and elsewhere to illuminate the dawn of Western literature, myth, and history. Episode 2 The Legend Under Siege – Wilhelm Dorpfeld research. Arthur Evans’ discoveries and theories. Carl Blegen’s findings, the Linear-B deciphering and the role of both in Trojan War credibility.

Our Man in the Vatican Episode 3

This series follows local man Francis Campbell in his role as the UK’s ambassador to the Vatican. Delving beneath the ceremonial dutieswe get an unique glimpse into the real life of a diplomat operating within the hidden world of the Vatican. Episode 3 – Francis is back in Belfast to pick up an honorary degree at Queen’s, and work in the embassy steps up a gear when official confirmation arrives of the Pope’s plan to visit the UK in 2010.

Seven Wonders Of The Industrial World Episode 2 The Brooklyn Bridge

The period of over 125 years from the beginning of the 19th century saw the creation of some of the world’s most remarkable feats of engineering. Seven of the most notable are described hereeach one proving that human creativity is as much alive in the modern world as it was in ancient times. Episode 2 The Brooklyn Bridge – John Roebling from Germany, won the contract to build the largest bridge in the world, the Brooklyn Bridge in New York. It was to stretch 1,600 feet, in one giant leap, across the wide and turbulent East River that separates New York from Brooklyn. At the time such a bold design seemed almost miraculous, and all to be built out of a new material, steel.

The Curse of Oil Episode 2 The Pipeline

Three part series that goes exploring the world’s oil producing regionsbeyond the familiar territory of the Middle East. Unlike other documentaries that are full of gloomy predictions of perishable reserves of oil. Bill Cran’s series takes the view that there are ample supplies of oil, the problem is that most of it lies in the wrong places. Requiring the first world to deal with nasty governments or destroying the wilderness. But the relationship between oil companies, consumers and those who live where the oil is extracted is changing very rapidly. It is becoming possible for native populations to obstruct oil companies. The series concludes there are no easy answers. Episode 2 The Pipeline – Charts an international consortium’s efforts to build a pipeline stretching from the Caspian Sea to Turkey, crossing three countries and five war zones. The 1.6 billion project would revitalise the Western oil supply, but the route through Baku, Azerbaijan, the unstable Panski Gorge region of Georgia, and Turkey would need the protection of troops, an unthinkable prospect for many of the interested parties.

The Last Nazis Episode 3 Children of the Master Race

The generation of Nazis who fought during World War 2 is almost gonetheir lives, their actions, and their crimes soon to be consigned to history forever. This sense of urgency, and of time running out, underpins this documentary series about surviving war criminals living in the 21st century. It’s the last chance to tell these stories, to speak to these men, to enter their worlds, and uncover the impact their existence has had on others. Episode 3 Children of the Master Race – Children of the Master Race looks at the Nazis’ secret breeding programme called Lebensborn, and how the surviving children have lived their lives in the knowledge that they were bred to rule the world.

Who Do You Think You Are? Alan Cumming

Who Do You Think You Are? is a British genealogy documentary series. In each episode a celebrity traces their family tree. Alan Cumming was determined to learn more about his maternal grandfather, Tom Darling. His mother had a number of mementoes from her father’s military career, including a bravery medal, and believed he died in an accident in Malaya (now called Malaysia). In finding the truth, Alan uncovered a story of courage, heartbreak and raw emotion. The actor met a historian in Edinburgh to learn more about Tom’s first years in the Army. He discovered he served as a motorbike despatch rider during World War II, carrying messages between different units in northern France.