Episode 3 What if … Total War

Documentary series telling the history of the Great Warin which nine million people perished. Episode 3 What if… Total War – With deadlock in the trenches, the great powers searched for other ways to break through.

Episode 6 God’s Chosen People

Ten thought – provoking episodes bring a fresh perspective to Scotland’s past and challenges many of the perceived notions of Scottish history. Using the very latest in historical research A History of Scotland is a sweeping and insightful chronicle of an often turbulent but continuingly fascinating nation.

Episode 4 The Spanish Armada

Battlefield Britain is about famous battles in the history of Great Britain. From Boudicca’s destructive rebellion against the Romans to the incredible feats of The Few who saw off the Luftwaffethese battles all had wide reaching consequences and implications for the future of the British isles. Presented by father and son team Peter and Dan Snow. Peter explains the battleplans, Dan the perspective of the common soldier, sailors and airmen. The episodes also featured interviews with soldiers from both sides, re-enactments of the battles and computer generated scenes with bird eye views and blocks to show troop movement. Episode 4 The Spanish Armada – Britain’s defeat of the Spanish Armada in 1588 was a victory against one of the great seagoing nations. The dramatic events helped seal the British reputation as a seafaring people.

Episode 1 Ruling Reptiles

They attack their victims with great strength and speedusing even chemical weapons. To avoid their enemies they can run over the water, throw him blood or poison or just become one with their environment and disappear. They attract their mate giving an extraordinary show of colors and movements and they have superhero abilities as they fly and use X-rays to see. Today’s reptiles are as deadly as dinosaurs, as beautiful as birds and as tender as mammals. Their look is so ancient that it is hard to believe that these animals are true! Episode 1 Ruling Reptiles – The extinction of the dinosaurs left a power vacuum. Enter the dragons: powerful modern reptiles which still dominate large areas of our planet. Ruling Reptiles goes in search of the modern reptiles that have inherited the dominant role.

Episode 3 London and the South East

Medieval art historian Dr Alixe Bovey uses the oldest surviving route map of Britain to make a series of journeys through Britain in the Middle Ages. London and South East – Alixe Bovey follows the ancient pilgrim trail from the east coast to London.

Episode 1

David Dimbleby narrates two part documentary profile of Nelson Mandela. Former South African President and ANC leaderNelson Mandela offers unprecedented access and a unique glimpse into his hectic daily life. Filmed at his home in South Africa and in a series of exclusive interviews with David Dimbleby, Mandela relays stories from his childhood and recounts many of the significant events that took place in his life, including his leadership of the ANC party and struggle against Apartheid, his term in office; and the arduous time he spent in Robben Island Prison. Recollections of his life are also heard from family and friends alongside famous and ordinary people, including the ANC’s political role model and the Cuban revolutionary leader, Fidel Castro. Former United States President and fellow AIDS campaigner, Bill Clinton speaks of the deep admiration that he holds for Mandela.

Episode 7 The Hoover Dam

The period of over 125 years from the beginning of the 19th century saw the creation of some of the world’s most remarkable feats of engineering. Seven of the most notable are described hereeach one proving that human creativity is as much alive in the modern world as it was in ancient times. Episode 7 The Hoover Dam – In the early 1900s engineers began to realise that it would be possible to make the desert bloom, by building a dam across the Colorado River. Some 60 storeys high, and of a larger volume than the Great Pyramid at Giza, the Hoover Dam was soon to break all records. Poverty stricken workers on the dam, earning just a few dollars a day, died from horrific explosions, carbon monoxide poisoning and heat exhaustion as it slowly came to fruition. The chief engineer, Frank Crowe, finished ahead of schedule and under budget.

Episode 2 The Pipeline

Three part series that goes exploring the world’s oil producing regionsbeyond the familiar territory of the Middle East. Unlike other documentaries that are full of gloomy predictions of perishable reserves of oil. Bill Cran’s series takes the view that there are ample supplies of oil, the problem is that most of it lies in the wrong places. Requiring the first world to deal with nasty governments or destroying the wilderness. But the relationship between oil companies, consumers and those who live where the oil is extracted is changing very rapidly. It is becoming possible for native populations to obstruct oil companies. The series concludes there are no easy answers. Episode 2 The Pipeline – Charts an international consortium’s efforts to build a pipeline stretching from the Caspian Sea to Turkey, crossing three countries and five war zones. The 1.6 billion project would revitalise the Western oil supply, but the route through Baku, Azerbaijan, the unstable Panski Gorge region of Georgia, and Turkey would need the protection of troops, an unthinkable prospect for many of the interested parties.

Episode 21 It Was Like The End Of The World

First broadcast in 1964The Great War was the definitive film account of the world shattering events of World War I (1914 – 1918) a landmark history series widely regarded as a documentary masterpiece. 26 Episodes. The main narrator was Michael Redgrave. It was a co-production involving the resources of the Imperial War Museum, the BBC, CBC and ABC. The series, unparalleled at the time for its depth of research, range of source material and historical accuracy – all presented in a sequence of clear narratives – is now considered one of the finest achievements of BBC documentary. With few exceptions, successive blocks of episodes are devoted to each year of the war episodes 1 – 6 to 1914, 7 – 10 to 1915, 11 – 14 to 1916, 15 – 19 to 1917, 20 – 23 and 26 to 1918.

Episode 6 Mammoth Journey

Walking With Beasts is an introduction to the animals (predominantly mammals) that roamed the earth from the extinction of the dinosaurs until the rise of early humansthe Cenozoic period. It uses a combination of clever special effects and computer-generated imagery to create a realistic world as it may have appeared millions of years ago. Some of the concepts it illustrates are the evolution of whales, horses, and humans. Episode 6 Mammoth Journey – In the final episode of the series we go back 30,000 years to the middle of an ice age. The landscape is dominated by the mighty mammoths, living side by side with woolly rhinos, giant deer and two separate species of human. This programme follows the fate of a herd of mammoths in their annual struggle against the harsh ice age conditions. It is a journey fraught with danger as mammoths can get trapped in frozen bogs and the herd have to run the gauntlet of Ice Age hunters like cave lions and the deadly Neanderthals.

Episode 5 Aliens

In this spellbinding series Professor Brian Cox visits the most extreme locations on Earth to explain how the laws of physics carved natural wonders across the solar system. Episode 5 Aliens – The final installment covers life surviving in extreme environmentsand how the search for life on other worlds follows the search for water, focusing on Mars, and on Jupiter’s moon Europa. Cox begins by traveling to the deep ocean to draw comparisons between space travel. The Atacama Desert in South America is also viewed, which is seen to explain the lack of life found there. A trip to the Scablands in North-West America is also made with an explanation of the Missoula Floods that once occurred there, and how it shaped the landscape geologically. More examinations of life come with a trip to Mexico and how life survives in caves, comparing the noxious snottites” of a Mexican cave with possible life on Mars.

Japan in Colour The Wonderful World of Albert Kahn

In 1908the French banker and philanthropist Albert Kahn launched one of the most ambitious projects in the history of photography. A pacifist, internationalist and utopian idealist, Kahn decided to use his private fortune to improve understanding between the nations of the world. To this end, he created what he called his Archive of the Planet. For the next two decades, he dispatched professional photographers to document the everyday lives of people in more than 50 countries all around the world. Kahn’s wealth enabled him to supply his photographers with the most advanced camera technology available.

Thatcher and the Scots

Allan Little looks back at the tumultuous Thatcher years and assesses the effect they had on Scotland. The programme also examines the personalhuman relationship between Margaret Thatcher and Scotland. Why did she become the subject of so much bile? And what does that say about the Scots and their attitudes? With archive film and in-depth interviews with politicians, historians and those who lived through and reported on the Thatcher years.

1982 Falkland Islands

Join hosts Peter and Dan Snow for a look at the decisive conflicts of the 20th century. The intricacies of these crucial battlesstrategies, weapons, tactics and their impact. CGI brings to life an overview of the major actions, while the dramatized testimony of ordinary soldiers brings the experience of combat. 1982 Falklands – Covers the Falklands War from start to finish. Beginning with the invasion of the island, it then details all major engagements of the conflict from The Sinking of the Belgrano, The Sinking of the HMS Sheffield, the British landing on the Falklands, Battle of Goose Green, and finally The Battle for Stanley. Dan Snow practices night fighting with the British Army.

Mystery of the Minoans

Throughout the agescivilizations have risen up and then disappeared. Traditionally, the disappearance of certain ancient civilizations has been left to the theologians and historians to explain. Now scientists have entered the fray. In this series geologists, archaeologists and climatologists explain their findings. Ancient Apocalypse seeks to explain how human achievements were destroyed by the forces of nature. Episode Mysteries of the Minoans – A look at how the Minoan civilization, situated on the Mediterranean island of Crete, was wiped out 3,500 years ago by a volcanic eruption on the nearby island of Thira.

Episode 3 Spare Parts

Documentary series about the brutalbloody and dangerous history of surgery looks at how surgery dragged itself kicking and screaming out of the dark ages, transforming itself from butchery into a science. Presenter Michael Mosley recounts the history of surgery through its catastrophes and successes. Episode 3 Spare Parts – These days, transplant surgery saves thousands of lives every year and almost everything, from heart to eyes, can be replaced. But in the beginning, transplants killed rather than cured, because surgeons didn’t understand that they were taking on one of the most efficient killing systems we know of, the human immune system.

Episode 4 The Temple of the Sands

Egypt is the title of a BBC television drama serial about various archaeological discoveries taking place in that country’s history with the occasional flashback” scene involving actors portraying the ancient Egyptians themselves. Episode 4 The Temple of the Sands – Belzoni is sent south again. Belzoniguided by the image of Ramesses, digs in an unlicenced area and discovers a perfectly preserved bust. The discovery of Belzoni’s Tomb secures the Egyptologist’s reputation.

Episode 1 The Age of Heroes

Homer wrote his epicThe Iliad, in 700 BC 500 years after the Trojan Wars were supposed to have taken place. Did the Trojan war ever happen,or was the city destroyed by natural causes? It’s fascinated poets, painters and Hollywood directors for over 2,500 years. Join Michael Wood as he combs the cradle of civilization from Greece to Turkey and points beyond Germany, Ireland and England in search of archaeological evidence that may validate the fantastic battles immortalized in The Iliad From Schliemann’s initial cavalier bulldozing of the mound at Hisarlik, to Homer’s epics, the Hittite Empire, and the role of slave women, Wood journeys back and forth across the Aegean and elsewhere to illuminate the dawn of Western literature, myth, and history. Episode 1 The Age of Heroes – The story of the Trojan War. The lost treasure of Troy. Account of Heinrich Schliemann’s life and research on Troy.

Episode 2

This series follows local man Francis Campbell in his role as the UK’s ambassador to the Vatican. Delving beneath the ceremonial dutieswe get an unique glimpse into the real life of a diplomat operating within the hidden world of the Vatican. Episode 2 – In this episode, ahead of the G8 summit, cameras follow Francis deep into the Vatican for high level meetings.

The Brainy Barbarians

Monty Python’s Terry Jones invites you on an entertaining expedition through Roman history from an entirely different perspective – that of the Barbarians. Far from the uncivilized savages they have been believed to bemany of these non-Romans were not barbaric at all. They were, in fact, highly organized and intelligent societies that had no intentions of overthrowing Rome or its Empire. The Brainy Barbarians – Jones argues that the ancient Greeks and Persians were in reality far from the Roman view of them as effeminate and addicted to luxury. The Greeks valued science and mathematics, while the Persians had initially allowed multiculturalism among the different ethnic groups of its empire (until years of war with Rome).

Episode 3 The First Romantic

Charles Hazelwood looks at Mozart’s extraordinary life and music. The First Romantic – The third and final film in the series examines howtowards the end of his life, Mozart mastered the language of instrumental and orchestral writing and how both love and loss provoked in him an extraordinary burst of creativity. This was essentially crystallised in three ambitious works that changed the future course of music his last, great trilogy of symphonies – numbers 39, 40 and 41 – which he wrote in six short weeks.

Episode 1 Men From The North

Professor Robert Bartlett embarks on an ambitious journey deep into the hearts and minds of a band of warriors who transformed medieval Europe. He draws on Anglo-Saxon chroniclesmedieval manuscripts and some of the most powerful examples of Norman architecture in an epic sweep of the period of Norman supremacy. And he reveals how the Norman legacy lives on in our culture and politics to this day. Episode 1 Men from the North – Explores how the Normans developed from a band of marauding Vikings into formidable warriors. Normans established their new province of Normandy, land of the northmen, in northern France. They went on to build some of the finest churches in Europe and turned into an unstoppable force of Christian knights and warriors, whose legacy is all around us to this day. William’s greatest achievement was the conquest of England in 1066.

Episode 2 The Applyance of Science

The series explores scientific inventions and discoveries made during the Stuart period from 1603 to 1714 and their implications even today. Episodes are grouped based on themes architecture and lifestyleengineering and sciences, economics and politics, and discoveries with influence in science fiction. Episode 2 The Applyance of Science – Before Stuart times science was dominated by Greek philosopher Aristotle, dead for 2000 years his ideas were becoming discredited and the Stuarts wanted a new approach to understanding nature. This episode charts how the birth of the Royal Society marked a shift from ancient Greek and medieval thought to a more modern scientific approach. This revolutionary time heralded the beginnings of the steam age, hydrodynamics and aerodynamics, as well as the giant revolution accomplished by that greatest of all Stuarts, Sir Isaac Newton.

Blitz The Bombing of Coventry

On 14th November 1940the Luftwaffe launched the most devastating bombing raid so far on Britain. The target was Coventry, deep in the heart of England. In a 12 hour blitz, the Luftwaffe dropped thousands of tons of bombs. Three quarters of the city centre was devastated, including the ancient cathedral. The Nazis coined a phrase – to Coventrate” – to describe the intense destruction. It was a baptism of fire for Coventry and Britain. For yearsthe government feared that aerial bombardment could destroy civilian morale. In Coventry, those fears were tested, and in the immediate aftermath of the blitz the evidence was not encouraging.

Namibia: Genocide and the Second Reich

A hundred years agothree quarters of the Herero people of the German colony of Namibia were killed, many in concentration camps. Today, the descendants of the survivors are seeking reparations from the German government. This film tells for the first time this forgotten story and its links to German racial theories. Described by the BBC as the story of Germany’s forgotten genocide. This powerful documentary by David Adetayo Olusoga took a sensitive and uncompromising look at the tragic circumstances leading to the massacre of three quarters of the Namibia population in German concentration camps built in Africa.