A History of Britain Episode 2 Conquest

From the dawn of civilization to the 20th century A History of Britain re-animates familiar tales and illuminates overlooked aspects of England’s past. Hosted by Simon Schama it spotlights the epic themes and towering figures that transformed an island at the edge of the world into the greatest empire on earthexamining the impact of this extraordinary heritage on the modern nation. Episode 2 Conquest – The Battle of Hastings in 1066, which saw King Harold beaten after leading an army worn out from fighting his brother Tostig and a horde of Vikings, to confront William the Conqueror. The Saxon defeat led to 300 years of Norman rule and a country plagued by massacre and famine, but the rulers managed to keep an inventory of all land and possessions, better known as the Domesday Book.

Battlefield Britain Episode 5 Routing The Royals The Battle of Naseby

Battlefield Britain is about famous battles in the history of Great Britain. From Boudicca’s destructive rebellion against the Romans to the incredible feats of The Few who saw off the Luftwaffethese battles all had wide reaching consequences and implications for the future of the British isles. Presented by father and son team Peter and Dan Snow. Peter explains the battleplans, Dan the perspective of the common soldier, sailors and airmen. The episodes also featured interviews with soldiers from both sides, re-enactments of the battles and computer generated scenes with bird eye views and blocks to show troop movement. Episode 5 Routing The Royals The Battle of Naseby – The Battle of Naseby in 1645 saw Oliver Cromwell’s New Model Army win the decisive battle of the English Civil War, effectively bringing an end to the absolute power of the monarchy.

Guilty Pleasures Luxury in Ancient Greece

Luxury isn’t always a question of the expensive and beautiful for the rich and powerfulit’s always been much more and more important than that. The story of luxury is about an idea that touches on democracy and patriotism on social harmony and epic courage and even on the divine. Because it is so important there has always been more than one definition of what luxury actually is. One thing all can agree on is that luxury is a rare thing, it divides society into the haves and have nots. Host Cambridge University academic Dr Michael Scott asks the question Do we love luxury or hate it or both? He presents the view that the best way to understand today’s anxious response toward luxury is to think about how it operated in the past and to understand how that past continues to impact society today. Episode Luxury in Ancient Greece – follows the debate about luxury which convulsed ancient Greece from the beginning of the classical era. In Athensit explores the role of luxury in the beginnings of democracy – how certain kinds of luxury came to be forbidden and others embraced. A simple luxury like meat could unite the democracy, and yet a taste for fish could divide it. Some luxuries were associated with effeminacy and foreigners, others with the very idea of democracy.

Planet of the Apemen: Battle for Earth Episode 2 Neanderthal

Homo sapienspopulated the Earth only because we were successful in overwhelming two more advanced species: Homo erectus and Homo neanderthalensis, known today as Neanderthals. In the not too distant past, humans shared this planet with other species of hominid. This series tells how, against all the odds, Homo sapiens survived. Episode 2 Neanderthal – This episode is set 35,000 years ago. As the ice caps retreated, the Neanderthal stronghold in Europe weakened, providing a window of opportunity to which modern humans owe their existence. As almost exclusively carnivorous, both male and female Neanderthals hunted. Evidence of a huge number of injuries, like those seen in today’s rodeo riders, suggest that hunting involved dangerously close contact with large prey animals.

The Genius of Beethoven Episode 3 Faith and Fury

A three part drama documentary series about Ludwig van Beethoven presented by conductor Charles Hazlewood. It takes eyewitness accounts of the composer’s tragic life and weaves them into analysis of his groundbreaking music. Faith and Fury – Beethoven again revolutionises musical composition with works such as the Hammerklavier Sonatathe Missa Solemnis, the 9th Symphony and the baffling late string quartets all composed when he was profoundly deaf.

The Great War Episode 28 The Finished Fighter

First broadcast in 1964The Great War was the definitive film account of the world shattering events of World War I (1914 – 1918) a landmark history series widely regarded as a documentary masterpiece. 26 Episodes. The main narrator was Michael Redgrave. It was a co-production involving the resources of the Imperial War Museum, the BBC, CBC and ABC. The series, unparalleled at the time for its depth of research, range of source material and historical accuracy – all presented in a sequence of clear narratives – is now considered one of the finest achievements of BBC documentary. With few exceptions, successive blocks of episodes are devoted to each year of the war episodes 1 – 6 to 1914, 7 – 10 to 1915, 11 – 14 to 1916, 15 – 19 to 1917, 20 – 23 and 26 to 1918.

Windsor Castle A Royal Year Episode 3 The Ranger

For the better part of a millenniumWindsor Castle has been at the heart of British history the awesome fortress, family home, treasure trove and burial ground for the Royal dynasty who went on to take its name. But there is another side to the Castle that tourists never see. It is the real Windsor, a beloved home not only to the Royal family but to more than 400 people who live and work there year round. Windsor Castle A Royal Year provides a fascinating, insider’s look at this grand landmark, where crown and community live and work side by side. Episode 3The Ranger – The Ranger for the 15,000 acre Great Park of Windsor Castle is none other than Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. Like the Castle, the grounds have a pageantry of their own. And nothing is grander than a Royal Wedding, as Prince Charles and Camilla Parker Bowles celebrate their nuptials.

Oz And Them

This documentary takes a light hearted look at the relationship between Australia and Britain. Australia everyone agrees it’s reather stunningbut Australias have always held a rather negative view of the British, people they refer to as Poms. The stereotype of the Pom is uptightpin striped underpants, pretentious, condescending, smug and hypocritical Ouch! In their earthly paradise the Austrlians thrived in opposition to the British but the British were always on their mindsthey are raised on British stories and characters like Biggles. The British have alwasy been drawn to the promise of vast Australia to escape the confines of class. So it’s all a bit complicated and a bit love and hate this relationship between Australia and Britain. Contributors include Clive James, Germaine Greer, Shane Warne, Kathy Lette, Thomas Keneally and former Prime Minister Paul Keating.

The Secrets of Hadrian’s Wall

It is unique in the Roman World. A spectacular and complex stone barrier measuring 74 miles longand up to 15 feet high and 10 feet thick. For 300 years Hadrian’s Wall stood as the Roman Empire’s most imposing frontier and one of the unsung wonders of the ancient world. Almost 2,000 years after it was built, Hadrian’s Wall is proving to be a magical time capsule – a window into the human past. Archaeologists have properly excavated less than 1per cent of it, but they have unearthed extraordinary findings. With presenter Julian Richards Timewatch journeys back through time to unlock the secrets of a lost world.

A History of Britain Episode 14 The Empire of Good Intentions

From the dawn of civilization to the 20th centuryA History of Britain re-animates familiar tales and illuminates overlooked aspects of England’s past. Hosted by Simon Schama, this series discards timelines and tiresome lineages for a lively look at the personalities and cultures that infuse British history. Epic themes and towering figures that transformed an island at the edge of the world into the greatest empire on earth. Episode 14 Empire of Good Intentions – How the noble ideals behind the British Empire failed to match the reality. While British society believed it was delivering the benefits of modern Western civilization in truth the inhabitants of India and Ireland suffered privation due to a laissez – faire economic policy.

Britain's Great War Episode 1 War Comes To Britain

What was it like to live in Britain during the First World War? How did it change the countrydramatically, and permanently? Those are the questions that lie behind Britain’s Great War, the four part series presented by Jeremy Paxman. There were huge changes in Britain too at the end of it, standards of health, nutrition, political representation and sexual equality had risen as the state took a far greater responsibility for its citizens than had ever before been imagined. Britain’s Great War does not play down the grief and suffering of a terrible conflict. Rather it chooses to tell a different, unfamiliar story, the story of how the First World War affected the people of Britain, and dragged the country into the modern age. Episode 1 War Comes To Britain – Traces the story of the dramatic early stages of the war, from stunned disbelief to the mass recruitment of volunteer soldiers. Britain expanded its small army of 80,000 men in France and mobilised 1,500,000 volunteers. Fear of invasion grips the country, Boy scouts guard bridges, and spies are suspected everywhere. For the first time, British civilians are fired on by enemy ships and bombed from the air. Jeremy Paxman, host of the documentary, meets a 105 year old eyewitness to the shelling of Hartlepool, who describes how she thought the Germans had landed. Total war has come to Britain.

In Search of Shakespeare Episode 3 The Duty of Poets

In Search of Shakespeare is a four part series exploring the life of the world’s greatest and most famous writer. It takes the form of a detective storya documentary search, and a journey not the style of historical TV shows that use re-enactments and tableaux. There is no one dressed up as Will Shakespeare or Queen Elizabeth! Instead the Royal Shakespeare Company gives a group of Britain’s best young actors and actresses the chance to go on tje road and play in the places where his company played. Shot documentary style, on and off stage, the successors of Shakespeare’s company give us a magical glimpse into how it was done playing scenes from all Shakespeare’s great shows in Tudor Guildhalls, Royal Palaces like Hampton Court, and even in broad daylight. But the core of the series is a biography. The story of one Elizabethan, his life, family and friendships, his triumphs and disasters, his loves and his losses. Episode 3 The Duty of Poets – In Episode Three of his historical detective story Michael Wood uncovers Shakespeare’s rise to fame and fortune in Elizabethan London, and the disasters in life and love which marked his path to greatness.

Seven Wonders Of The Industrial World Episode 6 The Line

The period of over 125 years from the beginning of the 19th century saw the creation of some of the world’s most remarkable feats of engineering. Seven of the most notable are described hereeach one proving that human creativity is as much alive in the modern world as it was in ancient times. Episode 6 The Line – By the middle of the 19th century, the benefits brought by the host of advances of the industrial age were gradually beginning to reach America, which soon developed a spectacular achievement of its own, the Transcontinental Railway, reaching right across the continent. With two teams, one building from the east and the other from California in the west, they battled against hostile terrain, hostile inhabitants, civil war and the Wild West. Yet in 1869, the two teams’ tracks were joined, shrinking the whole American continent, as the journey from New York to San Francisco was reduced from months to days.

The Great War Episode 7 We Await The Heavenly Manna

First broadcast in 1964The Great War was the definitive film account of the world shattering events of World War I (1914 – 1918) a landmark history series widely regarded as a documentary masterpiece. 26 Episodes. The main narrator was Michael Redgrave. It was a co-production involving the resources of the Imperial War Museum, the BBC, CBC and ABC. The series, unparalleled at the time for its depth of research, range of source material and historical accuracy – all presented in a sequence of clear narratives – is now considered one of the finest achievements of BBC documentary. With few exceptions, successive blocks of episodes are devoted to each year of the war episodes 1 – 6 to 1914, 7 – 10 to 1915, 11 – 14 to 1916, 15 – 19 to 1917, 20 – 23 and 26 to 1918.

What the Romans Did For Us Episode 1 Life of Luxury

This is where it all beganAdam Hart-Davis first foray, directly inspired by the Monty Python sequence from The Life of Brian where the People’s Front of Judea discuss “What have the Romans done for us?” into how the foundations of modern society were laid by the surprising cultural and technological achievements of the Roman empires. This is the first series of “What The … Did For Us” hosted by Adam Hart-Davis. Episode 1 The Life of Luxury – After hundreds of years of occupation many generations of people in Britain had grown up surrounded by Roman cultureand after a long period of stability that culture was showing visible signs of wealth, success and good living. This 2,000 year old Great Roman Temple enclosing a natural spring is one of Bath’s foremost visitor attractions. The site of a celtish shrine to the Roman goddess, Sulis Minerva, it boasts a beautifully preserved bath, temple and pump room. A well-preserved cavalry fort, complete with a bath house and which features an impressive museum. Original artifacts are on display. Cooking implements, demonstrated by food historian and chef Sally Grainger, were used to create 3 course Roman meals.

Clarissa and the King’s Cookbook

Clarissa Dickson-Wright tracks down Britain’s oldest known cookbookKing Richard II’s 700 year old scroll The Forme of Cury, and compares its contents with the way we eat today, as well as re-creating some of the dishes for a group of food and medieval history experts. Documentary in which self-confessed medieval foodie Clarissa Dickson Wright tracks down Britain’s oldest known cookbook The Forme of Cury, a 700 year old scroll written during the reign of King Richard II from recipes created by the king’s master chefs and wonders if this ancient manuscript may have influenced the way people eat today. On her culinary journey through medieval history she reawakens recipes that have lain dormant for centuries and discovers dishes that are still prepared now.

After Rome Holy War and Conquest Episode 1

In this two-part series Boris Johnson investigates the early beginnings of what some call the clash of civilizations. The theory that Christianity and Islam are locked into a never-ending cycle of mutual antipathy distrust and violence. Is this really true? There have been many clashes” between Christianity and Islam in the period Boris Johnson examines in this series632 A.D. to 1492 A.D. But the real historical picture is far more subtle, interesting and optimistic than the cliches of a clash of civilization might suggest. Episode 1 – Boris Johnson travels to France, Spain, Egypt, Israel, Syria and Turkey. This first programme looks at the early history of Islam, the extraordinary series of conquests that gained for it half the territories of the old Roman empire in just 80 years. He also looks at the rich and sophisticated civilization Islam produced, the relationships between Muslims, Jews and Christians and the background to the crusades.

Conquistadors Episode 2 The Conquest of The Incas

The Spanish conquest of the Americas in the sixteenth century was one of the most cataclysmic events in history. Spanish expeditions had to endure the most unbelievable hardships to open up the lands of the New World. Few storiesif any, in history match these for sheer drama, endurance and distance covered. Michael Woods travels in the footsteps of the Spanish adventures. The Conquest of the Incas – Fancisco Pizarro hoped to find great riches in the land of the Inca when he set off on his third voyage to the new world in 1527. Learn how Pizarro ransomed the life of a king for a room full of gold and silver. Through letter and drawings from the 16th century and film from modern day south America, discover this remarkable story of greed, faith, dishonor and valor.

Medieval Season How To Build A Cathedral

The great cathedrals were the wonders of the medieval world. Many were the tallest structures on earththe highest buildings created since the pyramids and until the Eiffel Tower, yet they were built without any of the technological aids of the modern world and with little more than set-squares and dividers, ropes and pulleys, hammers and chisels. The vision was to create a sense of heaven on earth and the medieval cathedral aspired to be nothing less than the new Jerusalem. Spectacular effects were achieved as this ambition was realisedleading to a revolution in design and a golden age for cathedral architecture in England. Who were the people who built them? What drove them? And just how were they able to build with such stupendous skill, vision and ambition? Architectural historian Jon Cannon, author of the recent, acclaimed Cathedral, goes in search of the clues that shed light on how our medieval forebears were able to realise such bold ambition. From the fan vaulting at Gloucester to the stained glass at York, from the solid mass of Norwich to the soaring elegance of the Octagon at Ely, Jon climbs up above the stone vaulted ceilings, along the parapets, through the roof voids and down into the crypts of the greatest cathedrals to find out how, and why, it was done.

Thatcher: The Downing Street Years Episode 4 Wielding the Knife

This series examines the eleven years which Thatcher spent as Prime Minister of the UK. Using interviews with former Cabinet Ministers and Thatcher herselfthis series covers important events in Margaret Thatcher’s Premiership, from 1979 to 1990. Episode 4 Wielding the Knife – As the Conservative Party began to turn against her leadership, the Prime Minister showed no willingness to stand down. Although there was no clear successor, colleagues were beginning to view Thatcher as an electoral liability. She speaks of what she regarded as their disloyalty. What hurts most of all is that this was treacheryshe says of her enforced resignation, treachery with a smile on its face. Naturally this charge is denied by her former colleagues.

The Great War Episode 18 Fat Rodzianko Has Sent Me Some Nonsense

First broadcast in 1964The Great War was the definitive film account of the world shattering events of World War I (1914 – 1918) a landmark history series widely regarded as a documentary masterpiece. 26 Episodes. The main narrator was Michael Redgrave. It was a co-production involving the resources of the Imperial War Museum, the BBC, CBC and ABC. The series, unparalleled at the time for its depth of research, range of source material and historical accuracy – all presented in a sequence of clear narratives – is now considered one of the finest achievements of BBC documentary. With few exceptions, successive blocks of episodes are devoted to each year of the war episodes 1 – 6 to 1914, 7 – 10 to 1915, 11 – 14 to 1916, 15 – 19 to 1917, 20 – 23 and 26 to 1918.

What the Tudors Did For Us Episode 4 The Goode Lyfe

What an unruly lot! Beheadingsmurder, divorce, rows with the Pope, civil war, fire and plague. The headline stories from the Tudor and Stuart years represent a roller-coaster ride through one of the most important periods of history in the development of modern Britain. Most know the bloody, battle filled history of the Tudor period, not many know the accomplishments of the period. Adam Hart-Davis travels through England in search of Tudor excellence in science, art, printing, exploration and more. Ranging from a shepherd’s discovery of graphite which led to the first pencil, to a fuller understanding of human anatomy once Henry VII legalized human dissection. Episode 4 War Machyne – Adam looks at the development of Tudor weapons of war, taking in unpleasant implements of torture, cryptography, and casts his own cannon out of pure iron and test fires it!

Inside the Mind of Adolf Hitler

A Documentarywith dramatised elements, looking at the psychological profile of Adolf Hitler compiled by a team of Harvard psychologists in 1943. Interviewing former colleagues and the former family doctor who had fled to the USA and using Freudian techniques and theories of the day they came up with a profile and predicted how he would react to certain situations, concluding that he would not surrender and would be most likely to commit suicide when faced with defeat. This led to future profiling of many world leaders and dictators.

The Last Dukes

Dukedoms are created by the monarch for reasons ranging from a grateful nation rewarding a major war leader to a king acknowledging his illegitimate son. The last dukedom to be created was by Queen Victoria. As they gradually become extinct what will become of those that remain? Do they still have power and wealth? What is it to be a duke in the 21st century? Answers come from a surprising variety of extraordinary character.

A History of Britain Episode 3 Dynasty

From the dawn of civilization to the 20th centuryA History of Britain re-animates familiar tales and illuminates overlooked aspects of England’s past. Hosted by Simon Schama, this series discards timelines and tiresome lineages for a lively look at the personalities and cultures that infuse British history. Epic themes and towering figures that transformed an island at the edge of the world into the greatest empire on earth. Episode 3 Dynasty – The story of Henry IIwho built one of the greatest empires in the medieval world, only to see it torn down by members of his own family. Infamous for inciting the murder of Archbishop of Canterbury Thomas Becket, Henry has rarely been recognised for his achievements, which included the laying of the foundations for today’s legal system.

Battlefield Britain Episode 6 A Clash Of Kings The Battle Of The Boyne

Battlefield Britain is about famous battles in the history of Great Britain. From Boudicca’s destructive rebellion against the Romans to the incredible feats of The Few who saw off the Luftwaffethese battles all had wide reaching consequences and implications for the future of the British isles. Presented by father and son team Peter and Dan Snow. Peter explains the battleplans, Dan the perspective of the common soldier, sailors and airmen. The episodes also featured interviews with soldiers from both sides, re-enactments of the battles and computer generated scenes with bird eye views and blocks to show troop movement. Episode 6 Battle of the Boyne – The story of the Battle of the Boyne in 1690 – the effects of which are still having consequences in everyday life in Ireland today.

Guilty Pleasures Luxury in the Middle Ages

Luxury isn’t always a question of the expensive and beautiful for the rich and powerfulit’s always been much more and more important than that. The story of luxury is about an idea that touches on democracy and patriotism on social harmony and epic courage and even on the divine. Because it is so important there has always been more than one definition of what luxury actually is. One thing all can agree on is that luxury is a rare thing, it divides society into the haves and have nots. Host Cambridge University academic Dr Michael Scott asks the question Do we love luxury or hate it or both? He presents the view that the best way to understand today’s anxious response toward luxury is to think about how it operated in the past and to understand how that past continues to impact society today. Episode Luxury in the Middle Ages – follows the clash between luxury and Christianity which convulsed medieval Europe. Luxury was a roadblock on the road to heavenso the church was quick to condemn the jewellery and gorgeous weapons of the early medieval world. Yet the church also had its own form of luxury, in the form of manuscripts designed to do the work of God through astonishment and display. And to some extent it worked, as by 1200 medieval boys’ toys like warhorses and tournaments were suffused with Christian ideas of chivalry and gentility. But trade growth brought new luxuries to Europe, condemned in turn by the church, like exotic spices from the East, spicy food led to spicy conduct and to the sin of lechery, said the preachers. But soon the Black Death paradoxically liberated luxury from the church by initiating a new world of relative luxury and consumerism, the luxury world we inhabit today.

Reputations The Last Shah

Profile of the last Shah of Iran Mohammed Reza Pahlaviusing interviews from family, friends, supporters and enemies. He was overthrown by Muslim fundamentalists in 1979 and forced into exile. Supporters speak out on behalf of the man who saw himself as a visionary king, while detractors dismiss him as a Third World dictator ousted by a popular revolution. In his own eyes he was a visionary king leading a grateful nation toward something he called the great civilization. History proved him wrong but for nearly 40 years many people gambled on him being right. This documentary is the story of that gamble and why he became the last Shah, ending 2,500 years of monarchy in Iran.

The Genius Of Design Episode 3 Blueprints For War

Documentary series exploring the fascinating story of the birth of industrial design. Alongside the celebrated namesfrom Wedgwood to William Morris, it also explores the work of the anonymous designers responsible for prosaic but classic designs for cast iron cooking pots to sheep shears harbingers of a breed of industrially produced objects culminating in the Model T Ford. Episode 3 – Blueprints for War The Genius of Design examines the Second World War through the prism of the rival war machines designed and built in Germany, Britain, the USSR and the USA, with each casting a fascinating sidelight on the ideological priorities of the nations and regimes which produced them. From the desperate improvisation of the Sten gun, turned out in huge numbers by British toy makers, to the deadly elegance of the all wood Mosquito fighter bomber, described as the finest piece of furniture ever made the stories behind these products reveal how definitions of good design shift dramatically when national survival is at stake. Featuring desert war veteran Peter Gudgin and designer Michael Graves.

The Route Masters Running London's Roads Episode 2 Night Bus

With access to 20,000 transport workers, bus drivers, cabbies, road menders and special police units, this series shows how London really works and introduces viewers to those whose job it is to keep the city moving. Seeing the city through the eyes of those responsible for vital maintenance and traffic regulation is a revelation. That this overcrowded city’s roads work as well as they do is more than impressive, it’s an everyday miracle! Episode 2 Night Bus – The number of passengers travelling around London in the small hours has tripled since 2000 and the night bus service has expanded to cope with the demand, but its drivers face an unpredictable crowd. Tommy McKerr faces trouble on the long N25 route to Essex when a gang of young men piles onto the bus without paying, while a homeless man shows how he has perfected the art of riding London’s longest route to keep warm.

Wonders of the Solar System Episode 2 Order Out Of Chaos

In this spellbinding series Professor Brian Cox visits the most extreme locations on Earth to explain how the laws of physics carved natural wonders across the solar system. Episode 2 Order Out of Chaos – Cox starts this episode in Al-QayrawanTunisia to analyse the orbit of the planets around our Sun, with details on how the tilt of the Earth creates the seasons. He also visits the Atlas Mountains and provides an explanation of the how we see the orbit of Mars. This episode also provides an insight on the rings of Saturn and the geysers of Enceladus, including images shown as seen from the Cassini Huygens space probe.

Partition: The Day India Burned

Documentary about the effects of Britain’s withdrawal from India in 1947 which triggered one of the biggest migrations in history. 15 million were displaced and more than a million lost their lives. The story is told through the testimony of people who lived together for centuriesbut were forced out of their homes as one of the largest and most ethnically diverse nations in the world was divided. Dramatised reconstructions evoke some of the mistrust, violence and upheaval that ensued.

The Spies Who Fooled Hitler: MI5 at War

Exposing the undercover dealings of enemy agents and the MI5 counter deceptionknown as the double cross system, in the Second World War. Captured German spies were turned into double agents and used to deceive the Axis forces. These agents played a crucial role in the success of the Normandy landings Includes interviews with Pat McCallum, who was in charge of the double agents’ files at MI5, Anthony Simkins, former Deputy Director of MI5, as well as members of the German Abwehr military intelligence service.

A History of Britain Episode 15 The Two Winstons

From the dawn of civilization to the 20th centuryA History of Britain re-animates familiar tales and illuminates overlooked aspects of England’s past. Hosted by Simon Schama, this series discards timelines and tiresome lineages for a lively look at the personalities and cultures that infuse British history. Epic themes and towering figures that transformed an island at the edge of the world into the greatest empire on earth. Episode 15 The Two Winstons – The lives of Winston Churchill and George Orwellwho created the hero Winston Smith in his novel 1984. These men had a huge personal impact on the historian and touched many of the key events of the 20th century, including the World Wars and the Depression.

Cathedral Fire At York

The history of Britain and the aspirations of her Christian communities can be traced in the glorious excesses of the cathedrals. From Norman grandeur to the modern interpretations found in Liverpool and Coventryexplore the changing styles of the cathedrals in our midst. A 5 part series that takes a looks at the ingenuity behind the construction of Britain’s most famous cathedrals, using CGI and reconstructions to describe the dramatic stories of riot, fire, war, murder, and flood that shaped the history of these impressive masterpieces. Fire at York – In 1829, non-conformist Jonathan Martin set fire to York Minster to protest against what he saw as the greed and complacency of the clergy. At the same time, antiquarian John Browne embarked on his journey to discover how the cathedral had been designed and built. This is the story of Martin and the trial that would lead to either execution or the asylum, and of Browne and his determination to crack the mason’s code that he believed lay embedded in the structure of the Minster.

Landscape Mysteries Episode 2 Figures in the Chalk

Professor Aubrey Manning embarks on a series of journeys in which he tries to solve mysteries hidden in the landscape of the British Isles. Unpicking clues in the geologynatural history, and archaeology, Aubrey reveals how the land has come to look the way it does. Episode 2 Figures In The Chalk – Aubrey travels to the Chalk Hills of England to unravel the origins of the enigmatic chalk figures such as the Long Man of Wilmington and the Cerne Abbas Giant in Dorset. The age of these chalk figures has never been fully established and Aubrey, alongside a team of archaeologists from Reading University, come up with a remarkable new discovery.

Seven Wonders Of The Industrial World Episode 7 The Hoover Dam

The period of over 125 years from the beginning of the 19th century saw the creation of some of the world’s most remarkable feats of engineering. Seven of the most notable are described hereeach one proving that human creativity is as much alive in the modern world as it was in ancient times. Episode 7 The Hoover Dam – In the early 1900s engineers began to realise that it would be possible to make the desert bloom, by building a dam across the Colorado River. Some 60 storeys high, and of a larger volume than the Great Pyramid at Giza, the Hoover Dam was soon to break all records. Poverty stricken workers on the dam, earning just a few dollars a day, died from horrific explosions, carbon monoxide poisoning and heat exhaustion as it slowly came to fruition. The chief engineer, Frank Crowe, finished ahead of schedule and under budget.

The Great War Episode 8 Why Don’t You Come And Help!

First broadcast in 1964The Great War was the definitive film account of the world shattering events of World War I (1914 – 1918) a landmark history series widely regarded as a documentary masterpiece. 26 Episodes. The main narrator was Michael Redgrave. It was a co-production involving the resources of the Imperial War Museum, the BBC, CBC and ABC. The series, unparalleled at the time for its depth of research, range of source material and historical accuracy – all presented in a sequence of clear narratives – is now considered one of the finest achievements of BBC documentary. With few exceptions, successive blocks of episodes are devoted to each year of the war episodes 1 – 6 to 1914, 7 – 10 to 1915, 11 – 14 to 1916, 15 – 19 to 1917, 20 – 23 and 26 to 1918.

What the Romans Did For Us Episode 2 Invasion

This is where it all beganAdam Hart-Davis first foray, directly inspired by the Monty Python sequence from The Life of Brian where the People’s Front of Judea discuss “What have the Romans done for us?” into how the foundations of modern society were laid by the surprising cultural and technological achievements of the Roman empires. This is the first series of “What The … Did For Us” hosted by Adam Hart-Davis. Episode 2 Invasion – When the Roman army invaded Britain in force in the spring of A.D. 43they brought with them technology that must have astonished the native Celts. To begin with the Roman weapons were far better, they had good swords, spears, and several machines to throw missiles. Built on an archaeological site, this faithful reconstruction of a military complex includes a granary, ramparts and a museum of Roman artifacts. Pre-fabricated forts, such as the reconstruction at Lunt visited by Hart-Davis, secured the victory and exemplified their engineering skills.

Coolies: How Britain Re-Invented Slavery

The slave trade was abolished over years ago but one form of slavery continued well into the 20th century. The so-called coolies comprised over one million Indians who migrated to all corners of the British Empire to carry out indentured labour. It is a chapter in colonial history that implicates figures at the very highest level of the British establishment and has defined the demographic shape of the modern world. In this filmwhich combines historical evidence and archive material, descendants of the coolies look into their past and trace the last surviving witnesses.

Telling Tales Young Offender

Jason Williams has a history of persistance offending and is about to finish his sentence of 3 years. Thsi documentary follows him as he prepares to leave jail.

After Rome Holy War and Conquest Episode 2

In this two-part series Boris Johnson investigates the early beginnings of what some call the clash of civilizations. The theory that Christianity and Islam are locked into a never-ending cycle of mutual antipathy distrust and violence. Is this really true? There have been many clashes” between Christianity and Islam in the period Boris Johnson examines in this series632 A.D. to 1492 A.D. But the real historical picture is far more subtle, interesting and optimistic than the cliches of a clash of civilization might suggest. Episode 2 – Boris Johnson begins by looking at the crusades, and the way they are viewed in the west and in the Muslim world today. But Boris finds that the realities of the crusades are far more subtle than modern attitudes to them would have us believe. Boris looks at the Sack of Constantinople, when Latin Christians fought eastern Christians, leading eventually to the fall of the city to the Ottoman Turks in 1453. He looks too at the Reconquista in Spain, which culminated in the wholesale expulsion of Jews and Muslims. At every turn of his journey, Boris Johnson finds that the real history is a good deal more subtle and interesting than the fictions that have grown up around it.

Conquistadors Episode 3 The Search for Eldorado

The Spanish conquest of the Americas in the sixteenth century was one of the most cataclysmic events in history. Spanish expeditions had to endure the most unbelievable hardships to open up the lands of the New World. Few storiesif any, in history match these for sheer drama, endurance and distance covered. Michael Woods travels in the footsteps of the Spanish adventures. The Search for El Dorado – Francisco de Orellana failed to find El Dorado, but discovered the amazon. Early in 1541, a rumor swept Quito that beyond the mountains, there lay a land richer than Mexico, or even Peru a land of gold. The ruler of this land was so rich that he covered himself with gold dust every day and washed it off every evening. He was the golden man, El Dorado.

Monsters We Met Episode 1 The Eternal Frontier

Also Called Land of Lost Monsters when it aired on Animal Planet. The first humans left their African homeland 100,000 years ago and began an epic journey that was to end with mankind dominating the globe. On their voyages they encountered monster like creatures and perilous lands that would test their powers of survival to the very limit. In this series we journey with them into an unknown world where no man had set foot before. Each film is a dramatic reconstruction of personal stories of our ancestors’ struggle for survival in a primaeval wilderness dominated by formidable predators. A world where man was both hunter and hunted. Episode 1 The Eternal Frontier – North America 13,000 years ago While the world was still in the grip of the last ice age, humans first crossed Siberia and entered the New World. They encountered creatures familiar to them from their travels, such as the woolly mammoth and the steppe bison. The Americas was the only continent where humans ever came face to face with sabre toothed cats, giant ground sloths or the massive short faced bears.

The Blue Planet Episode 4 Seasonal Seas

The definitive story of the blue section of our planetthe oceans, which run from the shores to the open depths of the sea. An epic, eight part series that took five years to complete, The Blue Planet firmly re-establishes the BBC as the world’s pre-eminent producer of top quality nature documentaries. Exploring every aspect of marine ecosystems, from coastal marshes to deep-sea trenches and from polar waters to tropical reefs, The Blue Planet is thorough and informative, yet never less than thrilling. Episode 4 Seasonal Seas – Just when the weather is at its worst,100,000 grey seals haul themselves up through the surf on to Sable Island off Nova Scotia. This is the world’s largest colony of grey seals and perversely they’ve come to breed in winter. Within 18 days the pups are abandoned, but spring is on its way with plenty of food. On the seafloor, seaweed stretches towards the sunlight, and off the coast of California, underwater forests of giant kelp grow up to 100 metres high.

The Great War Episode 19 The Hell Where Youth And Laughter Go

First broadcast in 1964The Great War was the definitive film account of the world shattering events of World War I (1914 – 1918) a landmark history series widely regarded as a documentary masterpiece. 26 Episodes. The main narrator was Michael Redgrave. It was a co-production involving the resources of the Imperial War Museum, the BBC, CBC and ABC. The series, unparalleled at the time for its depth of research, range of source material and historical accuracy – all presented in a sequence of clear narratives – is now considered one of the finest achievements of BBC documentary. With few exceptions, successive blocks of episodes are devoted to each year of the war episodes 1 – 6 to 1914, 7 – 10 to 1915, 11 – 14 to 1916, 15 – 19 to 1917, 20 – 23 and 26 to 1918.

What the Victorians Did For Us Episode 1 The Speed Merchant

What the Victorians Did for Us examines the impact of the Victorian era on modern society. It concentrates primarily on the scientific and social advances of the erawhich bore the Industrial Revolution and set the standards for polite society today. When Victoria came to the throne in 1837, Britain was on the brink of world supremacy in the production of iron, steel, and steam engines, and had seen an explosion of growth and developments that included railways, the electric telegraph, and wool production. The tremendous feeling of national pride was celebrated in the Great Exhibition of 1851. Drawing on his consummate skill as a storyteller, Adam Hart-Davis shows how Victorian movers and shakers changed our world. Episode 1 Speed Merchants – Focuses on the Victorian obsession with speed, and the impact of steam power on farming. After visiting the last steam-powered mill in the country, Adam experiences the legacy of Brunel’s Great Western Railway, and sees if a project to build a steam-powered plane can ever get off the ground.

Laughing With Hitler

Documentary which examines the history of the Third Reich through the jokes told by and about the Nazis and the fate that befell some of the joke tellers. At first this was tolerated and even encouraged – but as the war drew on jokes became a channel for subversive information and dissent and by the end laughter out of turn was cracked down upon severely. Satire and jokes at Hitler’s expense were encouraged to some degree as he came into power but gradually anything deemed subversive was squeezed out and telling such jokes gradually became more and more dangerous. As the war started to turn back against German cities and civilianswhere understandably there was a certain amount of gallows humour. Cabaret artiste, Werner Finck, was imprisoned in a concentration camp, but then released, while actor Fritz Muliar’s anti-Hitler jokes landed him in a penal battalion in Russia. Throughout the film the jokes are recreated by two German comedians. A bizarre but compelling examination of humour in the Third Reich. Director/Narrator: Rudolph Herzog (Son of Werner Herzog, documentary film maker). Also known as: Satirizontas to Hitler.

The Lost Libraries of Timbuktu

Aminatta Forna tells the story of legendary Timbuktu and its long hidden legacy of hundreds of thousands of ancient manuscripts. With its university founded around the same time as OxfordTimbuktu is proof that the reading and writing of books have long been as important to Africans as to Europeans. Viewers meet local scholars, as well as experts from across Africa and the Western world, who elucidate just how valuable these fragile treasures are to our knowledge of Africa, Islam, and the growth of literacy outside the Western tradition.