Great Artists with Tim Marlow Episode 10 Velazquez

A major 14 part television series in which art historian Tim Marlow takes a fresh look at the most important artworks of some of the greatest artists in history. Shot on location in over 50 galleriesmuseums, churches and palaces throughout Europe and the United States, this series is a comprehensive survey of the history of Western art. Both intelligent and informative, the series aims to provide an uncomplicated and accessible analysis of the works and artists featured including Giotto, Michelangelo and Raphael.

Wayward Women Episode 4 Artists & Adventurers

Wayward women tells the tale of some of history’s most fascinating females and combines strong story telling from celebrities and academics with the unique atmosphere and ambience of a burlesque venue. This series focuses on women from Yorkshire and the North East of England. It is a great short introduction to women you may not have heard of before. It is not an in depth programbut it is intended to spark your interest so that you will explore more on your own. Historians and psychologists add fact to the rumours. Each story is accompanied by artistic re-enactments, archive stills and burlesque artists.Commentors include Germaine Greer, Carol McGiffin, Scott Henshall, Michelle Heaton, Jayne Middlemiss and Simon Donald. Episode 4 Artists & Adventurers features Gertrude Bell (Redcar’s Arabian Adventuress), George Elliott (Flouter of Convention), Margaret Hunt (Lover of Literature), Dorothy Forster (Bamburgh’s Bravest Heart), and Amy Johnson (Hull’s Heavenly Heroine).

Great Museums Horse Power The National Museum of Racing

Learn the history of thoroughbred horse racing at the National Racing Museum and Hall of Fame. Thoroughbred racing is one of America’s oldest sportsand it has a colorful history. Seabiscuit, Man o’ War, Secretariat, Arcaro, and the Jones Boys are all heroes of the turf and names that evoke the clang of the starting gate, the thunder of pounding hooves the sights and sounds of racing. Located at the historic Saratoga Springs racetrack, this museum celebrates the sport and the animals whose grace and beauty have become legendary. General Topics are History, Industry, Popular Culture, Diversity.

Vatican Hidden World

To mark the Papal visit to the UKa camera crew have spent a year filming a world that few have ever seen. With unprecedented access to the Vatican and the people who live and work there, this is a unique profile of the heart of the Catholic Church and the world’s smallest Sovereign State. Archivists reveal the Vatican’s secrets, including the signed testimony of Galileo recorded by the Inquisition. A Cardinal journeys deep below St Peter’s Basilica to inspect the site claimed to be tomb of the Saint himself, and curators share a private viewing of Michelangelo’s extraordinary decoration of the Sistine Chapel.

Art of Spain Episode 2 The Dark Heart

This series celebrates the astonishing influence of Spain on European art. Presenter Andrew Graham-Dixon immerses himself in true Spanish culture and meets the people who live and work with this artistic legacy. Episode 3 The Mystical North – In the final part he reveals how the north of the country has produced some of the most dazzling and iconic art of the modern age. Spain’s turbulent history has shaped artists from Francisco Goya to Pablo Picasso. Graham-Dixon argues that Spanish architecture is the art form now taking the nation forward in the new millennium.

Inside The Forbidden City Episode 2 Survival

The Forbidden City in Beijing was an ancient palace whose very name inspired awe and fear. Until the 20th century the Forbidden City was one of the most secret places on earth. In the past people who trespassed paid with their lives but today the price of an entrance ticket is cheaper and 8 million visitors a year walk where once only emperors trod. Episode 2 Survival – Focuses on the time of the last Emperor Pu Yi and the restoration of the Forbidden City during the 20th century. With the emperor gone there was no guarantee the Forbidden City would survive. As the 600th anniversery of its construction approaches an ambitious restoration project is attempting to turn back the clock and return the palace to its former glory. The renovation has solved some old mysteries and uncovered some new ones.

Great Artists with Tim Marlow Episode 11 Rembrandt

A major 14 part television series in which art historian Tim Marlow takes a fresh look at the most important artworks of some of the greatest artists in history. Shot on location in over 50 galleriesmuseums, churches and palaces throughout Europe and the United States, this series is a comprehensive survey of the history of Western art. Both intelligent and informative, the series aims to provide an uncomplicated and accessible analysis of the works and artists featured including Giotto, Michelangelo and Raphael.

Devil’s Bible

Allegedly made from the skins of 160 donkeys the Codex Gigas is the world’s largest and most mysterious medieval manuscript. According to legend, the cursed text sprang from a doomed monk’s pact with the Devil. Experts attempt to uncover its secrets. For the first time ever, a team of scholars and scientists embark on a quest to unravel the secrets of the Codex Gigas, or Devil’s Bible. Enshrouded in mystery and steeped in dark history, superstition and fear has clouded this medieval manuscript for centuries. Evidence of Lucifer’s hand seems to pervade the tome, including darkened pages, magic spells, and a full page portrait of the Devil. Forensic document experts team up to investigate the ancient Codex safely locked away in Sweden’s National Library. With ultra-violet fluorescence imaging, hand writing analysis and a recreation of the text itself, they’ll attempt to uncover the truth of the Devil’s Bible.

Great Museums In Our Time The Museum of Modern Art

What do the superstars of modern art, van Gogh, Matisse, Picasso, Pollock, Warhol, have in common with the Vincent Black Shadow motorcycle and an Apple iPod? All share the stage at New York’s Museum of Modern Art (MoMA). At MoMA, the two big questions are: What makes it modern? And, what makes it art? MoMA’s experts, along with David Rockefeller (son of MoMA founder Abby Aldrich Rockefeller) discuss the museum’s development and its peerless collection of modern art.

Your Paintings: A Culture Show Special

For yearsthousands of paintings owned by the British public have been hidden away and inaccessible, until now. Thanks to the work of the Your Paintings project, over 200,000 works in our national collections have been painstakingly uncovered, photographed and put online, some for the very first time, allowing art experts and amateur sleuths alike to make connections and discoveries that wouldn’t have been possible before. Alastair Sooke teams up with art detective Dr. Bendor Grosvenor to unearth some hidden gems and find out what the paintings say about British society.

Art of Spain Episode 3 The Mystical North

This series celebrates the astonishing influence of Spain on European art. Presenter Andrew Graham-Dixon immerses himself in true Spanish culture and meets the people who live and work with this artistic legacy. Episode 3 The Mystical North – In the final part he reveals how the north of the country has produced some of the most dazzling and iconic art of the modern age. Spain’s turbulent history has shaped artists from Francisco Goya to Pablo Picasso. Graham-Dixon argues that Spanish architecture is the art form now taking the nation forward in the new millennium.

Medieval Season Illuminations Treasures Of The Middle Ages

Art critic Andrew Graham-Dixon visits an exhibition at the Fitzwilliam MuseumCambridge, which contains a treasure trove of the world’s most important illuminated manuscripts. Germaine Greer joins the modern day illustrator Quentin Blake to consider the religious and political power of these beautiful medieval masterpieces, and to assess their place in the history of art and book production.

Great Artists with Tim Marlow Episode 13 Turner

A major 14 part television series in which art historian Tim Marlow takes a fresh look at the most important artworks of some of the greatest artists in history. Shot on location in over 50 galleriesmuseums, churches and palaces throughout Europe and the United States, this series is a comprehensive survey of the history of Western art. Both intelligent and informative, the series aims to provide an uncomplicated and accessible analysis of the works and artists featured including Giotto, Michelangelo and Raphael.

Hastings 1066 Tapestry of a Battle

The great battle fought near the English seaside town of Hastings on October 14th 1066 was perhaps the most significant in England’s history. This documentary features atmospheric original reconstruction and reenactment footage plus dramatised eye witness accounts. The very latest 3D computer mapping techniques combine with delightful images from the remarkable Bayeux Tapestry to tell the dramatic story of a battle which remains one of the most famous in military history.

Great Museums Mind Over Matter The Boston Children’s Museum

Rummaging through a trunk of old clothes in the Grandparent’s Attic displaychildren are trying on the business of being adults. Play is learning at the Boston Children’s Museum (founded 1913), which revolutionized the American museum experience half a century ago by getting objects out of cases and into children’s hands.

People's Century Episode 6 Great Escape 1927

A departure from other documentaries that observe history as the actions of great men People’s Century considers the Century from the view of common people. Most persons interviewed were ordinary men and women who closely witnessed various events and they give personal accounts how developments in the Twentieth Century affected their lives. Episode 6 Great Escape 1927 – The cinema excites, inspires and influences people seeking escape from their usually dull lives. Hollywood booms in the 1920s, and its movies dominate European screens after the Second World War, bringing alluring images of America. Censorship is introduced after concerns are raised of cinema’s perceived affect on morals. Television will however cut short cinema’s future, in the west. Clips shown in this episode come from silent films (Salome, Raja Harishchandra, Cinderella, Son of the Sheik, Sherlock Jr. and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde), musicals (Achut Kanya, Sing As We Go, Flying Down to Rio, The Stars Shine, On the Town, Chandralekha and Mother India), propaganda films (Earth, The Sea Hawk, Know Your Enemy: Japan, The Fall of Berlin and Luciano Serra pilota), and films with allegorical messages (Les Visiteurs du Soir, Ladri di biciclette and Meet Mr. Lucifer). The introductory scene shows audience observing the first sound film, The Jazz Singer.

Artifacts Episode 1 A Brush with Wisdom

How did an Indian Buddhist shrine influence a Japanese pagoda? How are Italian pigs and cowry shells related to porcelain? These intriguing questions are investigated in Artifactsa series that explores the origins and hidden connections among the art and artifacts of the great cultures and belief systems across Asia to understand the impact of calligraphy, porcelain, architecture, metallurgy, wood block printing and silk on Asian history and on the history of the world in general. Episode 1 A Brush with Wisdom – Enter the hidden world of Chinese painting. In China, they say to understand painting you need to understand calligraphy – the art of writing Chinese characters with a brush.

The Divine Michelangelo Episode 1

To produce one of the world’s great masterpieces is impressive. To create three is truly astonishingbut this is exactly what Michelangelo did five hundred years ago. With his own hands he designed and created, the David, the ceiling of the Sistine chapel, and the dome of St Peter’s. Episode 1 – Michelangelo’s path to success was plagued with difficulties. Trace the troubled origins of his genius, from boyhood beatings from his father, to fights with fellow artists. His father’s feeling that his obsession with art would bring disgrace to the family failed to deter the young, determined Michelangelo. The tempestuous young Michelangelo made a name for himself. Aged 26, he took on the seemingly impossible challenge of sculpting a colossal statue of the biblical hero, David, and design a structure to transport the sculpture, which weighed several tons, across the uneven roads without the giant crashing to the ground. It was no mean feat even by today’s standards. To illustrate the technical skills that Michelangelo displayed, the programme enlists engineer Nick McLean to follow in Michelangelo’s footsteps.

Great Museums A Woman’s Touch The National Museum of Women in the Arts

The National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington D.C. offers the single most important collection of art by women in the world. The museum provides an astonishing survey of women artists representing every major artistic period from 16th-century Dutch and Flemish still life to 20th-century abstract expressionism. This Great Museums special reflects on everything from how women artists have been overshadowed in art history to feminism and the French Revolution to the memorable feminine artistic expressions of the late 19th century. The good news is that due to shining stars like the National Museum of Women in the Arts women artists in the 20th century are anonymous no more! The program integrates themes of history and diversity with art the great common denominator.

Japan in Colour The Wonderful World of Albert Kahn

In 1908the French banker and philanthropist Albert Kahn launched one of the most ambitious projects in the history of photography. A pacifist, internationalist and utopian idealist, Kahn decided to use his private fortune to improve understanding between the nations of the world. To this end, he created what he called his Archive of the Planet. For the next two decades, he dispatched professional photographers to document the everyday lives of people in more than 50 countries all around the world. Kahn’s wealth enabled him to supply his photographers with the most advanced camera technology available.

Great Museums New Orleans A Living Museum of Music

An intimate look at the traditions associated with New Orleans music and the preservation of those traditions through the work of local musicians and educators who mentor young talent. narrated by actor Wendell Pierceis an intimate look at the traditions associated with New Orleans’ music and the preservation of those traditions through the work of local musicians and educators who mentor young talent; museum curators who care for musical treasures; historians and archivists who research and document the stories; activists working to protect, heal and inspire the many musicians whose livelihoods were taken away by Katrina. All are committed to the preservation of the rich musical heritage of New Orleans, as well as the future of New Orleans music. The living museum is a manifestation of participation proclaims Ellis Marsalis.

Artifacts Episode 3 The Mystery of Porcelain

How did an Indian Buddhist shrine influence a Japanese pagoda? How are Italian pigs and cowry shells related to porcelain? Why did the ferocious warriors of Mongolia wear silk underwear? These intriguing questions are investigated in Artifactsa series that explores the origins and hidden connections among the art and artifacts of the great cultures and belief systems across Asia to understand the impact of calligraphy, porcelain, architecture, metallurgy, wood block printing and silk on Asian history and on the history of the world in general. Episode 3 The Mystery of Porcelain – When pieces of Chinese porcelain were first seen in the West, they were so rare and exquisite that they very quickly became more valuable than gold. Why? Because Europeans really had no idea how porcelain was made, and the medieval Italian merchants who first brought porcelain to Europe couldn’t believe it was man made.

The Divine Michelangelo Episode 2

To produce one of the world’s great masterpieces is impressive. To create three is truly astonishingbut this is exactly what Michelangelo did five hundred years ago. With his own hands he designed and created, the David, the ceiling of the Sistine chapel, and the dome of St Peter’s. Episode 2 – The story of Michelangelo’s titanic struggle to paint the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. From 1508 to 1512 this is exactly what Michelangelo was forced by Pope Julius II to paint the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. Michelangelo viewed it as a trap set by his enemies in the Vatican and was horrified that he would have to stoop to what he considered the lowly and inferior craft of painting. This programme explores some of the main challenges he faced by recruiting two modern fresco artists, Fleur Kelly and Leo Stevenson. Having established his genius as a sculptor and painter Michelangelo went on to create the original and beautiful work, culminating in the dome of St Peter’s. In his later years, Michelangelo’s poetry also blossomed.

Great Museums A World of Art The Metropolitan Museum of Art

What makes a masterpiece? In this visually stunning high definition productionA World of Art, the magnificence of America’s premier art museum lights up the screen. One of the architectural glories of New York, the Met stretches 1000 feet along Fifth Avenue. Inside is a dazzling three dimensional encyclopedia of world art, radiating 5,000 years of artistic history. Founded in 1870, the Metropolitan Museum of Art was built on the shoulders of capitalism J.P. Morgan, Havemeyer, Lehman, Rockefeller, and Annenberg are just a few of the names behind the Met’s collections. Met is the largest art museum in the United States with among the most significant art collections. Its permanent collection contains more than two million works, divided among nineteen curatorial departments. The main building, located on the eastern edge of Central Park along Manhattan’s Museum Mile, is by area one of the world’s largest art galleries. Represented in the permanent collection are works of art from classical antiquity and Ancient Egypt, paintings and sculptures from nearly all the European masters, and an extensive collection of American and modern art. The Met also maintains extensive holdings of African, Asian, Oceanic, Byzantine, and Islamic art. The museum is also home to encyclopedic collections of musical instruments, costumes and accessories, and antique weapons and armor from around the world. Several notable interiors, ranging from 1st century Rome through modern American design, are permanently installed in the Met’s galleries.

Living with Michael Jackson

Martin Bashir’s interview documentary with Michael Jackson from February2003 filmed on location with Michael at the Neverland Ranch and in Las Vegas, Berlin, and Miami. This is the program that Jackson rebutted and began legal proceedings against Bashir for breach of contract. Althought it casts a negative light on Michael it also has many candid and revealing moments that show the child like qualities that characterized his personality and influenced his behavior.

Great Museums Riches Rivals and Radicals 100 Years of Museums in America

American is a land of museums. America’s museum offer solitudesanctuary and discovery. They reflect who we were, who we are, and who we hope to be. Visit some of America’s museums coast-to-coast. Meet the characters whose fervor fueled the revolution that changed America’s museums. Narrated by Susan Stamberg. Discover the commanding and charismatic characters whose fervor fueled the 20th-century revolution that changed America’s museums from dusty and elitist to dynamic and democratic! This landmark public television special features museum stories coast-to-coast. Riches, Rivals, and Radicals is hosted by award-winning national correspondent Susan Stamberg, who has covered the world of museums and the arts throughout her broadcasting career.

Artifacts Episode 5 Prints of the Floating World

How did an Indian Buddhist shrine influence a Japanese pagoda? How are Italian pigs and cowry shells related to porcelain? These intriguing questions are investigated in Artifactsa series that explores the origins and hidden connections among the art and artifacts of the great cultures and belief systems across Asia to understand the impact of calligraphy, porcelain, architecture, metallurgy, wood block printing and silk on Asian history and on the history of the world in general. Episode 5 Prints of the Floating World – Today’s Japan. Everywhere you look, amazing images fight for your attention. This is the graphic art for which Japan is justly famous. It has it’s roots in the age of the woodblock print, or Ukiyo – e an art form whose impact was as revolutionary in Japan as Gutenberg’s printed books were in the west.

The Genius of Beethoven Episode 1 The Rebel

A three part drama documentary series about Ludwig van Beethoven presented by conductor Charles Hazlewood. It takes eyewitness accounts of the composer’s tragic life and weaves them into analysis of his groundbreaking music. The Rebel – This first programme looks at Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata and 2nd Symphonyand charts his turbulent early years as a pianist and composer in Vienna, after having rejected his abusive alcoholic father.

Great Museums American Soul The DuSable Museum of African-American History

Founded in 1961the DuSable is one of the first African-American museums in the U.S. It follows African-American history from its beginning on the shores of Africa to a celebration of African-American achievements including those of Bessie Coleman, the nations first black female aviator; World War II Tuskegee airmen; Major Robert Lawrence, the nation’s first black astronaut; and Harold Washington, Chicago’s first black mayor. The museum is dedicated to the collection, preservation, interpretation, and dissemination of the history and culture of Africans and Americans of African descent. Weaving themes of art, history, and diversity, it also tells us Whats American about Americans? and What Shall I Tell My Children who are Black?

Merthyr War Memorial: Behind the Stone

Documentary telling the story behind the Pontmorlais First World War memorial in Merthyr Tydfil. In recent yearsthe memorial has been suffering from neglect and vandalism. The programme looks at how a new generation of children from Cyfarthfa Junior school in Merthyr are introduced to the idea of why war memorials were erected, and their significance in the community. The children took part in a Heritage Lottery project where they helped produce an animation film about the Pontmorlais memorial alongside professional film makers. The film follows the children’s exploration of war, through a series of workshops and visits which are locally and nationally based, from Cyfarthfa Castle Museum to the Cenotaph and the Imperial War Museum in London. The four minute animation film, which the children helped produce, is shown in the documentary.

Great Museums The Blues Lives On The Delta Blues Museum

Narrated by Morgan Freeman. Located in an old depot in ClarksdaleMississippi, where Muddy Waters boarded the train to carry the Blues to the world, this small museum tells the powerful story of the origins of the Delta Blues and its ultimate transformation into Rock-n-Roll. Interviews include actor and native son, Morgan Freeman and blues artists Charlie Musselwhite and Super Chikan Johnson. Featured are Muddy Waters’ sharecropper cabin; Sonny Boy Williamson’s harmonicas; B.B. King’s guitar “Lucille;” and the annual Sunflower River Blues festival which brings together rising talents and established stars of America’s most enduring music.

Biography Rita Hayworth

American film actress Rita Hayworth is best known for her stunning explosive sexual charisma on screen in films throughout the 1930s and 1940s. Trained as a dancershe hit stardom as an actress with her appearance in The Strawberry Blonde (1941). She is best known for her performance in Charles Vidor’s Gilda (1946). Her career ended with Ralph Nelson’s The Wrath of God (1972). Hayworth died of Alzheimer’s disease on May 14, 1987.

The Genius of Beethoven Episode 3 Faith and Fury

A three part drama documentary series about Ludwig van Beethoven presented by conductor Charles Hazlewood. It takes eyewitness accounts of the composer’s tragic life and weaves them into analysis of his groundbreaking music. Faith and Fury – Beethoven again revolutionises musical composition with works such as the Hammerklavier Sonatathe Missa Solemnis, the 9th Symphony and the baffling late string quartets all composed when he was profoundly deaf.

Great Museums The Ellis Island Immigration Museum

More than 100 million Americans can trace their ancestry to New York’s Ellis Island. Ellis Island is more than a museumit is hallowed ground; it is the place where many immigrants from all over the world first touched American soil. Through the museum’s oral history project and through the everyday objects on display a pair of boots, a cooking pot, religious artifacts and traditional clothing the museum strives to give voice to people whose lives have not typically been seen as history.

Byzantium Episode 2 Heaven on Earth

For more than 1,000 years, the Byzantine Empire was the eye of the entire world – the origin of great literature, fine art and modern government. Heir to Greece and Rome, it was the first Christian empire, spanning 11 centuries and three continents. In the end, plundered and sacked by invaders, Byzantium nearly became extinct. Episode 2 Heaven on Earth – You can’t have Jesus king of the world unless he looks like a king. Christians zre getting their iconography from – straight from the pagan faith. But When Christianity took over the Roman Empire, it attacked and swept away all these signs. Now these signs were as old as man himself, and Christianity was pretty poorly supplied with alternatives. After all, it was a language of books and words. But unless it was to fail, it had to develop and develop quickly a whole new set of images for the world.

The Great War Episode 19 The Hell Where Youth And Laughter Go

First broadcast in 1964The Great War was the definitive film account of the world shattering events of World War I (1914 – 1918) a landmark history series widely regarded as a documentary masterpiece. 26 Episodes. The main narrator was Michael Redgrave. It was a co-production involving the resources of the Imperial War Museum, the BBC, CBC and ABC. The series, unparalleled at the time for its depth of research, range of source material and historical accuracy – all presented in a sequence of clear narratives – is now considered one of the finest achievements of BBC documentary. With few exceptions, successive blocks of episodes are devoted to each year of the war episodes 1 – 6 to 1914, 7 – 10 to 1915, 11 – 14 to 1916, 15 – 19 to 1917, 20 – 23 and 26 to 1918.

Raphael A Mortal God

Docudrama depicting the life and times of the most flamboyant and colourful Renaissance artist of all. Raffaello Sanzio da Urbinoknown as Raphael, was an Italian painter and architect of the High Renaissance. His work is admired for its clarity of form, ease of composition, and visual achievement of the Neoplatonic ideal of human grandeur. The programme concentrated on the angelic reputation of this often misunderstood painter. The reality was that he was a freakishly precocious firebrand who was resented by most of his contemporaries, it was an every day story of lust, ambition and a romantically early death.

Art of Germany Episode 1 A Divided Land

Andrew Graham-Dixon begins his exploration of German art by looking at the rich and often neglected art of the German middle ages and Renaissance. He visits the towering cathedral of Colognea place which encapsulates the varied and often contradictory character of German art. In Munch he gets to grips with the earliest paintings of the Northern Renaissance, the woodcuts of Albrecht Durer and the cosmic visions of the painter Albrecht Altdorfer. Andrew also embarks on a tour of the Bavarian countryside, discovering some of the little known treasures of German limewood sculpture.

Great Museums Trial By Fire The New York City Fire Museum

Housed in a 1904 firehouse the former home of Engine 30 this museum chronicles the history of firefighting from colonial times to the presentincluding the heroic efforts of firefighters on September 11, 2001. The museum features horse and hand-drawn fire carriages, fire buckets and parade hats and modern day equipment. Firefighters, many of whom were involved in the World Trade Center tragedy, serve as the museum’s volunteers.

Great Artists with Tim Marlow Episode 2 Leonardo

A major 14 part television series in which art historian Tim Marlow takes a fresh look at the most important artworks of some of the greatest artists in history. Shot on location in over 50 galleriesmuseums, churches and palaces throughout Europe and the United States, this series is a comprehensive survey of the history of Western art. Both intelligent and informative, the series aims to provide an uncomplicated and accessible analysis of the works and artists featured including Giotto, Michelangelo and Raphael.

The Great War Episode 27 Voices From The Western Front

First broadcast in 1964The Great War was the definitive film account of the world shattering events of World War I (1914 – 1918) a landmark history series widely regarded as a documentary masterpiece. 26 Episodes. The main narrator was Michael Redgrave. It was a co-production involving the resources of the Imperial War Museum, the BBC, CBC and ABC. The series, unparalleled at the time for its depth of research, range of source material and historical accuracy – all presented in a sequence of clear narratives – is now considered one of the finest achievements of BBC documentary. With few exceptions, successive blocks of episodes are devoted to each year of the war episodes 1 – 6 to 1914, 7 – 10 to 1915, 11 – 14 to 1916, 15 – 19 to 1917, 20 – 23 and 26 to 1918.

Scotland on Screen

Scottish movie star Alan Cumming returns to his homeland to take a tour of the locations of some classic Scottish movies. He celebrates some of the weird and wonderful movies inspired by Scotland such as The Wicker Man, which was filmed in Dumfries and Galloway. Film experts and actors, including Peter Mullen and David Hayman, compare the blockbusters Braveheart and Rob Roy, while Edinburgh’s contribution to Scottish cinema is celebrated by the contrasting films The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie and Trainspotting. Director Bill Forsyth meets Cumming in Cumbernauld – the setting of Forsyth’s film Gregory’s Girl – and explains why the new town was such a fitting location for his enduringly popular film.

Art of Germany Episode 2 Dream And Machine

Andrew Graham-Dixon continues his exploration of German art by looking at the tumultuous 19th century and early 20th centuryand how artists were at the forefront of Germany’s drive to become a single nation. Andrew travels to the birthplace of Caspar David Friedrich, the most influential of the German Romantics, to discover how the Baltic coast impacted on his mysterious paintings of the German landscape. He also visits Berlin and explores the art of the powerful Prussian state, which would spearhead the unification of Germany in 1871.

Great Museums Triumph of the Spirit The National D-Day Museum

Now called The National World War Two Museum this New Orleans-based museum talks about war in human terms and celebrates the American spirit through the personal stories and artifacts of the American men and women who sacrificed and prevailed in an epic struggle against tyranny. One of the museum’s many moving belongings is a soldier’s Christmas letter to my dear little boys a father struggles to explain war to his young children.

Great Artists with Tim Marlow Episode 5 Raphael

A major 14 part television series in which art historian Tim Marlow takes a fresh look at the most important artworks of some of the greatest artists in history. Shot on location in over 50 galleriesmuseums, churches and palaces throughout Europe and the United States, this series is a comprehensive survey of the history of Western art. Both intelligent and informative, the series aims to provide an uncomplicated and accessible analysis of the works and artists featured including Giotto, Michelangelo and Raphael.

The Medici Godfathers of the Renaissance Episode 2 The Magnificent Medici

From a small Italian community in 15th century Florence the Medici family would rise to rule Europe in many ways. Using charm, patronage, skill, duplicity and ruthlessness, they would amass unparalleled wealth and unprecedented power. They would also ignite the most important cultural and artistic revolution in Western history the European Renaissance. But the forces of change the Medici helped unleash would one day topple their ordered world. The Magnificient Medici – Florence, August 1466 Lorenzo de’Medici, the 17 year old heir to the dynasty, foils a murderous plot against his father and saves his family from a coup d’etat. The Medici still dominate Florence, but now take extra precautions, picking a useful bride for Lorenzo. Clarice Orsini, a baron’s daughter and cardinal’s niece, brings connections, class, and military muscle to the Medici dynasty. In the workshops of Florence, business has never been better. Under Medici patronage, artists like Sandro Botticelli go on to redefine the Renaisssance itself. For now, Botticelli’s Adoration of the Magi confirms his position at the heart of Medici power.