Guilty Pleasures Luxury in the Middle Ages

Luxury isn’t always a question of the expensive and beautiful for the rich and powerfulit’s always been much more and more important than that. The story of luxury is about an idea that touches on democracy and patriotism on social harmony and epic courage and even on the divine. Because it is so important there has always been more than one definition of what luxury actually is. One thing all can agree on is that luxury is a rare thing, it divides society into the haves and have nots. Host Cambridge University academic Dr Michael Scott asks the question Do we love luxury or hate it or both? He presents the view that the best way to understand today’s anxious response toward luxury is to think about how it operated in the past and to understand how that past continues to impact society today. Episode Luxury in the Middle Ages – follows the clash between luxury and Christianity which convulsed medieval Europe. Luxury was a roadblock on the road to heavenso the church was quick to condemn the jewellery and gorgeous weapons of the early medieval world. Yet the church also had its own form of luxury, in the form of manuscripts designed to do the work of God through astonishment and display. And to some extent it worked, as by 1200 medieval boys’ toys like warhorses and tournaments were suffused with Christian ideas of chivalry and gentility. But trade growth brought new luxuries to Europe, condemned in turn by the church, like exotic spices from the East, spicy food led to spicy conduct and to the sin of lechery, said the preachers. But soon the Black Death paradoxically liberated luxury from the church by initiating a new world of relative luxury and consumerism, the luxury world we inhabit today.

Great Artists with Tim Marlow Episode 5 Raphael

A major 14 part television series in which art historian Tim Marlow takes a fresh look at the most important artworks of some of the greatest artists in history. Shot on location in over 50 galleriesmuseums, churches and palaces throughout Europe and the United States, this series is a comprehensive survey of the history of Western art. Both intelligent and informative, the series aims to provide an uncomplicated and accessible analysis of the works and artists featured including Giotto, Michelangelo and Raphael.

Wayward Women Episode 4 Artists & Adventurers

Wayward women tells the tale of some of history’s most fascinating females and combines strong story telling from celebrities and academics with the unique atmosphere and ambience of a burlesque venue. This series focuses on women from Yorkshire and the North East of England. It is a great short introduction to women you may not have heard of before. It is not an in depth programbut it is intended to spark your interest so that you will explore more on your own. Historians and psychologists add fact to the rumours. Each story is accompanied by artistic re-enactments, archive stills and burlesque artists.Commentors include Germaine Greer, Carol McGiffin, Scott Henshall, Michelle Heaton, Jayne Middlemiss and Simon Donald. Episode 4 Artists & Adventurers features Gertrude Bell (Redcar’s Arabian Adventuress), George Elliott (Flouter of Convention), Margaret Hunt (Lover of Literature), Dorothy Forster (Bamburgh’s Bravest Heart), and Amy Johnson (Hull’s Heavenly Heroine).

Great Museums Horse Power The National Museum of Racing

Learn the history of thoroughbred horse racing at the National Racing Museum and Hall of Fame. Thoroughbred racing is one of America’s oldest sportsand it has a colorful history. Seabiscuit, Man o’ War, Secretariat, Arcaro, and the Jones Boys are all heroes of the turf and names that evoke the clang of the starting gate, the thunder of pounding hooves the sights and sounds of racing. Located at the historic Saratoga Springs racetrack, this museum celebrates the sport and the animals whose grace and beauty have become legendary. General Topics are History, Industry, Popular Culture, Diversity.

Your Paintings: A Culture Show Special

For yearsthousands of paintings owned by the British public have been hidden away and inaccessible, until now. Thanks to the work of the Your Paintings project, over 200,000 works in our national collections have been painstakingly uncovered, photographed and put online, some for the very first time, allowing art experts and amateur sleuths alike to make connections and discoveries that wouldn’t have been possible before. Alastair Sooke teams up with art detective Dr. Bendor Grosvenor to unearth some hidden gems and find out what the paintings say about British society.

Inside The Forbidden City Episode 2 Survival

The Forbidden City in Beijing was an ancient palace whose very name inspired awe and fear. Until the 20th century the Forbidden City was one of the most secret places on earth. In the past people who trespassed paid with their lives but today the price of an entrance ticket is cheaper and 8 million visitors a year walk where once only emperors trod. Episode 2 Survival – Focuses on the time of the last Emperor Pu Yi and the restoration of the Forbidden City during the 20th century. With the emperor gone there was no guarantee the Forbidden City would survive. As the 600th anniversery of its construction approaches an ambitious restoration project is attempting to turn back the clock and return the palace to its former glory. The renovation has solved some old mysteries and uncovered some new ones.

Great Artists with Tim Marlow Episode 6 Titian

A major 14 part television series in which art historian Tim Marlow takes a fresh look at the most important artworks of some of the greatest artists in history. Shot on location in over 50 galleriesmuseums, churches and palaces throughout Europe and the United States, this series is a comprehensive survey of the history of Western art. Both intelligent and informative, the series aims to provide an uncomplicated and accessible analysis of the works and artists featured including Giotto, Michelangelo and Raphael.

Devil’s Bible

Allegedly made from the skins of 160 donkeysthe Codex Gigas is the world’s largest and most mysterious medieval manuscript. According to legend, the cursed text sprang from a doomed monk’s pact with the Devil. Experts attempt to uncover its secrets. For the first time ever, a team of scholars and scientists embark on a quest to unravel the secrets of the Codex Gigas, or Devil’s Bible. Enshrouded in mystery and steeped in dark history, superstition and fear has clouded this medieval manuscript for centuries. Evidence of Lucifer’s hand seems to pervade the tome, including darkened pages, magic spells, and a full page portrait of the Devil. Forensic document experts team up to investigate the ancient Codex safely locked away in Sweden’s National Library. With ultra-violet fluorescence imaging, hand writing analysis and a recreation of the text itself, they’ll attempt to uncover the truth of the Devil’s Bible.

Great Museums In Our Time The Museum of Modern Art

What do the superstars of modern art, van Gogh, Matisse, Picasso, Pollock, Warhol, have in common with the Vincent Black Shadow motorcycle and an Apple iPod? All share the stage at New York’s Museum of Modern Art (MoMA). At MoMA, the two big questions are: What makes it modern? And, what makes it art? MoMA’s experts, along with David Rockefeller (son of MoMA founder Abby Aldrich Rockefeller) discuss the museum’s development and its peerless collection of modern art.

The Genius of Beethoven Episode 1 The Rebel

A three part drama documentary series about Ludwig van Beethoven presented by conductor Charles Hazlewood. It takes eyewitness accounts of the composer’s tragic life and weaves them into analysis of his groundbreaking music. The Rebel – This first programme looks at Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata and 2nd Symphonyand charts his turbulent early years as a pianist and composer in Vienna, after having rejected his abusive alcoholic father.

Great Artists with Tim Marlow Episode 10 Velazquez

A major 14 part television series in which art historian Tim Marlow takes a fresh look at the most important artworks of some of the greatest artists in history. Shot on location in over 50 galleriesmuseums, churches and palaces throughout Europe and the United States, this series is a comprehensive survey of the history of Western art. Both intelligent and informative, the series aims to provide an uncomplicated and accessible analysis of the works and artists featured including Giotto, Michelangelo and Raphael.

Hastings 1066 Tapestry of a Battle

The great battle fought near the English seaside town of Hastings on October 14th 1066 was perhaps the most significant in England’s history. This documentary features atmospheric original reconstruction and reenactment footage plus dramatised eye witness accounts. The very latest 3D computer mapping techniques combine with delightful images from the remarkable Bayeux Tapestry to tell the dramatic story of a battle which remains one of the most famous in military history.

Great Museums Mind Over Matter The Boston Children’s Museum

Rummaging through a trunk of old clothes in the Grandparent’s Attic displaychildren are trying on the business of being adults. Play is learning at the Boston Children’s Museum (founded 1913), which revolutionized the American museum experience half a century ago by getting objects out of cases and into children’s hands.

The Genius of Beethoven Episode 2 Love and Loss

A three part drama documentary series about Ludwig van Beethoven presented by conductor Charles Hazlewood. It takes eyewitness accounts of the composer’s tragic life and weaves them into analysis of his groundbreaking music. Love and Loss – The music of Beethoven’s creative middle years is exploredalongside the dramatised recollections of his family and friends. In this period he wrote five symphonies, four concertos, and his only opera – Fidelio.

Great Artists with Tim Marlow Episode 11 Rembrandt

A major 14 part television series in which art historian Tim Marlow takes a fresh look at the most important artworks of some of the greatest artists in history. Shot on location in over 50 galleriesmuseums, churches and palaces throughout Europe and the United States, this series is a comprehensive survey of the history of Western art. Both intelligent and informative, the series aims to provide an uncomplicated and accessible analysis of the works and artists featured including Giotto, Michelangelo and Raphael.

Impressionism Revenge of the Nice

Matthew Collings has a wonderfully simple and funny way of making you understand the whenwhere, why and how of important is art so this programme will get your head around impressionism in a couple of hours. Matthew Collings will reappraise the Impressionists. The four stars are Courbet, Manet, Monet and Cezanne. In two hours their stories and their art will intertwine. Matt will unpack the principles of Impressionism the strength of color, the flatness, the patterning and the way in which ordinary life is pictured with startling truth and argue that this is the best thing that has ever happened in modern art.

Great Museums New Orleans A Living Museum of Music

An intimate look at the traditions associated with New Orleans music and the preservation of those traditions through the work of local musicians and educators who mentor young talent. narrated by actor Wendell Pierceis an intimate look at the traditions associated with New Orleans’ music and the preservation of those traditions through the work of local musicians and educators who mentor young talent; museum curators who care for musical treasures; historians and archivists who research and document the stories; activists working to protect, heal and inspire the many musicians whose livelihoods were taken away by Katrina. All are committed to the preservation of the rich musical heritage of New Orleans, as well as the future of New Orleans music. The living museum is a manifestation of participation proclaims Ellis Marsalis.

A History of Britain Episode 12 Forces Of Nature

From the dawn of civilization to the 20th centuryA History of Britain re-animates familiar tales and illuminates overlooked aspects of England’s past. Hosted by Simon Schama, this series discards timelines and tiresome lineages for a lively look at the personalities and cultures that infuse British history. Epic themes and towering figures that transformed an island at the edge of the world into the greatest empire on earth. Episode 12 Forces of Nature-Why Britain proved immune to the ideals of the French Revolutionignoring the call of liberty, equality and fraternity so readily embraced by the peasantry of France. Instead, the influence of poets, painters and journalists of the Romantic movement persuaded the nation of the primacy of feeling over reason, and divided opinion on the civil strife across the channel.

The Genius of Beethoven Episode 3 Faith and Fury

A three part drama documentary series about Ludwig van Beethoven presented by conductor Charles Hazlewood. It takes eyewitness accounts of the composer’s tragic life and weaves them into analysis of his groundbreaking music. Faith and Fury – Beethoven again revolutionises musical composition with works such as the Hammerklavier Sonatathe Missa Solemnis, the 9th Symphony and the baffling late string quartets all composed when he was profoundly deaf.

Great Artists with Tim Marlow Episode 13 Turner

A major 14 part television series in which art historian Tim Marlow takes a fresh look at the most important artworks of some of the greatest artists in history. Shot on location in over 50 galleriesmuseums, churches and palaces throughout Europe and the United States, this series is a comprehensive survey of the history of Western art. Both intelligent and informative, the series aims to provide an uncomplicated and accessible analysis of the works and artists featured including Giotto, Michelangelo and Raphael.

Merthyr War Memorial: Behind the Stone

Documentary telling the story behind the Pontmorlais First World War memorial in Merthyr Tydfil. In recent yearsthe memorial has been suffering from neglect and vandalism. The programme looks at how a new generation of children from Cyfarthfa Junior school in Merthyr are introduced to the idea of why war memorials were erected, and their significance in the community. The children took part in a Heritage Lottery project where they helped produce an animation film about the Pontmorlais memorial alongside professional film makers. The film follows the children’s exploration of war, through a series of workshops and visits which are locally and nationally based, from Cyfarthfa Castle Museum to the Cenotaph and the Imperial War Museum in London. The four minute animation film, which the children helped produce, is shown in the documentary.

Great Museums Riches Rivals and Radicals 100 Years of Museums in America

American is a land of museums. America’s museum offer solitudesanctuary and discovery. They reflect who we were, who we are, and who we hope to be. Visit some of America’s museums coast-to-coast. Meet the characters whose fervor fueled the revolution that changed America’s museums. Narrated by Susan Stamberg. Discover the commanding and charismatic characters whose fervor fueled the 20th-century revolution that changed America’s museums from dusty and elitist to dynamic and democratic! This landmark public television special features museum stories coast-to-coast. Riches, Rivals, and Radicals is hosted by award-winning national correspondent Susan Stamberg, who has covered the world of museums and the arts throughout her broadcasting career.

A History of Britain Episode 13 Victoria and her Sisters

From the dawn of civilization to the 20th centuryA History of Britain re-animates familiar tales and illuminates overlooked aspects of England’s past. Hosted by Simon Schama, this series discards timelines and tiresome lineages for a lively look at the personalities and cultures that infuse British history. Epic themes and towering figures that transformed an island at the edge of the world into the greatest empire on earth. Episode 13 Victoria and Her Sisters – The changing role of women in the Victorian eralooking at the work of novelist Elizabeth Gaskell, whose fiction highlighted the plight of needy factory workers. ground breaking efforts of doctor Elizabeth Garrett Anderson, health campaigner Mary Seacole and political activists Harriet Stuart Mill and Annie Besant.

The Genius of Mozart Episode 1 A Miracle of Nature

Charles Hazelwood looks at Mozart’s extraordinary life and music. Miracle of Nature-In this first programme Charles Hazlewood challenges the accepted belief that Mozart was born a genius and thus became almost an immortal being. How could Mozart have touched our universal pulse without drawing from the turmoil of every day life himself? And who witnessed this turmoil first hand?

Great Museums A Woman’s Touch The National Museum of Women in the Arts

The National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington D.C. offers the single most important collection of art by women in the world. The museum provides an astonishing survey of women artists representing every major artistic period from 16th-century Dutch and Flemish still life to 20th-century abstract expressionism. This Great Museums special reflects on everything from how women artists have been overshadowed in art history to feminism and the French Revolution to the memorable feminine artistic expressions of the late 19th century. The good news is that due to shining stars like the National Museum of Women in the Arts women artists in the 20th century are anonymous no more! The program integrates themes of history and diversity with art the great common denominator.

Great Museums The Blues Lives On The Delta Blues Museum

Narrated by Morgan Freeman. Located in an old depot in ClarksdaleMississippi, where Muddy Waters boarded the train to carry the Blues to the world, this small museum tells the powerful story of the origins of the Delta Blues and its ultimate transformation into Rock-n-Roll. Interviews include actor and native son, Morgan Freeman and blues artists Charlie Musselwhite and Super Chikan Johnson. Featured are Muddy Waters’ sharecropper cabin; Sonny Boy Williamson’s harmonicas; B.B. King’s guitar “Lucille;” and the annual Sunflower River Blues festival which brings together rising talents and established stars of America’s most enduring music.

A History of Britain Episode 15 The Two Winstons

From the dawn of civilization to the 20th centuryA History of Britain re-animates familiar tales and illuminates overlooked aspects of England’s past. Hosted by Simon Schama, this series discards timelines and tiresome lineages for a lively look at the personalities and cultures that infuse British history. Epic themes and towering figures that transformed an island at the edge of the world into the greatest empire on earth. Episode 15 The Two Winstons – The lives of Winston Churchill and George Orwellwho created the hero Winston Smith in his novel 1984. These men had a huge personal impact on the historian and touched many of the key events of the 20th century, including the World Wars and the Depression.

The Genius of Mozart Episode 2 A Passion For The Stage

Charles Hazelwood looks at Mozart’s extraordinary life and music. A Passion for the Stage – Charles Hazlewood examines three of Mozart’s greatest operasand shows how The Magic Flute. Idomeneo, and The Marriage of Figaro revolutionised the musical theatre. The first great phase of Mozart’s brief life was that of the traveling child prodigy gifted as a performer and writer of music who grew into the genius who, working within the restrictions of his time, began to rewrite the musical rules. But there was another facet to Mozart the adult thinker aware of the bigger picture, passionately attached to the progressive values of the Enlightenment impressively well read, a speaker of most European languages (even a little English), an Austrian Catholic, a Freemason and above all a composer at the height of his formidable powers, determined to succeed in the most difficult and lucrative area of all – Opera.

Great Museums A World of Art The Metropolitan Museum of Art

What makes a masterpiece? In this visually stunning high definition productionA World of Art, the magnificence of America’s premier art museum lights up the screen. One of the architectural glories of New York, the Met stretches 1000 feet along Fifth Avenue. Inside is a dazzling three dimensional encyclopedia of world art, radiating 5,000 years of artistic history. Founded in 1870, the Metropolitan Museum of Art was built on the shoulders of capitalism J.P. Morgan, Havemeyer, Lehman, Rockefeller, and Annenberg are just a few of the names behind the Met’s collections. Met is the largest art museum in the United States with among the most significant art collections. Its permanent collection contains more than two million works, divided among nineteen curatorial departments. The main building, located on the eastern edge of Central Park along Manhattan’s Museum Mile, is by area one of the world’s largest art galleries. Represented in the permanent collection are works of art from classical antiquity and Ancient Egypt, paintings and sculptures from nearly all the European masters, and an extensive collection of American and modern art. The Met also maintains extensive holdings of African, Asian, Oceanic, Byzantine, and Islamic art. The museum is also home to encyclopedic collections of musical instruments, costumes and accessories, and antique weapons and armor from around the world. Several notable interiors, ranging from 1st century Rome through modern American design, are permanently installed in the Met’s galleries.

Raphael A Mortal God

Docudrama depicting the life and times of the most flamboyant and colourful Renaissance artist of all. Raffaello Sanzio da Urbinoknown as Raphael, was an Italian painter and architect of the High Renaissance. His work is admired for its clarity of form, ease of composition, and visual achievement of the Neoplatonic ideal of human grandeur. The programme concentrated on the angelic reputation of this often misunderstood painter. The reality was that he was a freakishly precocious firebrand who was resented by most of his contemporaries, it was an every day story of lust, ambition and a romantically early death.

Great Museums The Ellis Island Immigration Museum

More than 100 million Americans can trace their ancestry to New York’s Ellis Island. Ellis Island is more than a museumit is hallowed ground; it is the place where many immigrants from all over the world first touched American soil. Through the museum’s oral history project and through the everyday objects on display a pair of boots, a cooking pot, religious artifacts and traditional clothing the museum strives to give voice to people whose lives have not typically been seen as history.

Artifacts Episode 1 A Brush with Wisdom

How did an Indian Buddhist shrine influence a Japanese pagoda? How are Italian pigs and cowry shells related to porcelain? These intriguing questions are investigated in Artifactsa series that explores the origins and hidden connections among the art and artifacts of the great cultures and belief systems across Asia to understand the impact of calligraphy, porcelain, architecture, metallurgy, wood block printing and silk on Asian history and on the history of the world in general. Episode 1 A Brush with Wisdom – Enter the hidden world of Chinese painting. In China, they say to understand painting you need to understand calligraphy – the art of writing Chinese characters with a brush.

The Genius of Mozart Episode 3 The First Romantic

Charles Hazelwood looks at Mozart’s extraordinary life and music. The First Romantic – The third and final film in the series examines howtowards the end of his life, Mozart mastered the language of instrumental and orchestral writing and how both love and loss provoked in him an extraordinary burst of creativity. This was essentially crystallised in three ambitious works that changed the future course of music his last, great trilogy of symphonies – numbers 39, 40 and 41 – which he wrote in six short weeks.

Great Museums American Soul The DuSable Museum of African-American History

Founded in 1961the DuSable is one of the first African-American museums in the U.S. It follows African-American history from its beginning on the shores of Africa to a celebration of African-American achievements including those of Bessie Coleman, the nations first black female aviator; World War II Tuskegee airmen; Major Robert Lawrence, the nation’s first black astronaut; and Harold Washington, Chicago’s first black mayor. The museum is dedicated to the collection, preservation, interpretation, and dissemination of the history and culture of Africans and Americans of African descent. Weaving themes of art, history, and diversity, it also tells us Whats American about Americans? and What Shall I Tell My Children who are Black?

Scotland on Screen

Scottish movie star Alan Cumming returns to his homeland to take a tour of the locations of some classic Scottish movies. He celebrates some of the weird and wonderful movies inspired by Scotlandsuch as The Wicker Man, which was filmed in Dumfries and Galloway. Film experts and actors, including Peter Mullen and David Hayman, compare the blockbusters Braveheart and Rob Roy, while Edinburgh’s contribution to Scottish cinema is celebrated by the contrasting films The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie and Trainspotting. Director Bill Forsyth meets Cumming in Cumbernauld – the setting of Forsyth’s film Gregory’s Girl – and explains why the new town was such a fitting location for his enduringly popular film.

Great Museums Trial By Fire The New York City Fire Museum

Housed in a 1904 firehouse the former home of Engine 30 this museum chronicles the history of firefighting from colonial times to the presentincluding the heroic efforts of firefighters on September 11, 2001. The museum features horse and hand-drawn fire carriages, fire buckets and parade hats and modern day equipment. Firefighters, many of whom were involved in the World Trade Center tragedy, serve as the museum’s volunteers.

Artifacts Episode 3 The Mystery of Porcelain

How did an Indian Buddhist shrine influence a Japanese pagoda? How are Italian pigs and cowry shells related to porcelain? Why did the ferocious warriors of Mongolia wear silk underwear? These intriguing questions are investigated in Artifactsa series that explores the origins and hidden connections among the art and artifacts of the great cultures and belief systems across Asia to understand the impact of calligraphy, porcelain, architecture, metallurgy, wood block printing and silk on Asian history and on the history of the world in general. Episode 3 The Mystery of Porcelain – When pieces of Chinese porcelain were first seen in the West, they were so rare and exquisite that they very quickly became more valuable than gold. Why? Because Europeans really had no idea how porcelain was made, and the medieval Italian merchants who first brought porcelain to Europe couldn’t believe it was man made.

The Great War Episode 19 The Hell Where Youth And Laughter Go

First broadcast in 1964The Great War was the definitive film account of the world shattering events of World War I (1914 – 1918) a landmark history series widely regarded as a documentary masterpiece. 26 Episodes. The main narrator was Michael Redgrave. It was a co-production involving the resources of the Imperial War Museum, the BBC, CBC and ABC. The series, unparalleled at the time for its depth of research, range of source material and historical accuracy – all presented in a sequence of clear narratives – is now considered one of the finest achievements of BBC documentary. With few exceptions, successive blocks of episodes are devoted to each year of the war episodes 1 – 6 to 1914, 7 – 10 to 1915, 11 – 14 to 1916, 15 – 19 to 1917, 20 – 23 and 26 to 1918.

The Mountain That Had To Be Painted

Documentary about the painters Augustus John and his young protege James Dickson Innes whoin 1911, left London for the wild Arenig Valley in North Wales. Over three years, they created a body of work to rival the visionary landscapes of Matisse. The paintings were the entry point for British art into Post-Impressionism. The Arenig mountain had such a hypnotic fascination for Innes that in 1910 he committed Arenig Fawr obsessively to canvas in a free and impulsive way which, one expert said, no British artist had yet managed. His work excited John, older by nine years, into following him up to North Wales, in due course bringing his chaotic menage along too. It was a fruitful stay. In John’s paintings the mountain’s contours had to compete with a figure, invariably a sinewy female and often swathed in swirling Romany scarves, parked foursquare in the foreground. One of these women was the sultry beauty Euphemia Lamb who bedded both men (among many others) and who would break Innes’s heart. But the profounder relationship of the two men seems to have been, on a creative level, with each other and with the landscape.

Great Museums Triumph of the Spirit The National D-Day Museum

Now called The National World War Two Museum this New Orleans-based museum talks about war in human terms and celebrates the American spirit through the personal stories and artifacts of the American men and women who sacrificed and prevailed in an epic struggle against tyranny. One of the museum’s many moving belongings is a soldier’s Christmas letter to my dear little boys a father struggles to explain war to his young children.

Artifacts Episode 5 Prints of the Floating World

How did an Indian Buddhist shrine influence a Japanese pagoda? How are Italian pigs and cowry shells related to porcelain? These intriguing questions are investigated in Artifactsa series that explores the origins and hidden connections among the art and artifacts of the great cultures and belief systems across Asia to understand the impact of calligraphy, porcelain, architecture, metallurgy, wood block printing and silk on Asian history and on the history of the world in general. Episode 5 Prints of the Floating World – Today’s Japan. Everywhere you look, amazing images fight for your attention. This is the graphic art for which Japan is justly famous. It has it’s roots in the age of the woodblock print, or Ukiyo – e an art form whose impact was as revolutionary in Japan as Gutenberg’s printed books were in the west.

The Great War Episode 27 Voices From The Western Front

First broadcast in 1964The Great War was the definitive film account of the world shattering events of World War I (1914 – 1918) a landmark history series widely regarded as a documentary masterpiece. 26 Episodes. The main narrator was Michael Redgrave. It was a co-production involving the resources of the Imperial War Museum, the BBC, CBC and ABC. The series, unparalleled at the time for its depth of research, range of source material and historical accuracy – all presented in a sequence of clear narratives – is now considered one of the finest achievements of BBC documentary. With few exceptions, successive blocks of episodes are devoted to each year of the war episodes 1 – 6 to 1914, 7 – 10 to 1915, 11 – 14 to 1916, 15 – 19 to 1917, 20 – 23 and 26 to 1918.

The Poet Who Loved the War Ivor Gurney

A charismatic originalIvor Gurney, who prior to the Great War had suffered a nervous breakdown at the Royal College of Music, enlisted as an experiment, he actually found the war invigorating and for a while his mental health improved. Unlike the other war poets Gurney wasn’t a commissioned officer, he was an ordinary front line soldier. A private. The poetry he wrote there is uniquely powerful, capturing the experience of the ordinary soldier, and the this documentary argues that it is the equal of the work of any of the more well known soldier poets of WWI.

Guilty Pleasures Luxury in Ancient Greece

Luxury isn’t always a question of the expensive and beautiful for the rich and powerfulit’s always been much more and more important than that. The story of luxury is about an idea that touches on democracy and patriotism on social harmony and epic courage and even on the divine. Because it is so important there has always been more than one definition of what luxury actually is. One thing all can agree on is that luxury is a rare thing, it divides society into the haves and have nots. Host Cambridge University academic Dr Michael Scott asks the question Do we love luxury or hate it or both? He presents the view that the best way to understand today’s anxious response toward luxury is to think about how it operated in the past and to understand how that past continues to impact society today. Episode Luxury in Ancient Greece – follows the debate about luxury which convulsed ancient Greece from the beginning of the classical era. In Athensit explores the role of luxury in the beginnings of democracy – how certain kinds of luxury came to be forbidden and others embraced. A simple luxury like meat could unite the democracy, and yet a taste for fish could divide it. Some luxuries were associated with effeminacy and foreigners, others with the very idea of democracy.

Biography Rita Hayworth

American film actress Rita Hayworth is best known for her stunning explosive sexual charisma on screen in films throughout the 1930s and 1940s. Trained as a dancershe hit stardom as an actress with her appearance in The Strawberry Blonde (1941). She is best known for her performance in Charles Vidor’s Gilda (1946). Her career ended with Ralph Nelson’s The Wrath of God (1972). Hayworth died of Alzheimer’s disease on May 14, 1987.

The Great War Episode 28 The Finished Fighter

First broadcast in 1964The Great War was the definitive film account of the world shattering events of World War I (1914 – 1918) a landmark history series widely regarded as a documentary masterpiece. 26 Episodes. The main narrator was Michael Redgrave. It was a co-production involving the resources of the Imperial War Museum, the BBC, CBC and ABC. The series, unparalleled at the time for its depth of research, range of source material and historical accuracy – all presented in a sequence of clear narratives – is now considered one of the finest achievements of BBC documentary. With few exceptions, successive blocks of episodes are devoted to each year of the war episodes 1 – 6 to 1914, 7 – 10 to 1915, 11 – 14 to 1916, 15 – 19 to 1917, 20 – 23 and 26 to 1918.

Great Museums Home Base The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum

Nestled between the Adirondacks and the Catskills in central New York State the pastoral village of Cooperstown has a mighty mission: to preserve and protect the story of America’s Game at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. This is much more than just runshits, and errors, say Vice President and Chief Curator Ted Spencer. This is about American life. Baseball has been America’s national pastime for nearly 150 years. Founded in 1939today’s museum preserves history, honors excellence and connects generations through the story of baseball and America, featuring more than 35,000 artifacts, two million documents,500,000 historic photographs, and 10,000 hours of original TV and radio recordings. The adjoining Hall of Fame contains the plaques of more than 275 of baseball’s immortals, including the first five men elected in 1936 – Babe Ruth, Christy Mathewson, Honus Wagner, Ty Cobb, and Walter Johnson.