500 Nations Episode 6 Removal

In September 2004on the last remaining site on the Mall in Washington D.C., the Smithsonian Institution opened the National Museum of the American Indian, inaugurating a new era in the education of all people about Native America. In conjunction with this event, and in response to popular demand 500 nations was broadcast on the Discovery Channel. Episode 6 Removal – Follow the Trail of Tears as Native Americans are displaced even as they adopt American ways. Shawnee leader Tecumseh sparks a return to traditional ways but The Indian Removal Act becomes law in 1830. Many stoically accept, others resist.

Art of Spain Episode 3 The Mystical North

This series celebrates the astonishing influence of Spain on European art. Presenter Andrew Graham-Dixon immerses himself in true Spanish culture and meets the people who live and work with this artistic legacy. Episode 3 The Mystical North – In the final part he reveals how the north of the country has produced some of the most dazzling and iconic art of the modern age. Spain’s turbulent history has shaped artists from Francisco Goya to Pablo Picasso. Graham-Dixon argues that Spanish architecture is the art form now taking the nation forward in the new millennium.

Cathedral Murder at Canterbury

The history of Britain and the aspirations of her Christian communities can be traced in the glorious excesses of the cathedrals. From Norman grandeur to the modern interpretations found in Liverpool and Coventryexplore the changing styles of the cathedrals in our midst. A 5 part series that takes a looks at the ingenuity behind the construction of Britain’s most famous cathedrals, using CGI and reconstructions to describe the dramatic stories of riot, fire, war, murder, and flood that shaped the history of these impressive masterpieces. Murder at Cantebury – Canterbury was at the forefront of an architectural revolution the first Gothic cathedral to be built in Britain. But the building we know today has its origins in the most infamous murder of the medieval age – Thomas Becket in 1170. After his death a devastating fire meant that Canterbury could be rebuilt as a shrine to the martyred archbishop. This is the cathedral as theatre with the story of the murder etched in stone, marble and glass. It takes the pilgrim on a journey from darkness into light – from the horrors of the slaying in the North transept to the new Trinity Chapel where Becket was reburied in a magnificent tomb sparkling with gold and precious stones.

Discover Magazine Hidden Temples of Angkor Wat

Angkor Wat one of the wonders of the ancient world rises from the Cambodian jungle. The magnificent temples and gigantic reservoirs built by the Khmer empire have long mystified scientists. What was the purpose behind the vast water system? 25 years of war and killing fields isolated Angkor from the outside world. Archaeologists are turning to a technological breakthrough to solve the mysteries of the ancients. Astonishing views from the space shuttle high tech radar are giving scientists a revolutionary new look at Angkor and changing old ideas about the mysterious temples. Who where the Khmer? How did they eek a living out of this harsh realm. How did they manage to create a city of such splendor and scale.

Great Museums A World of Art The Metropolitan Museum of Art

What makes a masterpiece? In this visually stunning high definition productionA World of Art, the magnificence of America’s premier art museum lights up the screen. One of the architectural glories of New York, the Met stretches 1000 feet along Fifth Avenue. Inside is a dazzling three dimensional encyclopedia of world art, radiating 5,000 years of artistic history. Founded in 1870, the Metropolitan Museum of Art was built on the shoulders of capitalism J.P. Morgan, Havemeyer, Lehman, Rockefeller, and Annenberg are just a few of the names behind the Met’s collections. Met is the largest art museum in the United States with among the most significant art collections. Its permanent collection contains more than two million works, divided among nineteen curatorial departments. The main building, located on the eastern edge of Central Park along Manhattan’s Museum Mile, is by area one of the world’s largest art galleries. Represented in the permanent collection are works of art from classical antiquity and Ancient Egypt, paintings and sculptures from nearly all the European masters, and an extensive collection of American and modern art. The Met also maintains extensive holdings of African, Asian, Oceanic, Byzantine, and Islamic art. The museum is also home to encyclopedic collections of musical instruments, costumes and accessories, and antique weapons and armor from around the world. Several notable interiors, ranging from 1st century Rome through modern American design, are permanently installed in the Met’s galleries.

Hitler's Children Education

Never has a generation been so completely taken over by a totalitarian state as it was the case in Hitler’s Third Reich at the age of 10 children joined the Jungvolk movementat 14 they joined the Hitler Youth, and at 18 they joined the party, the Wehrmacht, the SA, or the SS. This 5 part documentary by Guido Knopp and the ZDF Contemporary History Department is the first comprehensive film portrayal of the young people in the Third Reich.

In Search of Shakespeare Episode 3 The Duty of Poets

In Search of Shakespeare is a four part series exploring the life of the world’s greatest and most famous writer. It takes the form of a detective storya documentary search, and a journey not the style of historical TV shows that use re-enactments and tableaux. There is no one dressed up as Will Shakespeare or Queen Elizabeth! Instead the Royal Shakespeare Company gives a group of Britain’s best young actors and actresses the chance to go on tje road and play in the places where his company played. Shot documentary style, on and off stage, the successors of Shakespeare’s company give us a magical glimpse into how it was done playing scenes from all Shakespeare’s great shows in Tudor Guildhalls, Royal Palaces like Hampton Court, and even in broad daylight. But the core of the series is a biography. The story of one Elizabethan, his life, family and friendships, his triumphs and disasters, his loves and his losses. Episode 3 The Duty of Poets – In Episode Three of his historical detective story Michael Wood uncovers Shakespeare’s rise to fame and fortune in Elizabethan London, and the disasters in life and love which marked his path to greatness.

Lost Worlds Knights Templar

Dig into the sands of time with this exploration into lost civilizations. Scientistsarchaeologists, and historians alike search for evidence of cities that may have forever been lost to time. Some are ancient while some are surprisingly recent. Extensive archaeological research and cutting edge visual technology come together in this series that aims to bring ancient cultures and civilizations to new life on screen. pisode 1 Knights Templar – They defended the Holy Land through bloodshed and prayer. Founded in the 12th century, these Christian warrior monks reigned supreme for nearly 200 years before suffering a spectacular fall from grace. Branded heretics, they were disbanded and their Grand Master was burned at the stake Lost Worlds probes behind the legend for the lost world of the Knights Templar. Walk the streets of the city they knew as Tortosa now hidden among modern homes in the Syrian city of Tartus. Visit the site of their Jerusalem headquarters in the Temple Mount, where underground vaults were said to stable 1,000 horses. Experts recreate their mysterious initiation rites in a London church modeled on the Templar’s long-demolished home, and the tale of the Templar’s last stand is told on the Mediterranean island where they met their end.

Mysteries of Asia Jewels In The Jungle

Mysteries of Asiaproduced for The Learning Channel, explores historical fact and theory surrounding some of the oldest structures in Asia. New footage of the areas under examination is complemented by film clips and animated maps, narrated by Michael Bell. Episode Jewels in the Jungle – The ancient Khmer temples of Cambodia, much of whose history is undocumented. This program examines the unusual mix of Hindu and Buddhist religious figures among the temples and gates built by the Khmer, and examines the walled city of Angkor in some detail. Cambodia’s bloody recent history under Pol Pot is also discussed, and the program celebrates the survival of the ancient dances of Angkor, the only remaining cultural link to the distant past.

Planet of the Apemen: Battle for Earth Episode 2 Neanderthal

Homo sapienspopulated the Earth only because we were successful in overwhelming two more advanced species: Homo erectus and Homo neanderthalensis, known today as Neanderthals. In the not too distant past, humans shared this planet with other species of hominid. This series tells how, against all the odds, Homo sapiens survived. Episode 2 Neanderthal – This episode is set 35,000 years ago. As the ice caps retreated, the Neanderthal stronghold in Europe weakened, providing a window of opportunity to which modern humans owe their existence. As almost exclusively carnivorous, both male and female Neanderthals hunted. Evidence of a huge number of injuries, like those seen in today’s rodeo riders, suggest that hunting involved dangerously close contact with large prey animals.

Secrets of Egypt Episode 2 The Scorpion King

Series on Ancient Egypt. Scorpion King – The Scorpion King was a mythical Egyptian ruler who predated the pharaohs. Recent developmentssuch as the excavation of the king’s tomb, have revealed surprising new details about early Egyptian civilization.

Tattoo Hunter Crocodile Scarification of Papua New Guinea

Tattoo hunter Lars Krutak takes a trip into a remote village in the Sepik Province of Papua New Guinea in hope of becoming the first ever foreigner to take part in a traditional skin cutting ceremony which resembles the skin of a Pukpuk (Crocodile). Produced and directed by Kim MacQuarrie.

The Map Makers Discovery: The Waldseemuller Map

A map is more than a geographical representation of a land. It is an image which mirrors a society’s political religious and cultural vision of itself. The Map Makers tells the story of maps through history and explores major developments in map making. Episode 1 Discovery: The the Waldseemuller Map (1507) – A ten million dollar map which has become known as the birth certificate of America. Within the lines marked on its surface can be traced the first discoveries of the new world”by sixteenth century explorers such as Columbus and Amerigo Vespucci. But why were the new lands called America, and who were the men who first named the new continent on the famous Waldseemuller map?

The Secret Bible Episode 3 Apocalypse

A team of scientists joins forces with religious scholars to take a look at biblical tales of murdermiracles and mystery. The Bible is a repository for tales of miracles and divine interventions. But did any of the miraculous events described in this sacred book really happen as recorded? This remarkable series examines the great biblical stories and the passionate quests to understand them. This is the National Geographic Series. The Apocalypse – Is the Apocalypse at hand? Millions of Americans believe so, including scientists and members of Congress. Using the latest science, we examine the biblical prophecies of doom.

UFO Files Episode 2 When UFOs Arrive

The program covered the phenomena of unidentified flying and submerged objectsclose encounters with alleged extraterrestrial life, and alleged military and government cover up conspiracies. Episode 2 When UFOs Arrive – It’s all hush-hush as we track a secretive global paper trail, delving into government plans on how to deal with other-planet visitors. Searching historical records, we find that protocols are in place from the U.S. military’s JANAP – 146 reporting requirements to France’s Cometa files, from Chapter 13 of the FEMA Fire Officer’s Guide to Disaster Control titled Enemy Attack and UFO Potential to a now repealed federal law titled “Extraterrestrial Exposure”.

What the Stuarts Did For Us Episode 3 The Organysed Isle

The series explores scientific inventions and discoveries made during the Stuart period from 1603 to 1714 and their implications even today. Episodes are grouped based on themes architecture and lifestyleengineering and sciences, economics and politics, and discoveries with influence in science fiction. Episode 3 The Organysed Isle – Britain becomes more organised under the Stuart dynasty. Moll Cutpurse was the world’s first highway(wo)man, preying on new lines of communication opened by travel by coach. This period sees the inception of public transport, street lighting, the fire brigade, the creation of Great Britain, the first banknotes, government bonds, and the Bank of England.

World War II In Colour Episode 13 Victory in the Pacific

World War II In HD Colour is a 13 episode television documentary series recounting the major events of World War II narrated by Robert Powell. The series combines both original and colourised footage. With the very latest satellite delivered terrain mapping and state of the art graphics this story can now be told with access to information which was not previously available to other older series. Conventional wisdom has recently changed as more and more secrets have been revealed particularly in the last five to ten years as documentsfiles and photographs have been released. Code breaking revelations, and newly released government papers on both sides of the Atlantic have added a very insightful new dimension to the understanding of this the worlds’ greatest ever conflict. Episode 13 Victory in the Pacific – As the Americans face the decision of what to do with mainland Japan, President Truman calls to bomb Hiroshima and Nagasaki with nuclear weapons. Japan had no choice but to surrender and the Cold War begins. The Japanese fought to the bitter end and continued to fight island by island, hill by hill. US Air Force command tried bombing Japan into submission, firebombing Tokyo but could not break the Japanese resolve.

Derek Tastes of Earwax Synaesthesia

This documentary looks at the fact that perhaps one in every hundred people experiences a blending of the senses. Imagine if every time you saw someone called Derek you got a strong taste of earwax in your mouth. It happens to James Wannertonwho runs a pub. Derek is one of his regulars. Another regular’s name gives him the taste of wet nappies. For some puzzling reason, James’s sense of sound and taste are intermingled. He has a mysterious condition called synaesthesia, in which this senses have become linked. For decades synaesthesia baffled the scientific community and noone could quite believe it was real. Some put it down to an overactive imagination others thought it was caused by associations from childhood that had survived into later life. In the end noone could find out what was causing it, so synaesthesia was placed in the same scientific category as seances and spoon bending. But Professor Ramachandran thought it should be taken more seriously.

Inside the Mind of Adolf Hitler

A Documentarywith dramatised elements, looking at the psychological profile of Adolf Hitler compiled by a team of Harvard psychologists in 1943. Interviewing former colleagues and the former family doctor who had fled to the USA and using Freudian techniques and theories of the day they came up with a profile and predicted how he would react to certain situations, concluding that he would not surrender and would be most likely to commit suicide when faced with defeat. This led to future profiling of many world leaders and dictators.

Scotland on Screen

Scottish movie star Alan Cumming returns to his homeland to take a tour of the locations of some classic Scottish movies. He celebrates some of the weird and wonderful movies inspired by Scotland such as The Wicker Man, which was filmed in Dumfries and Galloway. Film experts and actors, including Peter Mullen and David Hayman, compare the blockbusters Braveheart and Rob Roy, while Edinburgh’s contribution to Scottish cinema is celebrated by the contrasting films The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie and Trainspotting. Director Bill Forsyth meets Cumming in Cumbernauld – the setting of Forsyth’s film Gregory’s Girl – and explains why the new town was such a fitting location for his enduringly popular film.

The Holy Grail

Searching for traces of a mysterious age. Could a sword with magical powers really have existed? Was there really a camelot? Who was King Arthur and the knights of the round table? Where was the legendary grail castle located? The first step in the journey for the holy grail brings us into the mysterious world of the celts. They came to europe from the east. With them they brought their culture rituals and tradition of burying a prince with his belongings as a gift to the gods. The celts believed in resurrection of the dead. A relief on a bronze vessel from the 1st century B.C. shows a prince placing dead warriors into huge drinking vessels to bring them back to life. This documentary argues the celtic magic vessel as the origin of the medieval holy grail story.

Waffen SS Hitlers Elite Fighting Force

As the Nazi Reich staggers toward final extinction desperate resistance continues amidst the rubble of Berlin. Hitler had sent his armies marching and ravaging over a continent and beyond. Throughout all that vast sphere of conflict there was one band of fighting men who were everywhere known. In their brief but extraordinary existence they won a unique reputation for daring elan and unfailing professionalism in combat. Yet if their courage was beyond disputeso too was the fear and loathing which they elicited, even eventually among their own people, and in the regular soldiers alongside whom they fought. In the long period of decline and retreat, despite repeatedly sustaining appalling casualties their discipline remained unbroken, their fighting ardour unimpaired, almost to the very end, and for all their high undoubted bravery they bear a reputation forever shrouded with infamy.

Ancient Inventions War And Conflicts

Join Monty Python’s Terry Jones on a tour of the ingenuity of our ancestors. Take a humorous yet factual look at inventions we think of as unique to modern times when really they have been around for centuries and many even longer. Some of the amazing discoveries include: automatic doorsfirst designed over 2000 years ago, accurate pregnancy tests, a regular feature of ancient Babylon, and tanks, actually devised by the Assyrians in 8 B.C. Clearly the ancient world was every bit as inventive as our own. Episode War and Conflict – Julius Caesar never used a mobile phone, Socrates never consulted a digital watch, and Alexander the Great never flushed the lavatory. But that doesn’t mean they were stupid. Archeologists tell us the human brain is the same size now as it was 60,000 years ago, and our ancestors were every bit as intelligent as we are today, so we shouldn’t assume that the scientists and inventors of the past have nothing to teach us. In fact, when it comes to weapon’s technology none of it is as new as we think it is. Guided missiles, flame throwers, chemical weapons, tanks, even the theory of the atom bomb, they’re all ancient inventions.

Bible Mysteries The Real Mary Magdalene

Bible Mysteries is a series of programs exploring great figures and events from biblical times. Historicalarchaeological and anthropological evidence combined with stylish drama re-enactments, CGI graphics and expert opinion offers a comprehensive exploration into some of the Bible’s most compelling people and stories and gives fresh insights into the historical realities of the times. Episode The Real Mary Magdalene – Mary Magdalene’s story is intimately linked with Jesus. She plays a starring role in one of the most powerful and important scenes in the Gospels. When Jesus is crucified by the Romans, Mary Magdalene was there supporting him in his final terrifying moments and mourning his death. She also discovers the empty tomb, and she’s a witness to the resurrection. She was there at the beginning of a movement that was going to transform the West. But the Mary Magdalene that lives in our memories is quite different. In art, she’s often semi naked, or an isolated hermit repenting for her sins in the wilderness an outcast.

Cities of the Underworld Catacombs of Death

Get to the bottom of the world’s great cities – literally! Sink into subterranean discovery lead by intrepid explorers Eric Geller and Don Wildman. With each step below street level you travel back decadeseven centuries, into the fascinating past of the world’s great cities. What mysteries await discovery in the dark corners of these subterranean realms? This is the stuff of fantasy exploring secret chambers and forbidden passages beneath city streets, unlocking mysteries of the past and discovering forgotten relics. Episode 5 Catacombs of Death, Paris, France – Many call Paris the most beautiful city in the world, but its past is one of the bloodiest and most macabre in history. While the dead tell no tales, Eric Geller has a lot to say about their hidden underground realm. And a lot to discover as he explores the eerie, millennia-old secret tunnels and crypts below the streets of Paris.

Earth The Power of the Planet Episode 2 Atmosphere

Earth: The Power of the Planet highlights the major events which have shaped the Earth’s history and allowed life to flourish. Presented by Dr Iain Stewarteach episode will reveal a different force critical to the development of Earth including volcanoes, the ocean, the atmosphere and ice. Episode 2 Atmosphere-The atmosphere is Earth’s protective layer, cloaking us in a warm, oxygen-rich embrace and shielding us from the cold hostility of space. It acts as a natural greenhouse, keeping the Earth 51 degrees Fahrenheit warmer than it would otherwise be. Yet the atmosphere is also full of contradictions. It’s immensely powerful but at the same time highly sensitive. It’s destructive, yet it shelters us. It was created in part by the planet’s first organisms, and it continues to be essential for life.

Great Museums Riches Rivals and Radicals 100 Years of Museums in America

American is a land of museums. America’s museum offer solitudesanctuary and discovery. They reflect who we were, who we are, and who we hope to be. Visit some of America’s museums coast-to-coast. Meet the characters whose fervor fueled the revolution that changed America’s museums. Narrated by Susan Stamberg. Discover the commanding and charismatic characters whose fervor fueled the 20th-century revolution that changed America’s museums from dusty and elitist to dynamic and democratic! This landmark public television special features museum stories coast-to-coast. Riches, Rivals, and Radicals is hosted by award-winning national correspondent Susan Stamberg, who has covered the world of museums and the arts throughout her broadcasting career.

Hitler's Henchmen and Warriors Rommel The Hero

Hitler’s Henchmen and Hitler’s Warriors paints portraits of the men who consolidated Hitler’s reign and turned his plans into action. They wove the complicities and plots without which Hitler could have never perpetrated the crime of the century. They helped to sway the judges and the bureaucratsthe armed forces and the police, the scientists and the industrialists, the students and their teachers to the regime’s ways of thinking. What kind of people were they? What inspired them to serve a corrupt administration with such enthusiasm and devotion? How did their careers unfold and their fates end? These documentaries by Guiddo Knopp and ZDF looks at the high ranking officers who aided the dictator in his war of aggression and managers who turned his plans into reality.

Inside the Medieval Mind Episode 4 Power

One of the world’s greatest authorities on the Middle AgesProfessor Robert Bartlett of St Andrew’s University, investigates the intellectual landscape of the medieval world. Power – Professor Bartlett lays bare the brutal framework of the medieval class system. Inequality was a part of the natural order the life of serfs was little better than those of animals, while the knight’s code of chivalry was based more on caste solidarity than morality. The class you were born into determined who you were.

Medieval Season Stephen Fry and The Machine That Made Us

The Gutenberg Press was perhaps the most revolutionary machine ever invented. Stephen Fry discovers the lengths to which Gutenberg went to keep his project secret then helps to build a working model of the press and explores how print democratised knowledge by making the written word accessible to all. Stephen Fry investigates the story of one of the most important machines ever invented – the Gutenberg Press.

Revealed Hitler’s Private World

When Adolf Hitler bought Eva Braun a movie camerato film the people and parties which occurred at their expansive and heavily guarded Bavarian retreat, the technology to include synchronized sound had not yet been developed. So when soldiers discovered Hitler’s private home movies, in the Berlin bunker where the Nazi leader took his own life, the tantalizing clips they unearthed, featuring leading members of the SS in a more relaxed mode, remained silent for over 60 years. Now, leading edge lip reading software has enabled German experts to re-voice these films and provide us with a chilling insight into Hitlers private world.

Secrets Of The Dead Lost Ships of Rome

In 2009a team of marine archaeologists carrying out a sonar survey of the seabed around the Italian island of Ventotene made an astonishing discovery. The wrecks of five ancient Roman ships were found in pristine condition. Remarkably, much of the cargo remained exactly as the ancient Roman crews had loaded it. What happened to these ancient ships? What were they carrying and why had they traveled to this remote, rocky island in the first place? Lost Ships of Rome follows the team as they explore the sites in detail, salvage artifacts and piece together the history of the ships and why they were lost at Ventotene two thousand years ago.

The Adventure of English Episode 1 Birth of a Language

The life story of a remarkable language. Melvyn Bragg and a host of experts explore the vibrant 1,500 year history of the English language. How did it grow from a relatively insignificant Germanic dialect to become the premier language of culture, commerce, and diplomacy around the globe? The answer involves bloody conquest, political intrigue, and plenty of creativity. Episode 1 Birth of a Language – The modern Frisian language is the closest sounding language to the English used approximately 2000 years ago, when the people from what is now the north of the Netherlands travelled to what would become England, and pushed the Celtic language, ancestor of modern Welsh, to the western side of the island. Words like blue can be recognised in the Frisian language. Bragg then discusses how English dialects in certain areas of the United Kingdom were heavily influenced by historical events such as the invasion of the Vikings in the east contributing words such as “sky” to the English language.

The Monarchy Episode 5 The Kingdom United

This fascinating six program series takes a searching look at the public and private lives of the British Royal Family. The six programs offer a revealing insight into the world’s most famous familylooking at how the monarchy works, how it has evolved over the centuries and the challenges it faces in the present and in the future. The Kingdom United – Every year the Queen spends a week at Holyrood House, Edinburgh and holds a garden party. Whilst in Scotland her honor guard is provided by the royal company of archers, amateur soldiers drawn from the local gentry. The Queen’s presence in Scotland is a very significant part of her role for the Queen is the head of a United Kingdom of diverse nations, each with their own culture. The monarchy in many ways has been the cement that binds the union together.

The Tower Treasure

A three part series from the Discovery civilization channelall about the Tower of London. This is the story of the tower of London, past and present. With unique access to the tower, this series will unlock its private, as well as public life. Revealing the hidden history of well known stories, and uncovering forgotten tower secrets. More than anywhere else in Britain these building have stood at the heart of history for over 900 years. The truth of what happened here is still being discovered. From executions with block and axe, to spies shot in the first world war, it has prisoners as familiar is queen Elizabeth the first, and as recent as World War Two u-boat men. Episode 1 Fortress With unique access behind the walls and locked doors of the Tower of London, discover how it stayed at the cutting edge of military technology.

Walking With Beasts Episode 3 Land of Giants

Walking With Beasts is an introduction to the animals (predominantly mammals) that roamed the earth from the extinction of the dinosaurs until the rise of early humans the Cenozoic period. It uses a combination of clever special effects and computer-generated imagery to create a realistic world as it may have appeared millions of years ago. Some of the concepts it illustrates are the evolution of whales, horses, and humans. Episode 3 Land of Giants – Goe back 25 million years to meet the biggest land mammals of all time – the Indricotheres. Up to 7 metres tall and weighing 15 tonnes. This programme follows the fate of a calf from birth to droughts, six foot tall killer hogs and Hyaenodon, a predator the size of a rhino, with jaws that could crush a rock.

Wild Russia Primeval Valleys (Urals)

Wild Russia is a landmark High Definition series charting a journey across this vast land that stretches from Europe to the Pacific Ocean. Covering 11 time zones this huge country contains a wealth of unspoilt natural wildernesses beyond the huge cities of Moscow and St. Petersburg, a primal world with rough mountain summits, wild rivers and an unmatched flora and fauna reveals itself. Primeval Valleys – Travel through the majestic primeval forests of the Urals, a sanctuary where giant deer, half tonne leviathans and tiny adventures flourish.

Ancient Graves Voices of the Dead

Through the lens of modern science the grave has become a window on the past. Today we can learn intimate detail about how the ancients lived and how they died. Bit by bit their portraits emerge from flesh bones and DNA. The unearthing of the past reveals the tangled roots ofvour family tree. But some see only the desecration of our ancestors. Through this documentary listen to the voices of the dead. Ancient human grave sites speak volumes to those who listen. These haunting human time capsules have been uncovered all over the world. Some even reach a certain level of fameThe Ampato maiden sacrificed on an Andes peak. The Alpine Ice Man, the oldest frozen mummy ever found. England’s 9,000 year old Cheddar Man. Others’ stories are known only to the ages, like a cache of elaborately adorned 7,000 year old mummies unearthed in Chile, and the thousands of Egyptian mummies actually burned as train fuel in the 19th century. Modern science now allows us to explore these human treasures without destroying them, and connects us all to the secrets of the ancient dead.

Executioner Pierrepoint

Executioner Pierrepoint reveals for the first time ever on TV the exact number of people Albert executed and talks of a previously unknown visit to the grave of Ruth Ellis who he hanged in 1955 for the murder of her boyfriend. Just what was going through his mind after so many years in this macabre profession?

Lost King of the Maya

Sixteen hundred years agoa mysterious left-handed warrior seized control of the Mayan city of Copan, founding a dynasty that would last for 400 years. Eventually the Maya abandoned Copan and all other Mayan cities, which lay undisturbed for over 1,000 years. Then, in the 19th century, explorers John Lloyd Stephens and Frederick Catherwood stumbled on the vine strangled remains of huge complexes of temples and monuments covered with strange portraits and hieroglyphs. This documentary takes viewers deep into the Central American rain forest to the resurrected ruins of Copan, a once majestic jewel of Mayan civilization which was inexplicably abandoned over a thousand years ago.

Thatcher and the Scots

Allan Little looks back at the tumultuous Thatcher years and assesses the effect they had on Scotland. The programme also examines the personalhuman relationship between Margaret Thatcher and Scotland. Why did she become the subject of so much bile? And what does that say about the Scots and their attitudes? With archive film and in-depth interviews with politicians, historians and those who lived through and reported on the Thatcher years.

The Poet Who Loved the War Ivor Gurney

A charismatic original Ivor Gurney, who prior to the Great War had suffered a nervous breakdown at the Royal College of Music, enlisted as an experiment, he actually found the war invigorating and for a while his mental health improved. Unlike the other war poets Gurney wasn’t a commissioned officer, he was an ordinary front line soldier. A private. The poetry he wrote there is uniquely powerful, capturing the experience of the ordinary soldier, and the this documentary argues that it is the equal of the work of any of the more well known soldier poets of WWI.

Ancient Rome The Rise and Fall of an Empire Episode 5 Constantine

This is the 6 episode BBC docudrama with voiceovernot the 13 episode History channel documentary with recreations. The rise and fall of Ancient Rome through six key turning points. Factually accurate and based on extensive historical research, it reveals how the greed, lust and ambition of men like Caesar, Nero and Constantine shaped the Roman Empire. CGI is mixed with compelling drama and spectacular live-action battles. Episode 5 Constantine – In Rome the tyrannical Maxentius consults the gods Jupiter, Apollo and Mars to be told that, the enemy of Rome will be defeated. After seeing what appears to be a sign from the Christian god on the eve of the attack, Constantine adopts a Christian symbol. Constantine defeats his opponent at the Battle of Chrysopolis and the empire is united under one Christian god at the Council of Nicea.

Building the Impossible: Seven Wonders of the Ancient World Episode 1 Artemis Mausoleum and Zeus

They were built by the ancients in the time before Christ to a scale that is unbelievable. They dared their creators to push engineering to new heights which still astound us today. Architecture and sculpture continue to stand in the shadow of their genius. Now by revealing the secrets of the past we can unlock the mysteries of their construction which earn them the highest distinction as the seven wonders of the ancient world. Episode 1 ArtemisMausoleum and Zeus – Temple of Artemis at Ephesus – The first cranes were used to construct the world’s largest marble temple. It was supported by a forest of fluted columns, 60 feet high. How were the ancients able to achieve such detail while working on an such enormous scale? Mausoleum at Halicarnassus – The most extraordinary building every constructed, it stood the height of a 14 story building, and was covered with statues it has left the word mausoleum. Its style has been copied all over the world from Washington D.C. to the shrine of remembrance in Melbourne, Australia. Statue of Zeus at Olympia – The sculpture who created it used a secret recipe to shape the ivory. But how did he achieve such realism? The originality of it’s design has inspired artists and sculptors to copy it throughout the centuries.

Egypt Beyond the Pyramids Episode 4 Death and The Journey To Immortality

This four part series takes the viewer into the heart of Egypt to sites never before seen on film. Included are the first ever filmed looks at legendary sites such as the Tomb of Ramses IIthe Abydos Boat Graves, and the skeletons at Mendes. State of the art archaeological equipment and cutting edge computer technology are employed to offer a deeper, fuller analysis of artifacts and sites, thereby creating a greater understanding of the lives and civilization of the Ancient Egyptians. Host Peter Woodward. Episode 4 Death and the Journey to Immortality – An accidental discovery in 1996 leads to a clearer understanding of the burial rituals of the ancient world. Egyptian civilization was based on the hope of eternal life after death. This episode explores some of the ancient places that reveal the secrets of the religion and study the sacred tomb hieroglyphs in the Valley of the Kings. At the cemetery of the pyramid builders in Giza and the Valley of the Golden Mummies in the Bahariyya Oasis, viewers learn more about Egyptian burial practices and methods. Drs. Zahi Hawass and Salima Ikram seek to unravel the secrets of mummification.

High Society Hitler’s Favourite Royal

Hitler’s Favourite Royal covers the life of Prince Charles EdwardQueen Victoria’s youngest grandchild, who was forced by his Grandmother to take up the Dukedom of Coburg in Germany after a series of unexpected deaths of uncles and cousins. With the advent of World War One, he reluctantly fought for the German army but refused to fight the British. However, once the war was over, he was stripped of his English titles. Disillusioned, he turned to far right politics and became an enthusiastic early supporter of the emergent Nazi Party and unwittingly helped in Hitler’s rise to power.

Legacy Origins of Civilization Episode 2 India Empire Of Spirit

As the world approaches the 21st centurythis new series hosted by Michael Woods and produced in 1991, reminds us that other nations and cultures prospered for hundreds or even thousands of years. Now all that remains is the legacy of their civilizations, present and influential in our own. Shot on location on four continents, Legacy takes a different viewpoint from other series that concentrate primarily on the the Western view of history. Visiting China, India, Egypt, the Middle East, Greece and Meso-America, this series traces the rise of both Asian and western civilization. India The Empire of the Spirit – Ancient India is with us today in the living tradition of the Hindu religion, the basis of Indian culture. The traditions that are honored by millions of Hindus in the present were born in the Indus valley 5,000 years ago.