What the Romans Did For Us Episode 4 Arteries of the Empire

This is where it all began, Adam Hart-Davis first foray, directly inspired by the Monty Python sequence from “The Life of Brian”, where the People’s Front of Judea discuss “What have the Romans done for us?”, into how the foundations of modern society were laid by the surprising cultural and technological achievements of the Roman empires. This is the first series of “What The … Did For Us” hosted by Adam Hart-Davis. Episode 4 Arteries of the Empire – Hart-Davis analyses the Romans’ ingenious surveying methods that enabled them to build their arrow-straight roads. Groma surveying, demonstrated by Hart-Davis, allowed the surveying of perfectly straight roads such as Watling Street and Stane Street. The construction of Roman roads, demonstrated by Hart Davis, has allowed them to endure to this day. He also commissions a replica of an ingenious giant water wheel used to remove water from flooded Welsh gold mines. The remains of a Roman fortification dating back to their first century landing, as well as a museum of Roman life.

Barbarians Series 1 and 2 The Huns

They were the dreaded forces on the fringes of civilization, the bloodthirsty warriors who defied the Roman legions and terrorized the people of Europe. They were the Barbarians, and their names still evoke images of cruelty and chaos. But what do we really know of these legendary warriors? From the frigid North Sea to the Russian steppes, this ambitious series tells the fascinating stories of the most fabled groups of fighters in history, tracing 1,000 years of conquest and adventure through inspired scholarship and some of the most extensive reenactments ever filmed. Huns Huns probes the truth behind the mysterious warriors who were led by man whose name remains synonymous with bloodshed and destruction Attila.

Legacy Origins of Civilization Episode 6 The Barbarian West

As the world approaches the 21st century, this new series hosted by Michael Woods and produced in 1991, reminds us that other nations and cultures prospered for hundreds or even thousands of years. Now all that remains is the legacy of their civilizations, present and influential in our own. Shot on location on four continents, Legacy takes a different viewpoint from other series that concentrate primarily on the the Western view of history. Visiting China, India, Egypt, the Middle East, Greece and Meso-America, this series traces the rise of both Asian and western civilization The Barbarian West – Civilization arose in Asia, but it was the West which would create the first world culture. This final episode traces the origins of western culture through Greece and Rome prevailing by borrowing from the legacies of the original five old world civilizations.

Terry Jones' Barbarians The End of The World

Monty Python’s Terry Jones invites you on an entertaining expedition through Roman history from an entirely different perspective – that of the Barbarians. Far from the uncivilized savages they have been believed to be, many of these non-Romans were not barbaric at all. They were, in fact, highly organized and intelligent societies that had no intentions of overthrowing Rome or its Empire. The End of The World – Around 400 AD, two Barbarian babies were born. One would grow up to become the most feared of all – Attila the Hun. The other, Geiseric, led the Vandals whom history has cast as destroyers. Jones finds out that Roman civilization wasn’t destroyed by the invasion of these tribes, but by the loss of the North African tax base. He sees the common view of Rome and “Barbarians” as a result of the Roman Catholic Church popularizing the Roman version of the truth.

The Trial of Jesus

What is known about the trial and execution of Jesus? Despite the familiar gospel stories of the new testament, much of the historical account remains a mystery. What most historians can agree on is this: around the year 30 of the first century, a Jewish man named Jesus, leaves his home in the Galilea and does something in the Jewish temple that causes him to be arrested. Then the occupying Roman authorities execute him by crucifixion. Beyond that crucial facts remain unclear. Why is he arrested? What charges are brought against him and by whom, and why is he given the cruelest of punishments, death by crucifixion? Eminent scholars sift through Roman, Jewish and early Christian documents searching for answers.

Byzantium Episode 2 Heaven on Earth

For more than 1,000 years, the Byzantine Empire was the eye of the entire world – the origin of great literature, fine art and modern government. Heir to Greece and Rome, it was the first Christian empire, spanning 11 centuries and three continents. In the end, plundered and sacked by invaders, Byzantium nearly became extinct. Episode 2 Heaven on Earth – You can’t have Jesus king of the world unless he looks like a king. Christians zre getting their iconography from – straight from the pagan faith. But When Christianity took over the Roman Empire, it attacked and swept away all these signs. Now these signs were as old as man himself, and Christianity was pretty poorly supplied with alternatives. After all, it was a language of books and words. But unless it was to fail, it had to develop and develop quickly a whole new set of images for the world.

Rome Power & Glory Episode 4 Grasp of an Empire

For over a thousand years, Rome was the center of the known world. One of the most glorious empires in history, she brought to her subjects a common language, shared culture, and for some wealth beyond imagination. But nothing lasts forever. War, barbarian attacks, and moral decay eventually took their toll and the empire slowly began to crumble. This six part series presents the complete history of Rome, from its primitive beginnings, to the height of its glory to its eventual decline, as well as its legacies today. Episode 4 The Grasp of the Empire – How the Romans controlled their vast empire through an alliance of slaves and peasants a system that led to the longest sustained period of peace in their history

The Roman Empire in the First Century Episode 1 Order from Chaos

Two thousand years ago, at the dawn of the first century, the world was ruled by Rome. Using the experiences, memories and writings of the people who lived through this remarkable age, The Roman Empire in the First Century A.D. brings to life the greatest empire the world has ever known. The program uses diaries, poems, private letters and public records to tell the stories of emperors and slaves, poets and plebeians who built the most sophisticated society the world had ever seen. Episode 1 Order from Chaos – Born to an unremarkable family, Augustus got a lucky break when his great uncle, Julius Caesar, adopted him. When Caesar was murdered shortly afterwards, Augustus threw himself into the murderous mix of Roman politics.

Ancient Rome The Rise and Fall of an Empire Episode 2 Nero

This is the 6 episode BBC docudrama with voiceover, not the 13 episode History channel documentary with recreations. The rise and fall of Ancient Rome through six key turning points. Factually accurate and based on extensive historical research, it reveals how the greed, lust and ambition of men like Caesar, Nero and Constantine shaped the Roman Empire. CGI is mixed with compelling drama and spectacular live-action battles. Episode 2 Nero – His plans to turn Rome into a glorious city bankrupted the Empire, he married his slaveboy and he was finally overthrown. This is the story of what happened when the most powerful man on Earth lost his mind and brought the Empire to the brink of destruction.

Decisive Battles of the Ancient World Attila the Hun 451 A.D. Battle of Chalon

Decisive Battles of the Ancient World presents the 13 defining points of ancient warfare moments that altered the course of history and shaped the modern world. It is a comprehensive account of the famed leaders that commanded victory and the brilliant military tactics that swayed destiny. The show used the game engine from Rome: Total War to present 3-D versions of the battles. Attila the Hun 451 A.D. Battle of Chalon – No ruler in history represents the barbarian brutality as much as Attila the Hun, who swept through 5th-century Europe and emerged holding its future in his grasp.

Rome Rise and Fall of an Empire Episode 9 The Soldiers Emperor

It is 114 B.C. and the Republic of Rome is a small empire clinging to the rim of the Mediterranean. Suddenly, terror grips the Romans as the first barbarian attack smashes through the imperial boarder, paving the way for what would become one of the most tumultuous eras in the history of mankind. Filled with dramatic re-enactments and action packed battle scenes, Rome Rise and Fall of an Empire chronicles the dramatic story of one of history’s greatest empires from its first major battle to its remarkable military feats and through its eventual fall. This is the History Channel series, not BBC. The Soldiers’ Emperor – Near the end of the third century, civil war has torn the empire apart and left its borders vulnerable to barbarian invasion. Romans living on the eastern and western frontiers, far from Rome, are left to defend themselves, which they do by building their own armies and naming their own emperors. As the Empire divides against itself, one extraordinary man rises from the rank of soldier to become emperor in Rome. His name is Aurelian, and with an unshakeable trust in the sun god, he fights back the barbarians who by now threaten Rome itself.

What the Romans Did For Us Episode 5 Edge of Empire

This is where it all began, Adam Hart-Davis first foray, directly inspired by the Monty Python sequence from “The Life of Brian”, where the People’s Front of Judea discuss “What have the Romans done for us?”, into how the foundations of modern society were laid by the surprising cultural and technological achievements of the Roman empires. This is the first series of “What The … Did For Us” hosted by Adam Hart-Davis. Episode 5 Edge of Empire – Hart-Davis visits Hadrian’s Wall and demonstrates how communications were the key to the success of the Roman military machine. Hadrian’s Wall marked the northern boundary of the Roman Empire, and had defensive features such as milecastles and forts such as Housesteads. At supply depots such as Arbeia, Romans baked bread in open fires. The remains of a Roman fort and settlement, with full-scale reconstructed buildings and an excellent museum. Excavations are in progress. Many documents have been discovered at Vindolanda fort, such as postcards made out of thin wood veneer.

Barbarians Series 1 and 2 The Lombards

They were the dreaded forces on the fringes of civilization, the bloodthirsty warriors who defied the Roman legions and terrorized the people of Europe. They were the Barbarians, and their names still evoke images of cruelty and chaos. But what do we really know of these legendary warriors? From the frigid North Sea to the Russian steppes, this ambitious series tells the fascinating stories of the most fabled groups of fighters in history, tracing 1,000 years of conquest and adventure through inspired scholarship and some of the most extensive reenactments ever filmed. Lombards The ferocious tribe partial to severing their foes’ heads and stealing their women. Their brutal leader, Alboin, overcame Roman defenses, surrounded The Eternal City, and forced a captured foe’s wife to drink from her slain father’s skull.

Lost Worlds The First Christians

Dig into the sands of time with this exploration into lost civilizations. Scientists, archaeologists, and historians alike search for evidence of cities that may have forever been lost to time. Some are ancient while some are surprisingly recent. Extensive archaeological research and cutting edge visual technology come together in this series that aims to bring ancient cultures and civilizations to new life on screen. Episode 3 The First Christians – In the aftermath of Jesus’ crucifixion, only a hundred or so of his followers survived. But within a few decades, Christianity had spread around the Mediterranean and across the Roman Empire. This episode draws on the expertise of a team of field investigators using the latest research, expert analysis, and cutting edge graphic technology to return to the earliest years of Christianity. From the port of Tarsus, where St. Paul was born, the program follows the systems of trade and transport that helped him travel 20,000 miles.

Terry Jones' Barbarians The Primitive Celts

Monty Python’s Terry Jones invites you on an entertaining expedition through Roman history from an entirely different perspective – that of the Barbarians. Far from the uncivilized savages they have been believed to be, many of these non-Romans were not barbaric at all. They were, in fact, highly organized and intelligent societies that had no intentions of overthrowing Rome or its Empire. The Primitive Celts – The popular view of Celtic society is that it was primitive and uncivilized. Terry Jones sets out to challenge this view. Far from being primitive compared to Rome, it was an advanced society that was in some ways even more advanced than Rome. For example, many of the roads in Gaul that were assumed to have been built by the Romans, turn out to have been built by the Celts themselves.