Legend of the Holy Spear

When Christ was crucified 2,000 years ago a Roman guard thrust a spear in his side to see if he was still alive. In that moment a central tenet of Christian faith was realised Jesus was dead, he was thus able to be resurrected. Legend of the Holy Spear follows two investigators attempting to discover if any of them could have been present at the crucifixion. Scrutinizing each spear and closely analysing the stories and legends behind them, the film reveals astonishing clues as to their provenance. Amid tight security the ancient spearhead is undergoing the latest scientific testing. Can 21st century science reveal the truth behind the many myths of the Spear of Jesus?

Nikola Tesla The Genius Who Lit the World

Nikola Tesla was born on July 10,1856 in Smiljan, Lika in what later became Yugoslavia. Tesla studied at the Polytechnic Institute in Graz, Austria and the University of Prague. While in Strassbourg in 1883, he privately built a prototype of the induction motor and ran it successfully. Unable to interest anyone in Europe in promoting this radical device Tesla accepted an offer to work for Thomas Edison in New York. Young Nikola Tesla came to the United States in 1884. Tesla will spend the next 59 years of his productive life living in New York. Electricity today is generated, transmitted and converted to mechanical power by means of his inventions. Tesla’s greatest achievement is his polyphase alternating current system, which is today lighting the entire globe.

The Secret Underworld

In 1986 a group of Romanian scientists working near the Black Sea stumbled upon one of the most amazing discoveries of this centuryone that would revolutionize our understanding of what life is and where it came from. Geologist and cave explorer, Christian Lascu, was inspecting a series of six test wells at a site where the government was planning on building a power station, the first five bore holes yielded nothing unusual and the sixth looked equally unpromising at first. The workers were inside and said they found a small hole. The geologist dug and realized there was a cave there. His task was to explore the well and insure that the limestone bedrock would support the foundations of the power station. The strong sulphurous smell at the bottom drew him on into the unknown, he reached a small sulforous lake and saw many small animals. He knew immediately this cavern was unique, where had these bizarre animals come from and how could they survive in this hostile environment deep underground?

Cities of the Underworld City of Caves Budapest

Get to the bottom of the world’s great cities, literally! Sink into subterranean discovery lead by intrepid explorers Eric Geller and Don Wildman. With each step below street level you travel back decades even centuries, into the fascinating past of the world’s great cities. What mysteries await discovery in the dark corners of these subterranean realms? This is the stuff of fantasy exploring secret chambers and forbidden passages beneath city streets, unlocking mysteries of the past and discovering forgotten relics. City of Caves Budapest – Exploring caves beneath Budapest, Hungary. Included an underground World War II hospital.

People's Century Episode 18 Picture Power 1963

A departure from other documentaries that observe history as the actions of great men People’s Century considers the Century from the view of common people. Most persons interviewed were ordinary men and women who closely witnessed various events and they give personal accounts how developments in the Twentieth Century affected their lives. The opening credits depict various images from the century and a very short introduction. Episode 18 Picture Power 1963 – Governments, advertisers and revolutionaries seek to exploit television’s ability to instantly communicate compelling messages to mass audiences. Television allows people to vividly witness Queen Elizabeth’s Coronation, the 1960 US Presidential election, the moon landing, the Munich Olympics, the Tienanmen Square Massacre, the Romanian Revolution of 1989 and the Gulf War. Advertising, education programs, and series like Ramayan, Dallas and Oshin influence society by changing perceptions and habits. The introductory scene showed the impact of television in communicating the news of the assassination of President Kennedy. Interviewees include Abu Daoud and Don Hewitt.

Gladiators of WWII Free Polish

The ultimate success or failure of many of the battles of World War II boiled down to men and machines locked in a fight to the death. Special regimentssquadrons and naval services, together with clandestine forces and formations, gave the vast, overall fighting forces of World War II an extra edge in the most pivotal battles. Gladiators of World War II examines the establishment and background of the greatest fighting forces of the Second World War. Each program examines a different unit, dissecting its command structure, military objectives, battle formations and its success or failure in applying its tactics and strategy to each of the major theatres in which it fought. Episode Free Polish Forces – The German overrunning of their country in 1939 did not crush the Polish spirit. Many escaped to the West to carry on the fight. Polish fighter pilots played a major role in the Battle of Britain, while Polish ground forces helped to liberate Western Europe. Another Polish force, held captive by the Russians in Siberia, made an epic trek to the Middle East to fought in Italy, where their courage brought a victorious end to the bitter battle for Monte Cassino.

People's Century Episode 25 People Power 1989

A departure from other documentaries that observe history as the actions of great men, People’s Century considers the Century from the view of common people. Most persons interviewed were ordinary men and women who closely witnessed various events and they give personal accounts how developments in the Twentieth Century affected their lives. The opening credits depict various images from the century and a very short introduction. Episode 25 People Power 1989 – By the 1970s the people in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe were becoming aware of the economic failures of central planning. Propaganda and an intrusive security apparatus were now needed to maintain control, particularly after the appearance of Western consumer goods and culture in the Eastern Block, and Pope John Paul II’s visit to Poland, raised public discontent with their entrenched governments. From 1985 new Soviet Premier Mikhail Gorbachev introduces reforms to encourage openness and initiative to stop stagnation. Gorbachev also allows Eastern Europe to set their own destinies. In 1989 Hungary begins dismantling the Iron Curtain and Poland holds free elections; the absence of a Soviet response encourages people in the more hard-line states of East Germany, Czechoslovakia and Romania to eventually overthrow their leaders. Gorbachev’s reforms triggers an unsuccessful coup in 1991, eventually leading to the end of the Communist Party and the dissolution of the Soviet Union. The introductory scene shows the fall of the Berlin Wall.

History's Turning Points 1914 A.D. The Shot That Started the Great War

Each turning point in history has behind it a story and a set of principal characters whose dilemmas and conflicts form its dramatic coreand whose unique personalities influenced the outcome of events. History’s Turning Points provides a fascinating and intriguing new perspective on the significant moments that have changed the world. The Shot That Started the Great War – 1914 A.D. Archduke Franz Ferdinand, the heir to the Austro – Hungarian empire arrived with his wife Sophie in the capital of Bosnia – Herzegovina, Sarajevo on June 28th 1914.

People's Century Episode 26 Fast Forward/Back to The Future 1997

A departure from other documentaries that observe history as the actions of great men, People’s Century considers the Century from the view of common people. Most persons interviewed were ordinary men and women who closely witnessed various events and they give personal accounts how developments in the Twentieth Century affected their lives. The opening credits depict various images from the century and a very short introduction. Episode 26 Fast Forward 1997 – Governments around the world liberalise trade and withdraw from intervening in the economy, giving new opportunities to those who are skilled, industrious and adaptable, but disrupts the social order for others. In the United States, Proposition 13 is the precursor to Reaganism, and the inequalities that later emerge lead to the LA riots and the rise of gated communities. Russian society struggles to adapt to a market economy, and in Bosnia and elsewhere the demise of socialism revives ethnic tensions and separatism. However, in China economic reforms started by Deng Xiaoping lift living standards, and the internet allows high skill work to be transferred from the West to India. The episode ends with the narrator noting how globalisation has contributed to one of the most significant achievements of the twentieth century, that more people have control over their own destinies than ever before. Interviewees include Donald Hodge and Mike Eruzione. (US version title: Back To The Future).

People's Century Episode 4 Lost Peace 1919

A departure from other documentaries that observe history as the actions of great menPeople’s Century considers the Century from the view of common people. Most persons interviewed were ordinary men and women who closely witnessed various events and they give personal accounts how developments in the Twentieth Century affected their lives. The opening credits depict various images from the century and a very short introduction. Episode 9 Lost Peace 1919 – The trauma of the First World War gives Europe no appetite for any further conflicts, but within subsequent two decades the world would return to rearmament and militarism. The Paris Peace Conference introduced the concept of self determination, leading to the establishment of Czechoslovakia, Poland and Yugoslavia from the former Central Powers. The League of Nations is established to assist in resolving international disputes in an open environment, but fails to receive strong support and is eventually proven impotent in preventing Italy’s conquest of Ethiopia. Despite a public push for disarmament, prompted by All Quiet on the Western Front and other reminders of the First World War, few countries make any serious moves. French and British demands for heavy war reparations, lead to Germany’s economic ruin, but this and other unforeseen consequences of the Treaty of Versailles would result in the emergence of Adolf Hitler. As Germany begins to absorb its neighbours, the rest of Europe mobilises, and the moral utility of pacifism is questioned. The introductory scene shows Armistice Day. Interviewees include Lord Soper.

People's Century Episode 11 Brave New World 1945

A departure from other documentaries that observe history as the actions of great men People’s Century considers the Century from the view of common people. Most persons interviewed were ordinary men and women who closely witnessed various events and they give personal accounts how developments in the Twentieth Century affected their lives. The opening credits depict various images from the century and a very short introduction. Episode 11 Brave New World 1945 – Despite being allies against Hitler, disagreement and rivalry soon break out between the Soviet Union and the West, leading to the Cold War. The Soviet Union installs puppet regimes across Eastern Europe with planned economies, prompting Churchill to deliver his Iron Curtain speech. Both sides increasingly distrusts the other, and use propaganda to promote their cause. In 1949 McCarthyism and the Mosinee mock Soviet coup demonstrate US anxiety about communism following Soviet acquisition of the atom bomb and the victory of communism in China. The Berlin Blockade, the Korean War and the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 become flashpoints, although both sides eventually begin to believe in peaceful coexistence and accept a division of spheres of influence. The Soviet Block remains wary of the influence of Western ideas and its superior standard of living, and in 1962 reinforces its divide with the West by building the Berlin Wall. The introductory scene shows the fracternal relationship that had existed between Soviet and Western forces when they finally met in Germany in 1945. Interviewees include Manny Fried and Gail Halverson.

Rome Rise and Fall of an Empire Episode 6 The Dacian Wars

It is 114 B.C. and the Republic of Rome is a small empire clinging to the rim of the Mediterranean. Suddenlyterror grips the Romans as the first barbarian attack smashes through the imperial boarder, paving the way for what would become one of the most tumultuous eras in the history of mankind. Filled with dramatic re-enactments and action packed battle scenes, Rome Rise and Fall of an Empire chronicles the dramatic story of one of history’s greatest empires from its first major battle to its remarkable military feats and through its eventual fall. This is the History Channel series, not BBC. Dacian Wars – Despite the Empire’s successes, the extensive military campaigns begin to take their toll on Rome’s finances. When Dacian tribes ravage Roman lands, the unpopular Emperor Domitian is forced to raise taxes. He has never been on the front lines himself, but one of his generals, a young man named Trajan, soon proves to be a worthy leader while battling Germanic tribes on the Rhine.

The Most Evil Men and Women in History Countess Elisabeth Batory

This series of programs consists of 16 episodes which profile 16 evil men and women throughout history who have used their power to torturekill, maim and eradicate millions of people. A discovery channel/UK channel five series, this is actually a collection of independently produced one off documentaries that were packaged into a series. The list of Most Evil/Women is based on books by Miranda Twiss. Countess Elizabeth Bathory – She is considered the most infamous serial killer in Hungarian/Slovak history. Rumours had circulated for years about missing peasant girls, offered well paid work at the castle, they were never seen again. The native form of her name is ecsedi Bathory Erzsebet in Hungarian.

The Most Evil Men and Women in History Vlad Tepest

This series of programs consists of 16 episodes which profile 16 evil men and women throughout history who have used their power to torturekill, maim and eradicate millions of people. Vlad the Impaler – Vlad is best known for the legends of the exceedingly cruel punishments he imposed during his reign and for serving as the primary inspiration for the vampire main character in Bram Stoker’s popular Dracula novel.