1968 Vietnam

Join hosts Peter and Dan Snow for a look at the decisive conflicts of the 20th century. The intricacies of these crucial battlesstrategies, weapons, tactics and their impact. CGI brings to life an overview of the major actions, while the dramatized testimony of ordinary soldiers brings the experience of combat. 1968 Vietnam – Covers the Tet Offensive, in particular the fighting at Saigon and Khe Sanh, but the main focus is on the Battle of Hue. Dan Snow participates in training for urban assault.

Last Living Dinosaur

Using CGI and fossil evidenceEvolutions demonstrates nature’s survival of the fittest in action. This three part series illuminates unique and bizarre evolutionary journeys that have brought forth some of the world’s most impressive animals. Evolutions Last Living Dinosaur Leading scientists use cutting edge CGI to trace the extraordinary evolutionary path of the turkey, starting with one of the first dinosaurs.

Episode 5 The Meeting Of Two Oceans

The world’s largest democracy and a rising economic giantIndia is now as well known across the globe for its mastery of computer technology as it is for its many armed gods and its famous spiritual traditions. Like other great civilizations had not just one but several brilliant golden ages in art and culture. Episode 5 The Meeting of Two Oceans – The fifth episode of the story of India takes us to the time of the Renaissance in Europe, when India was the richest, most populous civilization in the world. We visit the desert cities of Rajasthan and travel among the fabulous Mughal cities.

Episode 2 Sacred Spaces

How did an Indian Buddhist shrine influence a Japanese pagoda? How are Italian pigs and cowry shells related to porcelain? Why did the ferocious warriors of Mongolia wear silk underwear? These intriguing questions are investigated in Artifactsa series that explores the origins and hidden connections among the art and artifacts of the great cultures and belief systems across Asia to understand the impact of calligraphy, porcelain, architecture, metallurgy, wood block printing and silk on Asian history and on the history of the world in general. Episode 2 Sacred Spaces – Chinese buildings evolved from simple shelters into complex, magnificent structures with great, swooping roofs, stately columns, and rich detail. And to start this story at the beginning, we have to leap back two millennia, to when the brilliant tyrant Qin Shihuang becomes the first emperor of a unified China.

Episode 1 Secrets

The Forbidden City in Beijing was an ancient palace whose very name inspired awe and fear. Until the 20th century the Forbidden City was one of the most secret places on earth. In the past people who trespassed paid with their lives but today the price of an entrance ticket is cheaper and 8 million visitors a year walk where once only emperors trod. Episode 1 Secrets – It was truly a forbidden” city. For centuries access was denied to all but the emperor his family and his most senior officials and servants. A swift and painful execution faced anyone who trespassed on its sacred precincts. With unprecedented access our cameras enter the heart of the palace to provide stunning images of its magnificent buildings and reveal the secrets of those who lived there.

1984 A Sikh Story

Just over 25 years agothe storming of The Golden Temple, the most sacred of Sikh shrines, by the Indian Army led to protests around the world. Sonia Deol embarks on a personal journey to unravel the events of 1984, an iconic year for Sikhs. It culminated in thousands of deaths including the assassination of the Prime Minister, Mrs Indira Gandhi. The bloody aftermath that followed so shocks Sonia that she is forced to reappraise the depth of her commitment to her faith.

Episode 4 Olympic Fever

Documentary series about the hopes and dreams of a group of children at three schools in rural Chinait takes as its subject one small town in rural Anhui, and focuses on their lives during the course of a single academic year. The schools are schools like many thousands of others across this vast nation, but through the individual stories of hardship, joy and success, an extraordinary portrait emerges, not just of a group of children and a town, but of a side of the Chinese nation seldom seen. Episode 4 Olympic Fever – It’s Autumn, it’s time for the students to hit the sports field. For the deputy head teacher of Haiyang Middle school sports day is a mammoth undertaking, while School Radio DJ Zha Yujie sees it as the highlight of the year. At Ping Min primary school they’re holding their first ever sports day as always, there are lessons to be learned all round.

Pandas of The Sleeping Dragon

Natural World is a classic wildlife series which tells in depth stories of incredible animalsfeaturing award winning photography in some of the most extraordinary places in the world. Episode Pandas of The Sleeping Dragon – Wolong Shan, in Sichuan province is China’s main panda reserve, which is home to giant and red pandas and giant salamanders, as well as golden monkeys. Focuses on the predicament of the giant panda and on the lessser known red panda. The giant panda’s digestive system is more suited to meat eating yet, because it feeds almost exclusively on bamboo, which has a low nutritional value, the animal must feed virtually around the clock to survive. Other animals that live in the forests include parrot bills, bamboo rats, golden monkeys, tufted deer, wild dogs, golden pheasants and the takin, a distant relative of the musk ox. The giant salamander, known as the water dragon, the world’s largest amphibian is also to be found in the area.

Scotland’s Forgotten War

60 years after the Korean WarJackie Bird investigates why one of the biggest conflicts of the 20th century has slipped from public memory. The war, in which thousands of young Scottish national servicemen fought, caused more British deaths than the Afghan, Iraq and Falklands wars combined. Jackie Bird discovers her own personal connection to the conflict and traces what happened to one of its forgotten victims. She also travels to Korea with some of the surviving Scottish veterans, on an emotional journey to reclaim their past. Although their numbers are dwindling with the passage of time, many of the Korean War veterans still have to come to terms with a war the rest of the country has largely forgotten.

Episode 11 The Wrong Empire

From the dawn of civilization to the 20th centuryA History of Britain re-animates familiar tales and illuminates overlooked aspects of England’s past. Hosted by Simon Schama, this series discards timelines and tiresome lineages for a lively look at the personalities and cultures that infuse British history. Epic themes and towering figures that transformed an island at the edge of the world” into the greatest empire on earth. Episode 11 The Wrong Empire-Discovering how the expansion of imperialism was built on the Empire’s slave trade and relied on the subjugation of native peoples to enrich the mother country despite Britons’ natural distrust of large armies and all powerful governments.

The Anzacs

The ultimate success or failure of many of the battles of World War II boiled down to men and machines locked in a fight to the death. Special regimentssquadrons and naval services, together with clandestine forces and formations, gave the vast, overall fighting forces of World War II an extra edge in the most pivotal battles. Gladiators of World War II examines the establishment and background of the greatest fighting forces of the Second World War. Each program examines a different unit, dissecting its command structure, military objectives, battle formations and its success or failure in applying its tactics and strategy to each of the major theatres in which it fought. Episode The Anzacs – The Australian and New Zealand forces built on the reputation they had earned during World War 1 for being among the finest fighting troops in the world. Australian troops earned the nickname the Rats of Tobruk for their defence of the Libyan port during Rommel’s long but ultimately abortive siege of it. New Zealanders fought the length of North Africa and Italy. In the Far East, after suffering disaster in Malaya, Australians became the first Allied ground forces to drive back the Japanese during the grim battles on the Kokoda Trail in the mountainous jungle of New Guinea.

Episode 6 Freedom and Liberation

The world’s largest democracy and a rising economic giant India is now as well known across the globe for its mastery of computer technology as it is for its many armed gods and its famous spiritual traditions. Like other great civilizations had not just one but several brilliant golden ages in art and culture. Freedom and Liberation – This episode examines the British Raj and India

Episode 3 The Mystery of Porcelain

How did an Indian Buddhist shrine influence a Japanese pagoda? How are Italian pigs and cowry shells related to porcelain? Why did the ferocious warriors of Mongolia wear silk underwear? These intriguing questions are investigated in Artifactsa series that explores the origins and hidden connections among the art and artifacts of the great cultures and belief systems across Asia to understand the impact of calligraphy, porcelain, architecture, metallurgy, wood block printing and silk on Asian history and on the history of the world in general. Episode 3 The Mystery of Porcelain – When pieces of Chinese porcelain were first seen in the West, they were so rare and exquisite that they very quickly became more valuable than gold. Why? Because Europeans really had no idea how porcelain was made, and the medieval Italian merchants who first brought porcelain to Europe couldn’t believe it was man made.

Episode 2 Survival

The Forbidden City in Beijing was an ancient palace whose very name inspired awe and fear. Until the 20th century the Forbidden City was one of the most secret places on earth. In the past people who trespassed paid with their lives but today the price of an entrance ticket is cheaper and 8 million visitors a year walk where once only emperors trod. Episode 2 Survival – Focuses on the time of the last Emperor Pu Yi and the restoration of the Forbidden City during the 20th century. With the emperor gone there was no guarantee the Forbidden City would survive. As the 600th anniversery of its construction approaches an ambitious restoration project is attempting to turn back the clock and return the palace to its former glory. The renovation has solved some old mysteries and uncovered some new ones.

Coolies: How Britain Re-Invented Slavery

The slave trade was abolished over years ago but one form of slavery continued well into the 20th century. The so-called coolies” comprised over one million Indians who migrated to all corners of the British Empire to carry out indentured labour. It is a chapter in colonial history that implicates figures at the very highest level of the British establishment and has defined the demographic shape of the modern world. In this filmwhich combines historical evidence and archive material, descendants of the coolies look into their past and trace the last surviving witnesses.

Episode 5 Loved Ones

Documentary series about the hopes and dreams of a group of children at three schools in rural Chinait takes as its subject one small town in rural Anhui, and focuses on their lives during the course of a single academic year. The schools are schools like many thousands of others across this vast nation, but through the individual stories of hardship, joy and success, an extraordinary portrait emerges, not just of a group of children and a town, but of a side of the Chinese nation seldom seen. Episode 5 Loved Ones – It’s a month of preparations for spring festival. It is also a popular time for weddings and several teachers from Xiuning Middle School get hitched. School radio broadcaster Zha Yujie goes to Beijing to study broadcasting. More often than not, it is the only time in the year when the family can be together. But this year the people of Anhui and southern china are faced with the worst weather in 50 years and the treasured promise of seeing their parents again begins to look less than certain.

Mao’s Bloody Revolution

For 27 years Mao Tse Tung held absolute power. This is the first full account of his life ever shown on television. This documentary shows the tormentbeatings and killings of Mao’s cultural revolution and the terror and famine that preceded it and killed tens of millions. For the first time Mao’s intimates speak out including, his granddaughter, his doctor, his valet, his english teacher, his bodyguard and commrades of his early days in the communist party. Together they provide the keys, not only to China’s past, but to an understanding of China today. Hosted by Philip Short, BBC correspondent and author of Mao: A Life. The first half of the documentary covers the course of the Chinese revolution up to the Cultural Revolution. The second half covers the Cultural Revolution to Mao’s death.

The First Emperor The Man Who Made China

The First Emperor The Man Who Made China follows the rise and fall of Chin Shi Huang China’s legendary first emperor. The Discovery Channel was allowed unprecedented access to Emperor Chin’s underground burial complex that spans over seven square miles. The team employs cutting edge technology such as ground penetrating radar combined with CGI to illustrate the design and layout of the largest unopened tomb in the world.

Episode 14 The Empire of Good Intentions

From the dawn of civilization to the 20th centuryA History of Britain re-animates familiar tales and illuminates overlooked aspects of England’s past. Hosted by Simon Schama, this series discards timelines and tiresome lineages for a lively look at the personalities and cultures that infuse British history. Epic themes and towering figures that transformed an island at the edge of the world” into the greatest empire on earth. Episode 14 Empire of Good Intentions – How the noble ideals behind the British Empire failed to match the reality. While British society believed it was delivering the benefits of modern Western civilization in truth the inhabitants of India and Ireland suffered privation due to a laissez – faire economic policy.

The Chindits

The ultimate success or failure of many of the battles of World War II boiled down to men and machines locked in a fight to the death. Special regimentssquadrons and naval services, together with clandestine forces and formations, gave the vast, overall fighting forces of World War II an extra edge in the most pivotal battles. Gladiators of World War II examines the establishment and background of the greatest fighting forces of the Second World War. Each program examines a different unit, dissecting its command structure, military objectives, battle formations and its success or failure in applying its tactics and strategy to each of the major theatres in which it fought. Episode The Chindits – Born of one man’s vision at a time when the Japanese seemed to be sweeping all before them, the Chindits proved an inspiration to the Allied forces in Burma. They showed that it was not only possible to live in the jungle for months on end but also that Western troops could defeat the Japanese.

Episode 3 Killing Space

Controversial historian Professor Niall Ferguson argues that in the last century there were not in fact two World Wars and a Cold Warbut a single Hundred Years’ War. It was not nationalism that powered the conflicts of the century, but empires. It was not ideologies of class or the advent of socialism driving the century, but race. Ultimately, ethnic conflict underpinned 20th century violence. Finally, it was not the west that triumphed as the century progressed, in fact, power slowly and steadily migrated towards the new empires of the East. Episode 3 Killing Space – How the rise of the Axis powers led to a fundamental redrawing of the world map. He pinpoints 1942 as a pivotal year, and considers how the 20th century might have unfolded had World War Two ended differently, with totalitarian regimes dividing the globe between them.

Episode 4 Soul of the Samurai

How did an Indian Buddhist shrine influence a Japanese pagoda? How are Italian pigs and cowry shells related to porcelain? These intriguing questions are investigated in Artifactsa series that explores the origins and hidden connections among the art and artifacts of the great cultures and belief systems across Asia to understand the impact of calligraphy, porcelain, architecture, metallurgy, wood block printing and silk on Asian history and on the history of the world in general. Episode 4 Soul of the Samurai – Why has the samurai sword always been such a powerful symbol of Japanese culture? In the year 1900, Dr. Nitobe wrote a book in English called Bushido he wrote, just as the code of the samurai is the soul of Japan, the sword is the soul of the samurai.

Episode 1 The Way of the Samurai

Japan blossomed into its Renaissance at approximately the same time as Europe. Unlike the Westit flourished not through conquest and exploration, but by fierce and defiant isolation. And the man at the heart of this empire was Tokugawa Ieyasu, a warlord who ruled with absolute control. This period is explored through myriad voices the Shogun, the Samurai, the Geisha, the poet, the peasant and the Westerner who glimpsed into this secret world. Episode 1 The Way of the Samurai – Tokugawa Ieyasu unifies Japan and establishes a dynasty that will rule Japan for over 250 years.

Crossing The Line

At midday on August 15,1962, in the depths of the Cold War, a depressed US Army private, James Joe” Dresnok bolted across the most heavily fortified border on earthdirectly through a minefield, and into another world. One of four American defectors who crossed over to the hard line communist North during the 1960s, Dresnok has lived in the North Korean capital Pyongyang ever since, and has not been seen by the outside world for 44 years. Now, the American defector’s astonishing story is being told for the first time. It is a story of betrayal, kidnappings and the alleged “breeding” of spies in the most secretive nation on the planet.

Tiananmen Square

Declassified takes viewers inside vaults and archives around the world to reveal the untold stories of modern history. With the fall of the Iron Curtain and the advent of market economies worldwidenew footage and materials are flooding out of formerly secret organizations like East Germany’s Stasi, the Kremlin, the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency, and state television in Korea. Declassified reveals the stories behind the previously unseen footage with modern graphics, editing, story telling, relentless, fast cut montage and a rock beat. Episode Tiananmen Square – It started out as China’s answer to Woodstock, but it ended like Kent State. Here, using unseen footage and declassified diplomatic sources, we present a previously shrouded story of the battles and deaths of hundreds of young Chinese students in June 1989, martyrs for democracy at Tiananmen Square, and the imprisonment of many others. Watch the birth and death of a movement, and learn how the demonstrators changed China forever.